• 3. Human Physiology for Healthcare Providers

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Basic understanding of human physiological processes, with emphasis on applications to patient evaluation and care. Concepts underlying normal function and how alterations in these normal functions can affect body systems. Knowledge and understanding of these normal human processes is basic to providing quality nursing care. Examination of system variations across lifespan. Letter grading.

  • 10. Introduction to Nursing and Social Justice I

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Within context of history of nursing, introduction to practice of nurses, including role of advocacy. Discussion of effective use of self as professional nurse in relation to ethics, cultural competence, and human diversity. Introduction to ethical principles (justice, autonomy, veracity, beneficence, confidentiality) and professional values (altruism, autonomy, human dignity, integrity, and social justice) in relation to nursing practice throughout history in health/illness and end-of-life contexts. Letter grading.

  • 13. Introduction to Human Anatomy

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Structural presentation of human body, including musculoskeletal, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, renal, and reproductive systems. Laboratory uses virtual cadaver dissection and examination. Letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 20. Introduction to Nursing and Social Justice II

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Requisite: course 10. Advanced discussion on history of nursing, with focus on role of contemporary nursing in relation to ethics and social justice. Analysis of ethical principles (justice, autonomy, veracity, beneficence, confidentiality) and professional values (altruism, autonomy, human dignity, integrity, and social justice) in relation to nursing practice throughout history in health/illness and end-of-life contexts. Evaluation of social, cultural, legal, and political forces in relation to paternalism for professional nurses working with diverse patient populations in the 21st century. Letter grading.

  • 50. Fundamentals of Epidemiology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Epidemiology is interdisciplinary science with goal of identifying and describing patterns of disease occurrence, identifying determinants of disease, and evaluating disease prevention and health care treatment efforts. With its focus on human populations, epidemiology is directly linked with public health research, policy, and practice. Introduction to fundamental definitions, concepts, methods, and critical thinking used in epidemiologic study. Designed to lay foundation for future study to evaluate factors related to health outcomes in human populations using epidemiologic principles. Letter grading

  • 54A. Pathophysiology I

    Units: 3

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 3, 13 taken within past three years. Designed to provide students with basic understanding of pathophysiological changes that occur within internal environment of individual. Concepts underlying pathologic changes across all body systems are presented. Understanding these alterations is basic to providing quality nursing care. System variations across lifespan are addressed. Letter grading.

  • 54B. Pathophysiology II

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Requisite: course 54A. Designed to provide students with understanding of pathophysiological changes that occur at cellular, tissue, and organ level across selected body systems within internal environment of individual. Presence of dysfunction or disease of selected systems is provided as rationale for nursing diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. Letter grading.

  • 98T. Critical Perspectives and Health Promotion among Refugees

    Units: 5

    Seminar, three hours. Requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Freshmen/sophomores preferred. Examination of social and cultural influences on health and behaviors of refugees. Investigation of prejudice against newcomers, challenges to health promotion, and disease prevention among refugees. Interpretation of current policy debates and development of interventions. Letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 105. Human Physiology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for nursing students. Lecture and discussion, with emphasis on a correlative approach to anatomy and physiology of human body. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 115. Pharmacology and Therapeutics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 54A, 54B. Clinical pharmacology for undergraduate nursing students, beginning with emphasis on basic pharmacologic principles. Focus on major drug classes and their mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects, and clinical issues. Letter grading.

  • 150A. Fundamentals of Professional Nursing I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 10, 20, 54A. Focuses on theoretical foundations of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention as they relate to nursing care management in acute care settings for Nursing BS students. Emphasis is on application of relevant theories to Nursing BS practice roles in health care systems through case study examples, with focus on application to clinical practice settings that include culturally diverse populations. Concepts of communication, nursing process as clinical decision-making strategy, and critical thinking skills are introduced as essential to practice of professional nursing. Learning experiences in nursing skills laboratory and in clinical settings are integral components. Introduction to mathematics calculations and terminology used in clinical setting. Letter grading.

  • 150B. Fundamentals of Professional Nursing II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 150A, 152A, 152B, 174. Continuation of course 150A. Expansion of student knowledge on practice of professional nursing as theory-based goal-directed method for assisting patients to meet basic human needs at various levels of health continua. Concepts of communication, interdisciplinary communication and collaboration, interpersonal relationships, cultural competence, and nursing process with critical thinking skills as clinical decision-making strategies essential to practice of professional nursing. Characteristics and roles of professional nursing. Development of caregiver, teacher, and collaborator roles in learning experiences in nursing skills laboratory and clinical settings. Continued work on mathematical calculations and terminology with addition of intravenous (IV) drip medication calculations used in clinical setting. Letter grading.

  • 152A. Health Promotion: Growth and Development in Culturally Diverse Populations

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered 152W.) Lecture, two hours. Introduction to primary prevention strategies as they pertain to health and wellness across lifespan, using population-based approach to nursing care of diverse populations. Priorities in growth and development and reproductive health, including issues related to contraception and parenting; well-child care, school-age health, and chronic illness-prevention strategies for young- and middle-aged adults; elderly who live independently in communities or within institutions. Analysis of influence of overarching political, societal, and governmental systems within U.S. Letter grading.

  • 152B. Health Promotion: Nutrition in Culturally Diverse Populations

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Examination of primary prevention strategies involving nutrition using population-based and clinical approaches to nursing care of diverse populations. Investigation of nutrition in relation to prevention of disease and recovery from disease. Covers biological, public health, and clinical aspects of major macro- and micronutrients, obesity, malnutrition, dietary assessment, nutritional therapies, and exercise using candidate disease approach. Examination of influences of overarching political, societal, and governmental systems within U.S. and outside U.S. on observed nutritional patterns. Letter grading.

  • C155. Global Health Elective: Globalization, Social Justice, and Human Rights

    Units: 3

    Seminar, two hours. Exploration of theories, issues, debates, and pedagogy associated with globalization, social justice, and human rights and how these perspectives influence human health and well-being. Provides students with unique opportunity to explore these topics within classroom, via Internet and other technologies, and in other classrooms located around globe. Students, through collaborative projects with peers around world, reflect on how globalization shapes and transforms local communities and national cultures. Concurrently scheduled with course C255. Letter grading.

  • 160. Secondary Prevention

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 150A, 150B, 152A, 152B. Screening and early detection of illness to prevent chronic or acutely deteriorating illness. Expanding on concepts of health and human development and using nursing process, application of nursing role in providing care to individuals and their families to screen, diagnose, and treat illness at earliest possible time to prevent disability or premature mortality. Examination of health problems of individuals within context of family, social and community systems, and interdisciplinary healthcare systems. Emphasis on differences in developmental stages in response to screening for early and late signs and symptoms of illness in ambulatory and acute care settings, community agencies, rehabilitation units, outpatient specialty clinics and surgical units, and home and community settings. Letter grading.

  • 161. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, six hours. Requisites: courses 160, 162B. Knowledge development and skill assessment to promote mental health of individuals. Exploration of research underlying assessment, diagnosis, and pharmacotherapeutic and psychological treatment of individuals with psychiatric disorders. Application of theory in clinical interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating course of care for patients. Letter grading.

  • 162A. Foundational Concepts for Tertiary Prevention and Care of Medical-Surgical Patients and Families

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, three hours. Requisites: courses 54A, 54B, 150A. Corequisites: courses 115, 150B. Examination of nursing assessment and management of common health problems that adults experience. Theory content in basic assessment, health history, and diagnostic reasoning for selected health problems, with emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of basic knowledge of pathophysiology, stress and adaptation, adult development theory, therapeutic interventions, and communication concepts as applied to care of medical and surgical clients and their families. Introduction to concept of nurses as bedside scientists, with emphasis on critical and contextual thinking skills and diagnostic reasoning. Nursing process, ethical principles, clinical research, evidence-based practice, and clinical thinking that maximize patient safety and quality care used during clinical experiences. Letter grading.

  • 162B. Tertiary Prevention and Care of Medical-Surgical Patients and Families

    Units: 6

    Lecture, four hours; clinical, six hours. Requisite: course 162A. Pathophysiological and psychosocial aspects of assessment and management for selected acute and emergent problems of adult patients with complex illness, including multifaceted assessment, health history, and diagnostic reasoning skills, and emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of knowledge of pathophysiology, diagnostics, pharmacology, therapeutic interventions, evidence-based practice, patient safety, and communication concepts as applied to care of medical and surgical patients. Supervised practicum experience within settings of multidisciplinary teams directing care of medical-surgical clinical units, with focus on clinical interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating course of care for patients, both as individuals and cohorts. Intermediate-level assessment, health maintenance, and management of symptoms across lifespan. Letter grading.

  • 162C. Tertiary Prevention and Care of Complex Medical-Surgical Patients and Families

    Units: 8

    Lecture, four hours (10 weeks); clinical, 24 hours (five weeks). Requisite: course 162B. Nursing assessment and management of acute and chronic health problems of acutely ill adults. Content in assessment, health history, and diagnostic reasoning with emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of pathophysiology, pharmacology, stress and adaptation, adult development theory, therapeutic interventions, evidence-based practice, patient safety, and communication concepts as applied to care of acutely ill medical surgical patients, with complex and comorbid conditions, and their families. Emphasis on critical and contextual thinking skills and diagnostic reasoning. Nursing process, ethical principles, clinical research, evidence-based practice, and clinical thinking that maximize patient safety and quality care. Diagnosis and management of health care problems managed by master's-level clinical nurses in acute care settings. Letter grading.

  • 162D. Human Responses to Critical Illness: Introduction to Critical Care

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; fieldwork, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 162A, 162B, 162C. Pathophysiological and psychosocial concepts in acute life-limiting illness and nursing management of critically ill adults. Effect of critical illness on individual and family health and key diagnostic and therapeutic modalities that promote effective nursing management of individuals with complex critical illnesses addressed. Emphasis on rapid assessment, critical reasoning, prompt intervention, and outcome achievement with fluid replanning for rapidly changing disease conditions. Letter grading.

  • 163. Nursing Care of Geriatric Patients and Families

    Units: 3

    Lecture, two hours; clinical, one hour. Requisite: course 162A. Addresses prevention and management of acute and chronic health problems of older adults. Theory content emphasizes assessment, goal setting, treatment planning, and evaluation of nursing care of older adults and their families with emphasis on psychosocial, cultural, and developmental influences. Students integrate knowledge of pathophysiology, pharmacology, stress and adaptation, adult development theory, therapeutic interventions, and communication concepts as applied to care of older adult patients and their families. Emphasis on concept of nurse as nurse scientist with critical and contextual thinking skills and diagnostic reasoning. Nursing process, ethical principles, clinical research, evidenced-based practice, and clinical thinking that maximize patient safety and quality care for older adults are employed during clinical experiences. Letter grading.

  • 164. Maternity Nursing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, six hours. Requisites: courses 160, 160B. Nursing assessment and management for selected acute and emergent problems in maternity/newborn patients, with emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of basic knowledge of pathophysiology, diagnostics, pharmacology, therapeutic interventions, and communication concepts as applied to childbearing families, with application of nursing process, evidenced-based practice, problem-solving strategies, and critical thinking. Supervised clinical practicum experience within setting of multidimensional team, with focus on application of theory in clinical interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating nursing care for maternity/newborn patients. Intermediate-level assessment, health maintenance, and management of symptoms in this population. Letter grading.

  • 165. Pediatric Nursing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, six hours. Requisites: courses 160, 162B. Nursing assessment and management of acute, chronic, critical, and emergent illnesses in infants, children, and adolescents with emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of basic knowledge of pathophysiology, diagnostics, pharmacology, therapeutic interventions, and family-centered care concepts as applied to care of infants, children, and adolescents. Application of nursing process, evidence-based practice, and problem-solving and critical-thinking strategies to improve patient safety, care quality, and health outcomes. Supervised practicum experience within setting of multidimensional team in clinical interpretation, assessment, and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating nursing care for infants, children, and adolescents. Letter grading.

  • 168. Advanced Leadership and Role Integration

    Units: 5

    Lecture, five hours. Requisites: courses 161, 162C, 163, 164, 165. Leadership and management theories and models, resource allocation and management, delegation and teamwork, conflict resolution, healthy work environments, legal and ethical aspects of professional practice, evaluation of professional practice, patient safety and quality improvement, accreditation process for health care systems, and contemporary issues in workplace. Emphasis placed on integration of all professional role behaviors, application of research, evidence-based practice, and leadership-management of patient-centered care as transition is made from student role to that of practicing professional nurse. Focus placed on preparation for National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). Letter grading.

  • 169. Clinical Internship: Integration

    Units: 12

    Clinical, 36 hours. Requisites: courses 161, 162C, 163, 164, 165. Supervised practicum experience within clinical setting as part of interdisciplinary health care team. Focus on application of theory in clinical setting and interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating course of care for patients, both as individuals and cohorts. Students design and complete quality improvement project that contributes to unit's goals and objectives. Students implement advanced-level assessment, health maintenance, and management of symptomatology across lifespan. P/NP grading.

  • 171. Public Health Nursing

    Units: 6

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, nine hours. Requisites: courses 161, 162C, 163, 164, 165. Theoretical content focuses on population-based approach to public health nursing in relation to health promotion and disease prevention at level of individuals, families, communities, and systems. Clinical practicum concentrates on population-based public health nursing in culturally diverse settings including health departments, health policy institutions, and public service agencies. Clinical practicum activities include health promotion and disease prevention at level of communities, populations, and systems, both domestically and globally. Letter grading.

  • 173W. Introduction to Nursing Research & Writing II

    Units: 5

  • 174. Physical Assessment

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 3, 13. Designed to provide in-depth review and synthesis of physical assessment skills and knowledge covering lifespan. Individual study, use of audiovisual aids, physical assessment skills practice in laboratory, and required text are mandatory. Letter grading.

  • 175. Physical Assessment for Advanced Practice

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Comprehensive review and synthesis of physical assessment skills and knowledge covering lifespan and in diverse populations. Emphasis on history-taking related to general health status and specific complaints, as well as detailed physical examination techniques. Individual study, use of audiovisual aids, physical assessment skills practice in laboratory, and required text are mandatory. Letter grading.

  • 188. Special Topics in Nursing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Limited to junior/senior Nursing majors. Departmentally sponsored experimental or temporary courses, such as those taught by visiting faculty members. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 193. Journal Club or Speaker-Series Seminars: Nursing

    Units: 1

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to undergraduate students. Discussion of readings selected from current literature of field or of topics related to guest speaker series. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • 196. Research Apprenticeship in Nursing

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, four hours per week per unit. Limited to juniors/seniors. Entry-level research apprenticeship for upper division students under guidance of faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP grading.

  • 197. Individual Studies in Nursing

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, one hour. Limited to junior/senior Nursing majors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Nursing

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, two hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 200. Health Promotion and Assessment across Lifespan

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Review and discussion of research, theories, clinical practice guidelines, healthcare systems, and policies that influence assessment of health and health behaviors, health promotion, and screening of disease across lifespan among diverse populations in multiple settings in communities for advanced practice nurse (clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner). Letter grading.

  • 201. Health-Related Quality of Life

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Theoretical foundations of health-related quality of life as an outcome of disease, treatment, and style of care. Analysis of meaning, dimensions, predictors, measures, ethical dilemmas, cultural diversity issues, and biobehavioral foundations of health-related quality of life. Letter grading.

  • 202. Philosophy of Nursing Science

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Focus on philosophy of nursing science by exploring genealogies of thought that underpin epistemological assumptions about knowledge. Examination of philosophical concepts that shape discipline of nursing in relation to their influence on scientific reasoning and methods of inquiry, both quantitative and qualitative, used by nurse scientist to create new knowledge. Analysis of contemporary schools of thought (modern and postmodern) in relation to nursing scholarship as well as role of nurse scientist as leader in policy development in greater health care milieu. Letter grading.

  • 203A. Basic Statistics and Fundamentals for Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: one upper division statistics course. Introduction to applied statistics, including design, analysis of variance, correlation techniques, and regression. Sample size calculations, parametric versus nonparametric tests, and concepts of database design, management using statistical package programs. Letter grading.

  • 203B. Statistical Approaches for Complex Nursing Phenomena

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 203A. Use of multiple linear regression, including model validation, discriminant function analysis, principal components analysis, factorial and repeated measure analysis of variance models, logistic regression, analysis of survival data. Letter grading.

  • 204. Research Design and Critique

    Units: 4

    Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Complex research designs and analysis of multiple variables and research utilization. Emphasis on techniques for control of variables, data analysis, and interpretation of results. Focus on in-depth analysis of interrelationship of theoretical frameworks, design, sample selection, data collection instruments, and data analysis techniques. Content discussed in terms of clinical nursing research problems and application to clinical settings. Letter grading.

  • 205A. Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Research

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 202. Introduction to qualitative research design in nursing science. Examination of major methodologies that guide qualitative research in relation to various strategies for data collection (interviews, participant observation, focus groups), data analysis, and data interpretation. Scientific rigor and ethical concerns for research with human participants critically examined. Letter grading.

  • 205B. Advanced Qualitative Research: Grounded Theory Methodology I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 205A or equivalent approved by instructor. Students design and implement qualitative project study based on grounded theory methodology. Symbolic interactionism and constructivism as foundation with grounded theory as guide to recruit small sample, collect data through interviews and observations, and simultaneously analyze data through inductive coding and memoranda writing. Employment of constant comparison and examination of key elements of self-reflexivity and research ethics. Letter grading.

  • 205C. Advanced Qualitative Research: Grounded Theory Methodology II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 205A, 205B, or equivalent as approved by instructor. Advanced techniques for simultaneous collection and analysis of qualitative data. Employment of advanced levels of coding based on constructivist grounded theory methodology and situational analysis. Development of conceptual formulation (or grounded theory) based on pilot project data collected and analyzed as part of course. Letter grading.

  • 206A. Nursing Concept Development

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Requisites: course 202 or philosophy of science (may be taken concurrently), four units of nursing theory. Examination of history of conceptual and theoretical thinking in nursing and contextual issues that continue to influence development of nursing knowledge and nursing science. Application of skills fundamental to concept analysis and development in nursing and integral to use in nursing theory and research. Letter grading.

  • 206B. Nursing Theory Development

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered 206.) Lecture, two hours. Requisites: courses 202 or philosophy of science (may be taken concurrently), 206A. Preparation: 4 units of nursing theory. Critical analysis of role of theory and theoretical frameworks in developing nursing research. Application of skills fundamental to development of theory in nursing and integral to use of theory in nursing research. Letter grading.

  • 207. Quantitative Research Designs of Clinical Phenomena

    Units: 3

  • 208. Research in Nursing: Measurement of Outcomes

    Units: 3

    Lecture/discussion, three hours. Requisites: courses 202, 205A, 206A, 206B, 207, 210A, 210B, Biostatistics 100A, 201A. Advanced discussions of psychosocial, behavioral, and biophysical measurement and analysis in nursing research. Analysis of psychometrics, reliability, and internal validity of research instruments in relation to outcomes in nursing research. Letter grading.

  • 209. Human Diversity in Health and Illness

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Human diversity in response to illness that nurses diagnose and treat, centering on culture and human belief systems associated with diverse orientations related to ethnicity and gender. Provides conceptual base that nurses can use in clinical practice, research, teaching, and administration. Letter grading.

  • 210A. Critical Review of State of Science in Nursing Research

    Units: 3

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing or consent of instructor. In-depth exploration of state of science for health service, biological, vulnerable populations, and biobehavioral research topics. Students explore research on particular phenomena, analyze current and historical scholarly findings in literature, critique significance of focus on this phenomenon for nursing science, identify crucial and meaningful gaps in knowledge through systematic review of research literature, and provide recommendations for future nursing research in biologic, biobehavioral, vulnerable populations, and health services research. Letter grading.

  • 210B. State of Science in Nursing: Critical Synthesis of Literature

    Units: 3

    (Formerly numbered 210.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing or consent of instructor. In-depth analysis of published research relevant for health service, biological, vulnerable populations, and biobehavioral topics. Students deepen and refine understanding of state of science and scholarship relevant to research area. Students broaden exploration and analysis of identified gaps in current knowledge through advancing systematic review, critique, and synthesis of research literature. Letter grading.

  • 211. Women's Health Primary Care

    Units: 2 to 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Theory and research on assessment and management of women's health issues during reproductive years. Clinical topics include gynecology, family planning, pregnancy, and postpartum care, with emphasis on health promotion of women during reproductive years in primary care settings. Letter grading.

  • 212. Family Healthcare Perspectives

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Overview of conceptual frameworks related to contemporary family structure and functioning, with particular emphasis on health. Family is defined broadly to include nontraditional families; consideration of cross-cultural views of families as well. Identification of limitations of current theory and research related to family study and applicability of current knowledge to various problems encountered in care of families. Letter grading.

  • 213. Worker Health and Safety: Role and Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioner professional role, including care for workers and high-risk environmental groups. Letter grading.

  • 214. Seminar: Advanced Concepts in Oncology Nursing

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Designed for adult/gerontology acute care, gerontologic, and family nurse practitioners and clinical nurse specialists. Comprehensive overview of oncologic care. Advanced practice nursing, with emphasis on theories and research related to prevention, detection, health history/risk assessment, cancer diagnosis and staging, treatment, rehabilitation, oncologic emergencies, genetics, and psychosocial issues to provide emotional and family-focused care related to solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. In-depth investigation of symptom management (nausea and vomiting, dyspnea, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction, anemia, immunosuppression, anxiety, depression). Evidence-based practice guidelines provide comprehensive review of health promotion, acute, chronic, and late effects, and psychological concepts in long-term survivorship. Letter grading.

  • 216A. Adult/Gerontology Concepts for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in Acute Care I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 200, 231. Corequisite: course 224. Course 216A is requisite to 216B, which is requisite to 216C. Assessment and management of health problems affecting adult/gerontology population from late adolescence to senescence in acute care settings. Synthesis of knowledge from advanced courses in pathophysiology, pharmacotherapeutics, health promotion, and evidence-based psychosocial care and cultural constraints. Letter grading.

  • 216B. Adult/Gerontology Concepts for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in Acute Care II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 200, 216A, 224, 231. Assessment and management of health problems affecting adult/gerontology population from late adolescence to senescence in acute care settings. Synthesis of knowledge from advanced courses in pathophysiology, pharmacotherapeutics, health promotion, and evidence-based psychosocial care and cultural constraints. Letter grading.

  • 216C. Adult/Gerontology Concepts for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses in Acute Care III

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 200, 216A, 216B, 224, 231. Assessment and management of health problems affecting adult/gerontology population from late adolescence to senescence in acute care settings. Synthesis of knowledge from advanced courses in pathophysiology, pharmacotherapeutics, health promotion, and evidence-based psychosocial care and cultural constraints. Letter grading.

  • 218A. Nursing Administration Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Synthesis and evaluation of organizational theory in leadership and management of healthcare organizations, with emphasis on organizational structure, processes, and outcomes. Letter grading.

  • 218B. Nursing Administration Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 218A. Focus on synthesizing organizational and management theories in relation to strategic planning and management, changing care delivery systems, human and financial resource management, decision making, management information systems, professional practice, and meeting accreditation and legal standards. Letter grading.

  • 218C. Nursing Administration Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 218B. Project management, organizational communication, governance, development and change, diverse relationships within organizations, risk management, liability, and ethics of administration decision making. Emphasis on issues affecting local, national, and international healthcare management. Letter grading.

  • 218D. Nursing Administration Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 218C. Community healthcare needs, political action and healthcare policy, marketing, and media. Planning for future continuous personal and professional growth. Emphasis on issues affecting local, national, and international healthcare management and policy development. Letter grading.

  • 219A. Essentials of Accounting and Budgeting in Healthcare Organizations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Theories of management, organization, and administration presented in relation to techniques of accounting, budgeting, finance, and healthcare economics. Focus on definition of terms and concepts, followed by practical applications within variety of healthcare settings. Letter grading.

  • 219B. Operations Planning and Control for Nursing Administrators

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 219A. Concepts, issues, and analytic techniques of budget formulation, decision making, variance analysis, financing in healthcare, models for forecasting productivity determinations, and program planning and evaluation for nurse administrators. Emphasis on practical methods and techniques within wide variety of healthcare situations. Letter grading.

  • 220. Theories of Instruction and Learning in Nursing

    Units: 3

    Lecture, two hours. Theories of learning, curriculum and program development, and principles and techniques of evaluation. Examination of educator role of advanced practice nurse in variety of settings and with diverse cultural and socioeconomic groups. Opportunities provided for skill development in use of computer-based information systems and development of instructional aids. Letter grading.

  • M221. Qualitative Research Design and Methodology for Indigenous Communities

    Units: 5

    (Same as American Indian Studies M202 and Health Policy and Management M202.) Seminar, three hours. Introduction to some key theoretical themes in American Indian studies and exploration of methods that can be used to incorporate them in research on American Indian cultures, societies, languages, and other issues. Quantitative methods (design, appropriate use), with emphasis on qualitative research methods, ethics, and special considerations in conducting research in American Indian country. Design of research and exploration of feasibility of researching topics. Letter grading.

  • 223. Childhood Development: Research and Application to Nursing

    Units: 3

    Lecture, three hours. Critique and evaluation of current research and theory in child development and their application to care of children. Provides scientific basis for understanding human growth and development, anticipating problems, and managing barriers to growth and development throughout childhood. Letter grading.

  • 224. Advanced Pharmacology for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses

    Units: 5

    Lecture, five hours. Requisite: course 231. In preparation for prescriptive authority, focus on major drug classes and their mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects, and clinical uses. Advanced knowledge of and skills in pharmacology for clients/patients with stable acute or chronic conditions. Letter grading.

  • 225A. Advanced Pharmacology I

    Units: 3

    Lecture, three hours. Course 225A is requisite to 225B. Emphasizes basic pharmacological principles in addition to clinical knowledge and skills necessary for patient-centered care with stable acute or chronic conditions. Focus on major pharmacological classes, their mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, indications, and adverse effects. Discussion of quality and safety of pharmacological interventions in clinical practice, with emphasis on collaborative teamwork (i.e. nurses, physicians, pharmacists) and evidence-based practice (e.g. current guidelines). Letter grading.

  • 225B. Advanced Pharmacology II

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Requisite: course 225A. Emphasizes basic pharmacological principles in addition to clinical knowledge and skills necessary for patient-centered care with stable acute or chronic conditions. Focus on major pharmacological classes, their mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, indications, and adverse effects. Discussion of quality and safety of pharmacological interventions in clinical practice, with emphasis on collaborative teamwork (i.e. nurses, physicians, pharmacists) and evidence-based practice (e.g. current guidelines). Letter grading.

  • 226. Seminar: Aging Research

    Units: 1 to 2

    Seminar, two hours. Preparation: completion of first-year coursework. Discussion and conceptualization of gerontological nursing concepts within context of specialty areas of research (acute care, oncology, occupational health, and gerontological nursing). Provides opportunity for students to integrate gerontological nursing concepts into their evolving dissertation research and to examine state of science in their areas of focus. Core faculty from all specialty areas participate in discussions. May be repeated for maximum of 10 units. S/U grading.

  • 227. Ethnogeriatric Nursing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 209. Identification of unique content related to minority aging using Giger and Davidhizar Transcultural Assessment Model. Examination of transcultural nursing viewed as culturally competent practice that is both client centered and research focused. Exploration of difference between Eurocentric lens and geroethnic lens when providing nursing care to ethnically and racially diverse elders. In-depth examination of issues related to conducting research with elders who are racially and ethnically diverse in variety of healthcare settings. Study designs for conducting research, issues surrounding informed consent of minority elders, and data collection techniques, including critique and use of data collection instruments used in community and long-term care settings, behavioral observations, interviews, and surveys. Letter grading.

  • 228. Research Methods for Aging Populations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 204, 205A, 207. Corequisite: course 208. In-depth examination of issues related to conducting research with elders in variety of healthcare settings. Study designs for conducting research in community and long-term care settings, issues surrounding informed consent, planning for mortality and morbidity, data collection techniques for frail elders, including use of assessment tools used in community and long-term care settings, behavioral observations, interviews, and surveys, and statistical analysis techniques related to missing data, longitudinal data analysis, clustering, and repeated measures. Letter grading.

  • 229A. System-Based Healthcare I

    Units: 1

    Seminar, two hours. System-based healthcare where students focus on context of medical decision making, including team, hospital, culture, politics, economics, law, and personal bias. Topics include legal, political, and moral aspects of sexual assault and abortion; economics and cultural considerations involved in end of life decision making; and public and personal interpretation of what constitutes conflict of interest. Consideration of how medical decisions are influenced by context of care (system-based practice) and emotional responses and preferences (professionalism). S/U grading.

  • 229B. System-Based Healthcare II

    Units: 1

    Seminar, two hours. System-based healthcare where students focus on context of medical decision making, including team, hospital, culture, politics, economics, law, and personal bias. Topics include legal, political, and moral aspects of sexual assault and abortion; economics and cultural considerations involved in end of life decision making; and public and personal interpretation of what constitutes conflict of interest. Consideration of how medical decisions are influenced by context of care (system-based practice) and emotional responses and preferences (professionalism). S/U grading.

  • 229C. System-Based Healthcare III

    Units: 1

    Seminar, two hours. System-based healthcare where students focus on context of medical decision making, including team, hospital, culture, politics, economics, law, and personal bias. Topics include legal, political, and moral aspects of sexual assault and abortion; economics and cultural considerations involved in end of life decision making; and public and personal interpretation of what constitutes conflict of interest. Consideration of how medical decisions are influenced by context of care (system-based practice) and emotional responses and preferences (professionalism). S/U grading.

  • 230A. Advanced Pathophysiology I

    Units: 3

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 3, 13, or equivalent taken within last three years. Course 230A is requisite to 230B. In-depth examination of general pathophysiological processes that underlie human illness and disease across all body systems including cellular adaptation, fluid and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance, immunity, inflammation, infection, wound healing, genetics, neoplasms, temperature regulation, somatosensory and pain processing, stress and disease, and activity and fatigue regulation. Detailed study and analysis of manifestations of, and responses to, processes of cellular and molecular pathology at extracellular, system and human levels. Letter grading.

  • 230B. Advanced Pathophysiology II

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Requisite: course 230A. In-depth examination of pathophysiological processes that underlie human illness and disease, with detailed study of these in major body systems. Examination of manifestations of, and responses to, processes of cellular and molecular pathology at cellular, tissue, system, and human levels. Letter grading.

  • 231. Advanced Pathophysiology for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. In-depth examination of pathophysiological processes that underlie human illness and disease, with detailed study of these in major body systems. Analysis of manifestations of, and responses to, processes of cellular and molecular pathology at extracellular, system, and human levels with implications for advanced practice registered nursing. Letter grading.

  • 232. Human Responses to Aging and Chronic Illness

    Units: 2 or 4

    Lecture/discussion, four hours. Pathophysiologic concepts and nursing management of older adults who are healthy or who have disability and/or chronic illness. Nursing aspects of selected dysfunctions and implications for advanced practice in gerontological nursing. Letter grading.

  • 233. Human Responses to Aging and Chronic Illness

    Units: 2 or 4

    Lecture/discussion, four hours. Biopsychosocial concepts and nursing management of healthy, disabled, and/or chronically ill older adults, addressing pathophysiological aspects of common health problems. Implications for advanced practice in gerontological nursing. Letter grading.

  • 236. Pediatric Primary Care for Family Nurse Practitioners

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 200. Preparation of family nurse practitioners to assume responsibility for health promotion and illness prevention, and maintenance and management of common developmental, behavioral, acute, and chronic health problems of infants, children, and adolescents in primary healthcare settings. Presentation of condition or disease, etiology and incidence, clinical findings, differential diagnosis, pharmacologic and treatment management, complications, and preventive and patient education measures. Examination of primary child health delivery model reliant on evidence-based knowledge, practice protocols, consultation, referral, and community resources. Letter grading.

  • 238A. Assessment and Management in Pediatric Healthcare I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 200. Anticipatory guidance for children and families to promote child wellness and assessment, diagnosis, and management of common pediatric illnesses. Demonstration of application and evaluation of evidence-based research and clinical guidelines in pediatric population. Letter grading.

  • 238B. Assessment and Management in Pediatric Healthcare II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 238A. Assessment, diagnosis, and management of common pediatric illnesses. Demonstration of application and evaluation of evidence-based research and clinical guidelines in pediatric population. Letter grading.

  • 238C. Assessment and Management in Pediatric Healthcare III

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 238B. Assessment, diagnosis, and management of chronic and acute pediatric illnesses. Demonstration of application and evaluation of evidence-based research and clinical guidelines in pediatric population. Letter grading.

  • 239A. Adult/Gerontology Primary Healthcare for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 200, 224, 231. Course 239A is requisite to 239B, which is requisite to 239C. Assessment, diagnosis, and management of common episodic and chronic adult health problems and conditions, including urgent care, for family and adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioners. Application and evaluation of evidence-based interventions and clinical guidelines in diverse adult populations (late adolescence through old age). Analysis of health promotion, maintenance, and restoration approaches in special populations, including developmental, cultural, gender, life-stage perspectives, and functional impairment. Letter grading.

  • 239B. Adult/Gerontology Primary Healthcare for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 239A. Assessment, diagnosis, and management of common episodic and chronic adult health problems and conditions, including urgent care, for family and adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioners. Application and evaluation of evidence-based interventions and clinical guidelines in diverse adult populations (late adolescence through old age). Analysis of health promotion, maintenance, and restoration approaches in special populations, including developmental, cultural, gender, life-stage perspectives, and functional impairment. Letter grading.

  • 239C. Adult/Gerontology Primary Healthcare for Advanced Practice Registered Nurses III

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 239B. Assessment, diagnosis, and management of common episodic and chronic adult health problems and conditions, including urgent care, for family and adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioners. Application and evaluation of evidence-based interventions and clinical guidelines in diverse adult populations (late adolescence through old age). Analysis of health promotion, maintenance, and restoration approaches in special populations, including developmental, cultural, gender, life-stage perspectives, and functional impairment. Letter grading.

  • 241. Biobehavioral Foundations of Neuropsychiatric Assessment

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Biologic and behavioral theories and research from variety of disciplines, including nursing, for application to neuropsychiatric assessment and diagnosis. Exploration of theory and research evidence underlying assessment and diagnosis of cognitive, addictive, and affective dysfunctions, with emphasis on developing behavioral nursing approach. Letter grading.

  • 241F. Biobehavioral Foundations of Neuropsychiatric Assessment

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Biologic and behavioral theories and research from variety of disciplines, including nursing, for application of neuropsychiatric assessment and diagnosis. Exploration of research underlying assessment and diagnosis of cognitive, addictive, and affective dysfunctions, with emphasis on developing a behavioral nursing approach. Letter grading.

  • 242. Biobehavioral Foundations of Neuropsychiatric Nursing Care

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Concepts and principles of working with individuals and groups using psychotherapeutic nursing practices. Discussion of evolution of these modalities in nursing practice, as well as theory and research evidence underlying treatment of individuals with cognitive and attention deficits and thought, addictive, and mood disorders, with emphasis on developing unified approach to management of biobehavioral symptoms in advanced nursing practice. Letter grading.

  • 242F. Biobehavioral Foundations of Neuropsychiatric Nursing Care

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Biologic and behavioral research from variety of disciplines, including nursing, for application to treatment of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. Exploration of research underlying treatment interaction in cognitive, addictive, and affective dysfunctions, with emphasis on developing a biobehavioral nursing approach. Letter grading.

  • 245. Theoretical Foundations of Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice

    Units: 4

    Lecture/discussion, four hours. Theoretical foundations of clinical nurse specialist practice, including systems theory, behavioral theories, consultation theory, change theory, and models of research utilization. Emphasis on application of relevant theories to clinical nurse specialty practice roles in healthcare systems through case-study analysis, with focus on application to clinical practice settings which include culturally diverse populations. Letter grading.

  • 249. Meeting Health-Related Needs in Underserved Populations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Examination of systematic barriers within healthcare settings that limit access to those in greatest need of culturally appropriate interventions. Unmet healthcare needs often result in health disparities and compromised quality of life among underserved, low income, uninsured, marginalized populations. Analysis of current evidence-based strategies and interventions designed to address these clinical problems and improve outcomes in culturally competent manner. Presentation of context of healthcare financing, limited access, and public policy. Letter grading.

  • 250. Ethical Issues, Social Justice, and History of Nursing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, five hours. Interplay of social, economic, cultural, legal, and political forces in the U.S. form background for study of ethical issues related to role of nurses as advocates for social justice and safe, effective, high-quality patient-centered care in contemporary society today. Analysis situated within context of history of nursing, with emphasis on human rights, civil rights, and patient rights. Discussion of evolution of professional nursing within healthcare arenas in relation to ethical principles, cultural competence, evidence-based practice, and human diversity. Letter grading.

  • 252A. Health Promotion: Growth and Development in Culturally Diverse Populations

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered 252.) Lecture, two hours. Introduction to primary prevention strategies as they pertain to health and wellness across lifespan, using population-based approach to nursing care of diverse populations. Includes priorities in reproductive health including issues related to contraception and parenting; well-child care, school-age health, and chronic illness prevention strategies for young and middle-aged adults and elderly who live independently in communities or within institutions. Analysis of influence of overarching political, societal, and governmental systems within U.S. Letter grading.

  • 252B. Health Promotion: Nutrition

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Critical graduate-level analysis of primary prevention strategies involving nutrition using population-based and clinical approaches to nursing care of diverse populations. Nutrition is considered in relation to prevention of disease and recovery from disease. Covers biological, public health, and clinical aspects of major macro- and micronutrients, obesity, malnutrition, dietary assessment, nutritional therapies, and exercise using candidate disease approach. Examination of influences of overarching political, societal, and governmental systems within U.S. and outside U.S. on observed nutritional patterns. Letter grading.

  • 254A. Theoretical Foundations of MSN/MECN Role and Fundamentals of Professional Nursing Lecture/Clinical Skills Practicum I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Focus on theoretical foundations of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention as they relate to nursing care management in acute care settings for master's entry clinical nurse (MECN). Emphasis on application of relevant theories to MECN practice roles in health care systems through case study analysis, with focus on application to clinical practice settings that include culturally diverse populations. Introduction to concepts of communication, nursing process as clinical decision-making strategy, and critical thinking skills as essential to practice of professional nursing. Learning experiences in nursing skills laboratory and in clinical settings. Introduction to mathematical calculations and terminology used in clinical setting. Letter grading.

  • 254B. Theoretical Foundations of MSN/MECN Role and Fundamentals of Professional Nursing Lecture/Clinical Skills Practicum II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 174, 230A, 254A. Continuation of course 254A. Expansion of student knowledge on practice of professional nursing as theory-based goal-directed method for assisting patients to meet basic human needs at various levels of health continua. Concepts of communication, interdisciplinary communication and collaboration, interpersonal relationships, cultural competence, and nursing process with critical thinking skills as clinical decision-making strategies essential to practice of professional nursing. Characteristics and roles of professional nursing. Development of caregiver, teacher, and collaborator roles in learning experiences in nursing skills laboratory and clinical settings. Continued work on mathematical calculations and terminology with addition of intravenous (IV) drip medication calculations used in clinical setting. Letter grading.

  • C255. Global Health Elective: Globalization, Social Justice, and Human Rights

    Units: 3

    Seminar, two hours. Exploration of theories, issues, debates, and pedagogy associated with globalization, social justice, and human rights and how these perspectives influence human health and well-being. Provides students with unique opportunity to explore these topics within classroom, via Internet and other technologies, and in other classrooms located around globe. Students, through collaborative projects with peers around world, reflect on how globalization shapes and transforms local communities and national cultures. Concurrently scheduled with course C155. Letter grading.

  • 260. Secondary Prevention

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 252A, 252B. Review of theory and evidence-based secondary prevention screening strategies for early detection of disease to reduce morbidity and mortality across lifespan and to develop nursing care interventions. Use of integrated conceptual frameworks addressing individual, family, community, health care systems factors, social environmental systems, and policies to identify factors influencing screening and resulting health disparities in order to adapt plans for care. Nursing interventions for promoting screening address barriers and facilitators, controversies, as well as utilize existing strengths and supportive mechanisms tailored to populations. Discussion and application of specific micro-level factors including screening for physical health and mental health disorders along with associated behavioral factors and macro-level, built environment influences. Letter grading.

  • 264. Professional Role Issues in Advanced Practice Registered Nursing

    Units: 3

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 418A or 438A or 439A. Assessment of organizational, legal, ethical, and healthcare policy issues in relation to delivery of healthcare services by advanced practice registered nurses in evolving healthcare system. Letter grading.

  • 266. Healthcare Systems/Organizations

    Units: 3

    Lecture, three hours. Analysis of evolving healthcare delivery systems in terms of effects of policy, economic factors, structure and financing of organizations, characteristics of patients/populations, and services provided, all of which shape reform in relation to role and practice of clinical nurse leaders. Letter grading.

  • 267. Health Care Policy

    Units: 3

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: for MECN students, courses 266, 268, 269; for dual NP/CNS students, courses 245, 269, 445. Analysis of health care policies and how policies impact patient outcomes, clinical practice, health care delivery, and clinician well-being. Concepts related to policy making, formulating health care policy, how to affect political processes, and stakeholder involvement in policy decision making and implementation. Development of understanding of increasing levels of public, governmental, and third party participation in and scrutiny of health care system. Discussion of assembly bills effect on nursing. Emphasis on clinical nurse leader role in health policy and advocacy. Satisfies course requirement for CNL certification. Letter grading.

  • 268. Leadership in Health Care Systems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 250, 465A, 465B. Discussion of use of systems theory in providing patient-centered value-added care. Health care practitioners learn to use critical thinking and decision making to coordinate and deliver quality, cost-effective patient care. Discussion of different modes of organizing nursing care within micro-, meso-, and macro-levels of health care systems; managing care within multidisciplinary team framework; and promoting effective teamwork that enhances patient outcomes, improves staff efficiency, and reduces costs. Emphasis on system theory, problem solving and decision making, nursing care delivery models, delegation, and team strategies in relation to clinical nurse leader. satisfies course requirement for CNL certification. Letter grading.

  • 269. Quality Improvement and Population-Based Quality of Practice

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 268, 465A, 465B, 465C. Focus on principal elements related to quality improvement theories and ways in which quality management impacts delivery of patient-centered and value-driven care. Discussion of concepts including improving system performance, efficient use of fiscal resources, quality improvement, and patient-population quality practice at organizational level. Review of methods to improve patient-care outcomes such as organizational support, effective teamwork, and quality improvement. Emphasis on quality management, patient safety, mitigating chances of adverse outcomes, evidence-based practice, cost-effective decision making, resource management, and external impacts on quality control. Satisfies course requirement for CNL certification. Letter grading.

  • 288. Variable Topics in Nursing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Variable topics; consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M290A. Child Abuse and Neglect

    Units: 2

    (Same as Community Health Sciences M245A, Dentistry M300A, Education M217G, Law M281A, Medicine M290A, and Social Welfare M203F.) Lecture, two hours. Course M290A is requisite to M290B, which is requisite to M290C. Intensive interdisciplinary study of child physical and sexual abuse and neglect, with lectures by faculty members of Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health and Departments of Education and Psychology, as well as by relevant public agencies. Letter grading.

  • M290B. Child Abuse and Neglect

    Units: 2

    (Same as Community Health Sciences M245B, Dentistry M300B, Education M217H, Law M281A-M281B, Medicine M290A-M290B, and Social Welfare M203G.) Lecture, two hours. Requisite: course M290A. Intensive interdisciplinary study of child physical and sexual abuse and neglect, with lectures by faculty members of Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health and Departments of Education and Psychology, as well as by relevant public agencies. Letter grading.

  • M290C. Child Abuse and Neglect

    Units: 1

    (Same as Community Health Sciences M245C, Dentistry M300C, Education M217I, Law M281B, Medicine M290B, and Social Welfare M203H.) Lecture, two hours. Requisite: course M290B. Intensive interdisciplinary study of child physical and sexual abuse and neglect, with lectures by faculty members of Schools of Dentistry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health and Departments of Education and Psychology, as well as by relevant public agencies. Letter grading.

  • 295A. Grant Writing I: Scientific Proposal Development

    Units: 3

    Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 202, 205A, 206A, 210A, 210B, Biostatistics 100B. Introduction to grant writing, with focus on preparing application for National Student Research Award (NRSA) or similar award. Discussion of requirements of various extramural and specialty organization funding sources and identification of evaluation criteria. Emphasis on role of external funding to facilitate doctoral and postdoctoral research, research activities, and professional development. Letter grading.

  • 295B. Nursing Science Seminar

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Requisite: course 295A. Introduction to grant writing, with focus on preparing applications for National Student Research Award. Discussion of requirements of various extramural and specialty organization funding sources, and evaluation criteria identified. Role of external funding to facilitate doctoral and postdoctoral research, research activities, and professional development. S/U grading.

  • 295C. Nursing Science Seminar

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Requisite: course 295A. Introduction to grant writing, with focus on preparing applications for National Student Research Award. Discussion of requirements of various extramural and specialty organization funding sources, and evaluation criteria identified. Role of external funding to facilitate doctoral and postdoctoral research, research activities, and professional development. S/U grading.

  • M298. Interdisciplinary Response to Infectious Disease Emergencies: Nursing Perspective

    Units: 4

    (Same as Community Health Sciences M256, Medicine M256, and Oral Biology M256.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Designed to instill in professional students ideas of common emergency health problems and coordinated response, with specific attention to bioterrorism. Examination of tools to help students prevent, detect, and intervene in infectious disease emergencies. Interdisciplinary sessions also attended by students in Schools of Dentistry, Medicine, and Public Health during weeks two through five. Letter grading.

  • 299A. Ethical Conduct in Research

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Examination of historical and current issues of ethical integrity at each stage of research process in relation to conflicts of interest, data sharing, responsible authorship, data management, and handling of misconduct in research with both human and animal subjects. Systematic instruction on ethical and responsible conduct of research and protection of research subjects as students create their own application for research. Letter grading.

  • 299B. Nursing Research Mentorship

    Units: 1

    Seminar/discussion, one hour; research/laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 202, 205A, 206A, 206B, 207, 208, 210A, 210B, 295A, Biostatistics 100A, 210A. Special topics course for doctoral students who have completed required coursework and are preparing to advance to doctoral candidacy. Discussion topics range from identifying areas of research/laboratory experiences, and engagement in planning for and evaluation of students' mentored experiences on weekly basis. Letter grading.

  • 299C. Nursing Research/Laboratory Experiences

    Units: 4

    Seminar/discussion, one hour; research/laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 202, 206. Seminars and research/laboratory-based experiences to assist students to prepare for careers as scientists, with focus on research methodology and mentorship. S/U grading.

  • 299D. Nursing Education Seminar

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; discussion, one to two hours. Seminar to assist students to prepare for careers in academic settings, with focus on teaching. S/U grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 401. Scientific Underpinnings for DNP Practice

    Units: 3

    Lecture/seminar, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Develops critical thinking skills of DNP students in evaluating state of nursing science and its impact on advanced nursing practice at doctoral level. Introduction and exploration of role of DNP in broader health care environment and correlation to advanced practice nursing roles. Discussion of scientific theories and conceptual frameworks forming foundations of knowledge and clinical scholarship in doctoral nursing practice. Theoretical concepts and strategies that integrate practice inquiry into various roles of advanced practice nurse incorporated throughout course. Emphasis placed on professional writing competencies as related to scientific underpinnings for DNP practice. Letter grading.

  • 402. Clinical Scholarship for Evidence-Based Practice

    Units: 3

    Lecture/seminar, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Designed to provide DNP students with skills to critically appraise and translate evidence into practice. Evidence-based practice appraisal frameworks are used to promote understanding of scientific information and support critical decision-making in health care. Students learn to formulate clinically relevant focused question(s) that guide their DNP project proposal. Letter grading.

  • 403. Organizational and Systems Leadership for Quality Improvement

    Units: 3

    Lecture/seminar, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Provides interdisciplinary background in sciences of quality improvement and patient safety within health care settings. Addresses history and evolution of quality movement, theories and thought leaders, current quality of care issues, eliminating health disparities, culturally and linguistically appropriate services, research and innovations, intervention strategies, and instruments, as well as analysis of quality management system models in health care. Evaluation of principles of change theory, strategic planning, organizational culture, program development and implementation. Special focus placed on role of DNP leader in developing and leading clinical quality and safety initiatives. Letter grading.

  • 404. Analytical Methods for Evidence-Based Practice

    Units: 3

    Lecture/seminar, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Advanced concepts on research methods and measurement strategies that are applicable to support advanced practice nurse to access, evaluate, and utilize data from various sources including research, quality improvement initiatives, and information technology origins to achieve improvements in care delivery and practice. Letter grading.

  • 405. Communication and Ethics for DNP Practice

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Introduction to organizational leadership and ethics in context of interdisciplinary practice in complex health care systems. Letter grading.

  • 406. Clinical Prevention and Population Health

    Units: 3

    Lecture/seminar, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Enables DNP students to integrate, synthesize, and apply key concepts introduced in previous coursework in order to incorporate core components into practice. Evidence-based practice, clinical preventive service and health promotion, health systems and policy, and population health and community aspects of practice are emphasized through focus on current health issues. Letter grading.

  • 407. Financial Management and Cost Analysis of Health Care

    Units: 3

    Lecture/seminar, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Designed to expose DNP students to foundational understanding of how health care is financed in U.S. Exploration of various types of health care organizations and delivery systems. Health care finance is discussed at national, state, and specific health care agencies. Letter grading.

  • 408. Interprofessional Collaboration for Improving Patient and Population Health Outcomes

    Units: 3

    Lecture/seminar, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Designed to acquaint DNP students with contemporary issues in health care professions and expose students to interprofessional collaborative practice concepts and competencies. Debate of barriers and facilitators to achieving model collaborative practice. Exploration of innovative opportunities to change current practice. Exploration of students' personal belief systems about high-level collaboration and team performance. Addresses relationship between interprofessional education, practice, and health care outcomes and processes to prepare DNP graduate to assume leadership roles. Letter grading.

  • 409. Health Care Policy for Advocacy in Health Care

    Units: 3

    Seminar, three hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Focuses on critical analysis of health policy in support of strategic action and advocacy. Covers health policy analysis within context of economic, legal, social justice, and ethical issues and stimulates debate for decision-making and action. Students partner with professional and/or community agencies to apply and evaluate health policy interventions and policies related to current health care issues. Health policy framework is analyzed from governmental, institutional, and organizational perspective. Letter grading.

  • 410. Dissemination and Translation of Clinical Scholarship

    Units: 2

    Lecture/seminar, two hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Students develop DNP competency through presentation of their DNP scholarly project, self-reflection through career plan, and critical evaluation of their DNP program. Letter grading.

  • 411. Information Technology for Nursing Practice

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Requisite: doctoral standing. Prepares students to obtain knowledge and skills related to information technology and patient care technology. Prepares DNP graduates to apply new knowledge, manage individual and aggregate information, and assess efficacy of patient care technology appropriate to specialized area of practice. Allows students to use information technology/system resources to implement quality improvement initiatives, support practice administrative decision-making. Students gain ability to demonstrate conceptual and technical skills to develop and execute evaluation plan involving data extraction from practice systems and databases. Letter grading.

  • 414A. Clinical Practicum: Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Oncology Nurse Practitioners

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 16 hours. Enforced requisite: course 416C. Course 414A is enforced requisite to 414B. Assessment and therapeutic interventions in oncology settings with diverse acute adult/gerontology populations. Management of cancer risk, cancer- and treatment-related side effects, rehabilitation, health promotion, and palliative care. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 414B. Clinical Practicum: Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Oncology Nurse Practitioners

    Units: 8

    Clinic practicum, 22 hours. Enforced requisite: course 414A. Assessment and therapeutic interventions in oncology settings with diverse acute adult/gerontology populations. Management of cancer risk, cancer- and treatment-related side effects, rehabilitation, health promotion, and palliative care. Students complete minimum of 200 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 416A. Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum I

    Units: 2

    Clinic practicum, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 440. Course 416A is enforced requisite to 416B. Assessment and therapeutic interventions for selected health problems in acute adult/gerontology populations. Developmental, health promotion, and maintenance needs of clients in relation to family, social, and cultural structures. Students complete minimum of 40 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 416B. Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum II

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 16 hours. Enforced requisite: course 416A. Assessment and therapeutic interventions for selected health problems in acute adult/gerontology populations. Developmental, health promotion, and maintenance needs of clients in relation to family, social, and cultural structures. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 416C. Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum III

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 16 hours. Enforced requisite: course 416B. Course 416C is enforced requisite to 416D. Assessment and therapeutic interventions for selected health problems in acute adult/gerontology populations. Developmental, health promotion, and maintenance needs of clients in relation to family, social, and cultural structures. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 416D. Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum IV

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 16 hours. Enforced requisite: course 416C. Assessment and therapeutic interventions for selected health problems in acute adult/gerontology populations. Developmental, health promotion, and maintenance needs of clients in relation to family, social, and cultural structures. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 416E. Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum V

    Units: 6 to 8

    Clinic practicum, 15 to 24 hours. Enforced requisite: course 416D. Assessment and therapeutic interventions for selected health problems in acute adult/gerontology populations. Developmental, health promotion, and maintenance needs of clients in relation to family, social, and cultural structures. Students complete minimum of 160 to 240 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 418A. Nursing Administration Practicum

    Units: 3 to 4

    Clinic practicum, eight or 11 hours; clinical conference, one hour. Requisites: courses 219A, 219B. Synthesis, evaluation, and practical application of organizational theory in practice setting, with emphasis on content presented in course 218A, including organizational structure, processes, and outcomes. Letter grading.

  • 418B. Nursing Administration Practicum

    Units: 3 to 4

    Clinic practicum, eight or 11 hours; clinical conference, one hour. Requisites: courses 218A, 418A. Experience in organizational setting for synthesizing content from course 218B, including strategic planning and management, care delivery systems, resource management, decision making, management information systems, professional practice, and meeting accreditation and legal standards. Letter grading.

  • 418C. Nursing Administration Practicum

    Units: 3 to 4

    Clinic practicum, eight or 11 hours; clinical conference, one hour. Requisites: courses 218B, 418B. Experience in organizational setting for synthesizing and evaluating content from course 218C, including processes of project management, organizational communication, governance, development and change, diverse relationships within organization, risk management, liability, and ethics of administration decision making. Letter grading.

  • 418D. Nursing Administration Residency

    Units: 12

    Clinic practicum, 33 hours; clinical conference, one hour. Requisites: courses 218C, 418C. Experience in organization setting as students assume leadership role in planning, managing, and evaluating administrative projects. Synthesizing of content from course 218D, including assessing community healthcare needs, marketing, media, and political action and healthcare policy. Letter grading.

  • 429A. Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum I

    Units: 4

    Clinic practicum, 12 hours. Requisites: courses 200, 440. First of five clinical practica designed to prepare family nurse practitioners with knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to assume role of primary healthcare provider for families and individual patients across lifespan. Use of family-focused framework of care for those who experience common acute and chronic illness, developmental transitions, and health problems. Emphasis on health promotion, maintenance, and risk reduction interventions across wide range of diverse populations. Focus on context of community, cultural awareness, and practice in interdisciplinary teams. Students complete minimum of 80 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 429B. Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum II

    Units: 4

    Clinic practicum, 12 hours. Requisite: course 429A. Second of five clinical practica designed to prepare family nurse practitioners with knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to assume role of primary healthcare provider for families and individual patients across lifespan. Use of family-focused framework of care for those who experience common acute and chronic illness, disability, and developmental transitions. Emphasis on health promotion, maintenance, and risk reduction interventions across wide range of diverse populations. Preparation in variety of clinical settings to implement evidence-based practice guidelines and to critically analyze and adapt healthcare interventions based on individualized assessments of individual/family needs. Focus on context of community, cultural awareness, and practice in interdisciplinary teams. Students complete minimum of 80 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 429C. Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum III

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 18 hours. Requisite: course 429B. Third of five clinical practica designed to prepare family nurse practitioners with knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to assume role of primary healthcare provider for families and individual patients across lifespan. Use of family-focused framework of care for those who experience common acute and chronic illness, disability, and developmental transitions. Preparation in variety of clinical settings to implement evidence-based practice guidelines and to critically analyze and adapt healthcare interventions based on individualized assessments of individual/family needs. Focus on context of community, cultural awareness, and practice in interdisciplinary teams. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 429D. Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum IV

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 18 hours. Requisite: course 429C. Fourth of five clinical practica designed to prepare family nurse practitioners with knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to assume role of primary healthcare provider for families and individual patients across lifespan. Use of family-focused framework of care for those who experience common acute and chronic illness, disability, and developmental transitions. Preparation in variety of clinical settings to implement evidence-based practice guidelines and to critically analyze and adapt healthcare interventions based on individualized assessments of individual/family needs. Focus on context of community, cultural awareness, and practice in interdisciplinary teams. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 429E. Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum V

    Units: 9

    Clinic practicum, 27 hours. Requisite: course 429D. Fifth of five clinical practica designed to prepare family nurse practitioners with knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to assume role of primary healthcare provider for families and individual patients across lifespan. Use of family-focused framework of care for those who experience common acute and chronic illness, disability, and developmental transitions. Preparation in variety of clinical settings to implement evidence-based practice guidelines and to critically analyze and adapt healthcare interventions based on individualized assessments of individual/family needs. Focus on context of community, cultural awareness, and practice in interdisciplinary teams. Students complete minimum of 240 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 438A. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Clinical Practicum I

    Units: 4

    Clinic practicum, 12 hours. Corequisite: course 238A. Comprehensive assessment and anticipatory guidance for children and families to promote child wellness. Clinical practicum, seminar, and other learning activities to demonstrate application and evaluation of evidence-based research and clinical guidelines in promotion of pediatric wellness. Students complete minimum of 100 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 438B. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Clinical Practicum II

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 18 hours. Corequisite: course 238B. Advanced comprehensive assessment, diagnosis, and management of common pediatric illnesses and developmental and/or behavioral problems. Clinical practicum, seminar, and other learning activities to demonstrate application and evaluation of evidence-based research and clinical guidelines in common pediatric illnesses. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 438C. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Clinical Practicum III

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 18 hours. Corequisite: course 238C. Advanced comprehensive assessment, diagnosis, and management of chronic and acute pediatric illnesses in ambulatory setting. Clinical practicum, seminar, and other learning activities to demonstrate application and evaluation of evidence-based research and clinical guidelines in pediatric chronic and acute illnesses. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 438D. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Clinical Practicum IV

    Units: 8

    Clinic practicum, 24 hours. Requisites: courses 238C, 438C. Students assume primary responsibility for assessment, diagnosis, management, and evaluation of care provided to children and families in ambulatory setting. Clinical practicum, seminar, and other learning activities to demonstrate application and evaluation of evidence-based research and clinical guidelines in pediatric health problems. Students complete minimum of 220 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 439A. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum I

    Units: 4

    Clinic practicum, 12 hours. Requisites: courses 224, 231. Corequisite: course 239A. Advanced practice nursing in adult/gerontology. Beginning-level assessment and therapeutic interventions for health problems in selected populations. Developmental, health promotion, and maintenance needs of clients in relation to family, social, and cultural structures. Students complete minimum of 80 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 439B. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum II

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 18 hours. Requisite: course 439A. Corequisite: course 239B. Continuation of course 439A for advanced practice nurses, with emphasis on nursing management of acute and chronic health problems in selected populations. Developmental needs of clients in relation to family, social, and cultural structures. Students complete minimum of 80 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 439C. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum III

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 18 hours. Requisite: course 439B. Corequisite: course 239C. Third clinical practicum course for advanced practice nurses, with focus on nursing assessment and intervention in common illness-associated symptoms and complex patient/family presentations. Analysis, evaluation, and integration of current theory and research to provide basis for development of interventions and treatment for acute and chronic problems across lifespan. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 439D. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum IV

    Units: 6

    Clinic practicum, 18 hours. Requisites: courses 239C, 439C. Residency in advanced practice role where students assume primary responsibility for planning, managing, and evaluating care of clients in specialty setting. Emphasis on application and integration of theory, research, and clinical knowledge in advanced practice role. Students complete minimum of 160 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 439E. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Practicum V

    Units: 9

    Clinic practicum, 27 hours. Enforced requisites: courses 439A through 439D. Designed to prepare adult/gerontology primary care nurse practitioners with knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary to assume role of primary healthcare providers for young adults, adults, and older adults. Use of patient-centered framework of care for those who experience common acute and chronic illness, disability, and developmental transitions. Preparation in variety of clinical settings to implement evidence-based practice guidelines and to critically analyze and adapt healthcare interventions based on individualized assessments, with emphasis on context of community, cultural awareness, and practice in interdisciplinary teams. Students complete minimum of 240 direct clinical hours. Letter grading.

  • 440. Advanced Assessment and Clinical Diagnosis for Advanced Practice Nurses

    Units: 2

    Laboratory/clinic practicum, six hours. Practice foundations for advanced physical assessment and clinical diagnostic reasoning. Students conduct individualized patient- and symptom-focused assessments of health problems representative of diverse client populations. Emphasis on comprehensive and integrated critical analysis of symptom and focused history data, physical examination, selected laboratory data, and clinical diagnoses. Letter grading.

  • 444. Adult/Gerontology Acute Advanced Assessment and Clinical Diagnosis II

    Units: 2

    Clinic practicum, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 440. Practice foundations for advanced physical assessment and clinical diagnostic reasoning, with focus on diagnostic or therapeutic procedures and related indications, complications, and follow-up care in laboratory setting. S/U grading.

  • 445. Advanced Practice Registered Nursing: Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum

    Units: 2 to 10

    Clinic practicum, six to 30 hours. Requisites: courses 220, 245. Practicum/residency where students gain skills and competencies to function collaboratively and autonomously to achieve high quality patient outcomes. Clinical nurse specialty (CNS) practice achieves this by working within three spheres of influence: patient/family, nursing personnel, and organizational systems utilizing multidisciplinary approach through application and integration of theory, research, and clinical knowledge. 17 units complete minimum of 500 unique CNS hours required for professional certification. Letter grading.

  • 450. Advanced Practice Registered Nursing: Clinical Elective Independent Study

    Units: 2 to 8

    Clinic practicum, eight hours. Clinical elective designed to enhance skills and competencies in student-selected advanced practice specialty or related practice dimension, with emphasis on application and integration of theory and evidence-based practice knowledge. S/U grading.

  • 461. Mental Health Nursing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, six hours. Requisites: courses 252A, 252B, 260, 465B. Knowledge development and skill assessment to promote mental health of individuals and communities. Exploration of research underlying assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of individuals with psychiatric disorders and pharmacotherapeutic and psychological treatment of individuals. Application of theory in clinical interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating course of care for patients, both as individuals and cohorts. Letter grading.

  • 462. Maternity Nursing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, six hours. Requisites: courses 204, 260, 465A, 465B. Pathophysiological and psychosocial aspects of assessment and management for selected acute and emergent problems of maternity-newborn patients, with emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences and integration of basic knowledge of pathophysiology, diagnostics, pharmacology, therapeutic interventions, and communication concepts as applied to care of childbearing families. Application of theory, nursing process, evidence-based practice, and problem solving in clinical setting, interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating care for maternity and newborn patients, both as individuals and cohorts. Assessment, health maintenance, and management of symptomatology among childbearing women and newborns. Letter grading.

  • 463. Nursing Care of Geriatric Patients and Families

    Units: 3

    Lecture, two hours; clinical, one hour. Requisites: courses 252A, 252B, 465A. Addresses prevention and management of acute and chronic health problems of older adults. Theory content emphasizes assessment, goal setting, treatment planning, and evaluation of nursing care of older adults and their families with emphasis on psychosocial, cultural, and developmental influences. Students integrate knowledge of pathophysiology, pharmacology, stress and adaptation, adult development theory, therapeutic interventions, and communication concepts as applied to care of older adult patients and their families. Emphasis on concept of nurse as nurse scientist with critical and contextual thinking skills and diagnostic reasoning. Nursing process, ethical principles, clinical research, evidenced-based practice, and clinical thinking that maximize patient safety and quality care for older adults are employed during clinical experiences. Letter grading.

  • 464. Pediatric Nursing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, six hours. Requisites: courses 204, 260, 465A, 465B. Nursing assessment and management of acute, chronic, critical, and emergent illnesses in pediatrics with emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of knowledge of pathophysiology, diagnostics, pharmacology, therapeutic interventions, family-centered care, and ethical and legal principles as applied to pediatrics. Students demonstrate leadership, evidence-based practice, problem-solving, and critical thinking strategies to improve patient safety, care quality, and health outcomes. Supervised practicum experience within setting of multidimensional team in clinical interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating nursing care in pediatrics. Effective communication, teamwork, and collaboration with disciplines across complex health care systems. Integration of information management and technology to facilitate effective communication and support clinical decision making. Letter grading.

  • 465A. Foundational Concepts for Tertiary Prevention and Care of Medical-Surgical Patients and Families

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; clinical, three hours. Requisites: courses 174A, 230A, 250, 254A. Examination of nursing assessment and management of common health problems of adults. Theory content in basic assessment, health history, and diagnostic reasoning for selected health problems, with emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of basic knowledge of pathophysiology, stress and adaptation, adult development theory, therapeutic interventions, and communication concepts as applied to care of medical and surgical patients and their families across adult lifespan. Introduction to concept of nurses as bedside scientists, with emphasis on critical and contextual thinking skills and diagnostic reasoning. Nursing process, ethical principles, clinical research, evidence-based practice, and clinical thinking that maximize patient safety and quality care employed during clinical experiences. Letter grading.

  • 465B. Tertiary Prevention and Care of Medical-Surgical Patients and Families

    Units: 6

    Lecture, four hours; clinical, six hours. Requisites: courses 225A, 230A, 230B, 252A, 252B, 254B, 465A. Pathophysiological and psychosocial aspects of assessment and management for selected acute and emergent problems of adult patients with complex illness including multifaceted assessment, health history, and diagnostic reasoning skills, and emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of knowledge of pathophysiology, diagnostics, pharmacology, therapeutic interventions, patient safety, evidence-based practice, and communication concepts as applied to care of medical-surgical patients. Supervised practicum experience within settings of multidisciplinary teams directing care of medical-surgical clinical units, with focus on clinical interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating course of care for patients, both as individuals and cohorts. Letter grading.

  • 465C. Tertiary Prevention and Care of Complex Medical-Surgical Patients and Families

    Units: 8

    Lecture, four hours; clinical, 12 hours. Requisites: courses 204, 260, 465B. Examination of nursing assessment and management of acute and chronic health problems of acutely ill adults. Theory content in assessment, health history, and diagnostic reasoning with emphasis on social, cultural, and developmental influences. Integration of knowledge of pathophysiology, pharmacology, stress and adaptation, adult development theory, therapeutic interventions, patient safety, evidence-based practice, and communication concepts as applied to care of acutely ill medical-surgical patients, with complex and comorbid conditions, and their families. Concept of nurses as bedside scientists, with emphasis on critical and contextual thinking skills and diagnostic reasoning. Nursing process, ethical principles, clinical research, evidence-based practice, and clinical thinking that maximize patient safety and quality care for acutely ill adults employed during clinical experiences. Letter grading.

  • 465D. Human Responses to Critical Illness

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; fieldwork, three hours. Requisites: courses 461, 462, 464, 465A, 465B, 465C. Pathophysiological and psychosocial concepts in acute life-limiting illness and nursing management of critically ill adults, with focus on effect of critical illness on individual and family health. Key diagnostic and therapeutic modalities that promote effective nursing management of individuals with complex critical illnesses addressed. Emphasis on rapid assessment, critical reasoning, prompt intervention, and outcome achievement with fluid replanning for rapidly changing disease conditions. Letter grading.

  • 467. Clinical Internship: Integration

    Units: 12

    Clinical, 36 hours. Requisites: courses 268, 461, 462, 463, 464, 465A, 465B, 465C. Supervised practicum experience within clinical setting as part of interdisciplinary health care team, with focus on application of theory in clinical setting and interpretation of assessment and diagnostic data for purpose of planning, implementing, and evaluating course of care for patients, both as individuals and cohorts. Students design and complete quality improvement project that contributes to unit's goals and objectives. Students implement advanced-level assessment, health maintenance, and management of symptology across lifespan. S/U grading.

  • 470A. DNP Scholarly Project Course I: Project Conceptualization and Planning

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours; clinical, four hours. Requisites: courses 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 408. Preparation: successful completion of first year of DNP didactic coursework. DNP students gain knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to develop evidence-based project proposal and plan, which addresses practice issue affecting chosen microsystem. Provides structured didactic content and application of student's DNP scholarly project. Letter grading.

  • 470B. DNP Scholarly Project Course II: Project Proposal

    Units: 8

    Lecture, two hours; clinical, six hours. Requisite: course 470A. DNP students develop full DNP scholarly project proposal that reflects synthesis of student's knowledge from prior coursework and work in area of interest or expertise under direction of faculty mentor. Provides structured didactic content and application of student's DNP scholarly project. Letter grading.

  • 470C. DNP Scholarly Project Course III: Project Implementation

    Units: 8

    Lecture, two hours; clinical, six hours. Requisite: course 470B. Continued development of knowledge, skills, and abilities to implement chosen DNP scholarly project proposal. Students assume role of leadership in interprofessional collaboration, consultation, and partnership. Students receive direction from faculty committee chair and peer feedback as they become engaged in microsystem where they implement their DNP scholarly project. Provides structured didactic content and application of student's DNP scholarly project. Letter grading.

  • 470D. DNP Scholarly Project Course IV: Project Evaluation

    Units: 8

    Lecture, two hours; clinical, six hours. Requisite: course 470C. Students complete evidence-based DNP scholarly project. Students complete implementation phase, evaluate project, and write final DNP scholarly project manuscript. Students receive individual direction from faculty committee chair and peer feedback as final DNP scholarly project paper is written. Students are also mentored in making professional presentations and writing for publication. Letter grading.

  • 495. Nursing Education Practicum

    Units: 2

    Seminar, six hours. Supervised student teaching internship in preparation for academic roles. In-depth opportunity to gain skills in role of nurse educator within university setting, including application of instructional strategies and evaluation methods. S/U grading.

  • 496A. Education Practicum in Nursing Practice I

    Units: 1

    Activity, one hour; discussion, one hour. Corequisites: courses 401, 402. Focuses on development and implementation of patient education program. Prepares DNP students for teaching roles in variety of different health care settings. Emphasis on application of educational program structure, content, appropriate curriculum development, methods of teaching and evaluation that can be applied in variety of different settings in which DNP advanced practices nurses teach. In progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of courses 496B and 496C).

  • 496B. Education Practicum in Nursing Practice II

    Units: 1

    Activity, one hour; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 496A. Focuses on development and implementation of patient education program. Prepares DNP students for teaching roles in variety of different health care settings. Emphasis on application of educational program structure, content, appropriate curriculum development, methods of teaching and evaluation that can be applied in variety of different settings in which DNP advanced practices nurses teach. In progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 496C).

  • 496C. Education Practicum in Nursing Practice III

    Units: 1

    Activity, one hour; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 496B. Focuses on development and implementation of patient education program. Prepares DNP students for teaching roles in variety of different health care settings. Emphasis on application of educational program structure, content, appropriate curriculum development, methods of teaching and evaluation that can be applied in variety of different settings in which DNP advanced practices nurses teach. Letter grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual Study or Research

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Opportunity for individual graduate nursing students to pursue special studies or research interests. May be repeated for credit, but only 4 units may be applied toward graduate degree requirements. S/U grading.

  • 597. Individual Study for Comprehensive Examination

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Opportunity for individual graduate nursing students to prepare for comprehensive examination. May be repeated once for credit, but only 4 units may be applied toward M.S.N. degree requirements. S/U grading.

  • 599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Individualized faculty supervision of Ph.D. dissertation research by student's chair. May be repeated for credit, but only 8 units may be applied toward Ph.D. degree requirements. S/U grading.