• 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1.0

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1.0 to 2.0

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower-division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 110A. Social Science in Context: Perspectives and Methods in Study of Culture and Society

    Units: 4.0

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to social science perspectives and methods for study of culture and society through combination of theoretical discussions and practical exercises. Students gain understanding of interaction of persons, societies, cultures, environments, and time. Examination of relationships between language, culture, and society to gain insights into processes of social reproduction of identities, power relations, and inequality. Students are exposed to working parts of social research: ethics of studying people and communities, gathering and analyzing of data (e.g., observations, interviews, and surveys), and interpretation and presentation of findings. Students gain informed and responsible values and attitudes towards just society, intercultural understanding, informed and active citizenship, ethical research practices, and lifelong learning. Letter grading.

  • 110B. Social Science in Context: Understanding New Zealand from Colonialism to Neoliberalism

    Units: 4.0

    Lecture, eight hours (four weeks). Offered as part of summer UCLA Travel Study Program to New Zealand. Examination of life in Aotearoa, also known as New Zealand. Focus on historical events and social processes as well as axes of difference such as ethnicity and class and ways in which they have shaped and continue to influence cultural, political, social structures, and norms and values in New Zealand. Students learn to employ social science theories and concepts to gain deeper understanding of issues New Zealand faces. Through readings, classroom discussions, field trips, which provide valuable firsthand experiences, local guest speakers, and unique opportunity of exploring forces that shape society and culture in context of one of most celebrated democracies in world, students gain greater insight into social and political relations and events elsewhere in world, including U.S. Letter grading.

  • 188. Academic Innovation in Industry

    Units: 1.0

    Lecture, one hour (six weeks). Exploration of how to apply disciplinary knowledge to industry problems and technology trends. Students build skills to enable them to create novel ways of meeting challenges, build network intelligence, and communication their ideas and expertise. Students also learn problem-solving techniques like lean startup approach. Uses case study approach to show how social scientists have connected with recent technology trends to produce impactful innovation. P/NP grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1.0 to 4.0

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 400A. Social Science Research and Perspectives

    Units: 4.0

    Seminar, three hours. Exploration of contribution of social science research to addressing complex social problems. Students engage wide array of disciplinary perspectives, research methods, and analytical approaches. Emphasis placed on development of multidisciplinary, integrative approaches to social science research. Students learn how to identify and frame social problem; how to identify, interpret, and evaluate relevant research; and how to synthesize research findings generated from different theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary approaches. Development of essential research, writing, and analytic skills. Letter grading.

  • 400B. Social Science Research and Perspectives

    Units: 4.0

    Seminar, three hours. Exploration of contribution of social science research to addressing complex social problems. Students engage wide array of disciplinary perspectives, research methods, and analytical approaches. Emphasis placed on development of multidisciplinary, integrative approaches to social science research. Students learn how to identify and frame social problem; how to identify, interpret, and evaluate relevant research; and how to synthesize research findings generated from different theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary approaches. Development of essential research, writing, and analytic skills. Letter grading.

  • 401. Qualitative Social Science Research Methods

    Units: 4.0

    Seminar, three hours. Introduction to range of qualitative approaches used in social science research and analysis through combination of theoretical discussions and practical experience. Examination of practical and epistemological issues in qualitative research in workshop format. Covers practical workings of qualitative research: gathering data through interviews, focus groups, observation, questionnaires, and archival research; strategies for recording, coding, and analyzing qualitative data; and evaluating and presenting qualitative research. Prepares students to undertake research using qualitative methods through collaborative class research project. Letter grading.

  • 402. Quantitative Data Analysis in Social Science

    Units: 4.0

    Lecture, two and one half hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to fundamentals of data analysis and statistics, focusing on application of statistical methods in social problems research. Students develop skills and strategies for evaluating research evidence, and for comparing and synthesizing results of studies that adopt different research methodologies. Descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, probability, statistical tests, correlation, and causation, and regression analysis. Other topics include organizing quantitative data (e.g., tables, graphs), methods for describing data with respect to central tendency, dispersion, and association. At course end students should be able to perform data analysis using appropriate software, to interpret results, and to make critical evaluations of quantitative social science research. Letter grading.

  • 403. Quantitative Evidence and Analysis in Social Sciences

    Units: 4.0

    Seminar, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Advanced training in data analysis and statistics, and training in strategies for evaluating research evidence and comparing results of studies that adopt varying research methodologies. Students gain experience working with large datasets, and with designing, testing, and validating statistical modeling techniques. Students are familiarized with datasets most relevant to their individual research interests. Students receive general training and individualized mentoring in selecting appropriate dataset for their major research paper (MRP). Letter grading.

  • 404. Research Design in Social Science

    Units: 4.0

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to main components of research projects, focusing on research questions, theoretical frameworks, and research design. Students design feasible research plan for individual project. Students identify research topic and specify research question; identify existing data for original analysis; compare theoretical frameworks for social scientific analysis of data; assess relevant evidence and literature; and explore approaches to data analysis. Students submit assignments, and complete research proposal. Letter grading.

  • 410. Engaged Social Science

    Units: 4.0

    Seminar, three hours. Exploration of theory and practice of engaged social science, tracing its historical development from policy studies and related fields to more activist modalities of critique and intervention. Drawing on classic and contemporary studies in sociology, anthropology, political science, environmental studies, and social justice, to engage students in larger debates about politics of knowledge in relation to issues, such as poverty, racism, public health, refugees, gang culture, gender hierarchies, public education, and citizenship. Letter grading.

  • 419. Data Analysis

    Units: 4.0

    Lecture, three hours. Workshop in which students develop research and analysis skills related to establishing and executing data analysis plan. Students engage in intensive peer-review process, working collaboratively in small groups. Students receive detailed feedback from instructor, teaching assistants, and faculty readers, and are expected to routinely revise their work. Students refine their presentation skills and prepare three- to five-minute presentation. Letter grading.

  • 420. Research Design and Analysis

    Units: 4.0

    Seminar, three hours. Guided completion of major research paper (MRP). Students receive detailed feedback from instructor, revise literature review, finalize analysis, tighten rhetoric, and improve organization of manuscript to transform it into final research paper. Letter grading.

  • 430. Community-Based Research

    Units: 4.0

    Lecture, three hours; fieldwork, two hours. Study of principles, ethics, and methods of community-based research (CBR), and place and purpose of scholarly inquiry. Working in teams, students conduct small-scale research projects in collaboration with local community organizations. Teams work closely with instructors and organization agents on all aspects of research design, execution, and data analysis. Students apply quantitative and qualitative research methods skills acquired in courses 401 and 402 to research projects. Attendance at research site meetings, team meetings, and weekly on-campus class meetings required. Each team produces and submits final research report to community partner by end of quarter. Letter grading.

  • 430A. Community-Based Research, Part 1

    Units: 4.0

    Lecture, three hours; fieldwork, two hours. Part 1 of 2-part series. Students learn principles, ethics, and methods of community-based research (CBR), and place and purpose of scholarly inquiry. Working in teams, students conduct small-scale research projects in collaboration with local community organizations. Research projects are selected in consultation with instructor and community organization to be completed within quarter. Teams work closely with instructors and organization agents on all aspects of research. Teams develop research design, data collection methods and protocols, recruit participants, and engage in data collection. Students apply quantitative and qualitative research methods skills acquired in courses 401 and 402 to their research projects. Students are expected to attend meetings at research sites, team meetings, and weekly class meetings on campus. Letter grading.

  • 430B. Community-Based Research, Part 2

    Units: 4.0

    Lecture, three hours; fieldwork, two hours. Part 2 of 2-part series. Focus on data analysis and writing of final report. Working in teams, students develop data analysis plan, identify units of analysis, develop coding scheme, determine statistical inquiries, and conduct data analysis (including statistical analyses of quantitative data and coding of qualitative data) and interpretation of results. Work is divided fairly among team members with each team member contributing based on their skills and talents. Teams work closely with instructors and organization agents on all aspects of research and write-up. Students are expected to attend all meetings at research sites, team meetings, and weekly class meetings on campus. Each team produces and submits final research report to instructor and community partner. Letter grading.

  • M460A. Voting Rights Policy and Law I

    Units: 4.0

    (Same as Public Policy M296A.) Clinic, two hours; field work, one hour. Collaborative course taught from perspective of social science research, civil rights, and voting rights. Exposes students to voting rights act theory, case law, history, research, and implementation. Faculty guest experts from across campus provide their perspective on how to study, research, and document various aspects related to voting rights. Includes factors such as history of discrimination against minority group in areas of employment, education, housing, and political representation. Students learn and implement in-depth study of methodology and statistical approach to document presence or absence of vote dilution or vote denial in different jurisdictions. Discussion of history and legal principles of federal Voting Rights Act and California Voting Rights Act led by leading voting rights attorney. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M460B. Voting Rights Policy and Law II

    Units: 4.0

    (Same as Public Policy M296B.) Clinic, three hours. Requisite: course M460A. Collaborative course taught from perspective of social science research, civil rights, and voting rights. Exposes students to voting rights act theory, case law, history, research, and implementation. Faculty guest experts from across campus provide their perspective on how to study, research, and document various aspects related to voting rights. Includes factors such as history of discrimination against minority group in areas of employment, education, housing, and political representation. Focus on practical aspects of voting rights lawsuit. Students learn in greater detail legal theory relevant to bringing successful voting rights challenge, and how to assemble and present social science evidence. Students read case law on prior Voting Rights Act decisions, review accompanying expert reports, and work in teams on aspects of lawsuit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M460C. Voting Rights Policy and Law III

    Units: 4.0

    (Same as Public Policy M296C.) Clinic, three hours. Requisites: courses M460A, M460B. Collaborative course taught from perspective of social science research, civil rights, and voting rights. Exposes students to voting rights act theory, case law, history, research, and implementation. Faculty guest experts from across campus provide their perspective on how to study, research, and document various aspects related to voting rights. Includes factors such as history of discrimination against minority group in areas of employment, education, housing, and political representation. Students continue work on all aspects of voting rights cases including preparation of expert research reports, legal argumentation and filings, depositions, and other case-related matters. S/U or letter grading.