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   Schedule of Classes   Official Notices

Auditing Classes

Class Attendance

Class Notes

Disclosure of Student Records

Emergencies

Examination Policies

Harassment

Mobile Phone and Pager Policy

Nondiscrimination

Official Publications

Plagiarism and Student Copyright

Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct

Student Conduct Policies

Updated June 2, 2014

The Office of the Dean of Students publishes Official Notices in the Daily Bruin at various times during the year. Such notices are important, and all students are held responsible for the information in them.

Auditing Classes

With the consent of the instructor, registered students and interested individuals are permitted to audit classes. Arrangements are made directly with the faculty member under any rules the faculty member may establish, and those auditing ordinarily do not participate in discussions, examinations, or written papers. Audited classes are not recorded on the Study List or on transcripts for regular session courses.

Class Attendance

Class rosters, which identify enrolled or wait-listed students, are available online to each instructor through MyUCLA. Attendance in UCLA classes is limited to duly enrolled regular session or concurrent University Extension students. Guests may attend lectures only with the approval of the instructor. Students may be dropped from a course for academic reasons such as lacking the approved requisites and requirements (SR542). If attendance is an academic requirement established by the instructor, students may be dropped from a course because of excessive absences.

Class Notes

Notes or recordings made by students are for purposes of individual or group study or for other noncommercial purposes reasonably arising from the student’s membership in the class or the University. Permission to make notes or recordings falls within the instructor’s discretion as informed by instructional purposes, classroom order, property interests, or other reasonable issues arising in the academic context. Notes and recordings may not be exchanged or distributed for commercial purposes, for compensation, or for any other purpose other than study, either between students or between a student(s) and a third party. Unless authorized by the University in advance and explicitly permitted by the instructor, commercial use of class notes or recordings constitutes an unauthorized commercial activity in violation of the UCLA Regulations on Activities, Registered Campus Organizations, and Use of Properties, Section IV, Paragraph A (see the PDF on the Student Activities website). Students who violate this policy are subject to University discipline.

Further, AB 1773 was signed into law on September 23, 2000, to be effective January 1, 2001. This State law amended the California Education Code as follows:

66450. (a) Except as authorized by policies developed by the University in accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 66452, no business, agency, or person, including, but not necessarily limited to, an enrolled student shall prepare, cause to be prepared, give, sell, transfer, or otherwise distribute or publish, for any commercial purpose, any contemporaneous recording of an academic presentation in a classroom or equivalent site of instruction by an instructor of record. The prohibition applies to a recording made in any medium, including but not necessarily limited to, handwritten or typewritten class notes.

The full text of AB 1773, including a description of civil penalties and the legal and financial remedies available to the University and an individual instructor for violations of this State law, can be found on the Official California Legislative Information website. This notice has been prepared for distribution to all UCLA students as requested by AB 1773.

Individual instructors retain intellectual property rights in lecture material, pursuant to U.S. copyright law and California Civil Code 980(a)(1). Misuse of course notes derived from lecture material may also subject an individual to legal proceedings brought by the instructor.

Pursuant to the guidelines reviewed by the UCLA Academic Senate (1973), lecture note subscription services are permitted, if authorized in advance by the University and if approved by the instructor. The Lecture Notes service offered by the Associated Students UCLA is currently authorized by the University to provide a course notes subscription service for particular classes. For such classes, the note taker is approved in advance by the instructor, and the instructor may review the notes before their distribution and sale through the UCLA Store Lecture Notes office in Ackerman Union. The list of classes with such a subscription service is available in Ackerman Union.

Nothing in this policy precludes an instructor from posting the course lecture notes, which they prepare or authorize to be prepared, on the UCLA-provided course website for the class, which the instructor controls. Students who are permitted by the instructor to review such course lecture notes are reminded that these policies apply to their use of any such course lecture notes posted on the course website by the instructor.

Disclosure of Student Records

Pursuant to the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the California Information Practices Act, and the University of California Policies Applying to the Disclosure of Information from Student Records, students at UCLA have the right to

  1. Inspect and review records pertaining to themselves in their capacity as students, except as the right may be waived or qualified under federal and state laws and University policies
  2. Have withheld from disclosure, absent their prior written consent for release, personally identifiable information from their student records, except as provided by federal and state laws and University policies
  3. Inspect records maintained by UCLA of disclosures of personally identifiable information from their student records
  4. Seek correction of their student records through a request to amend the records or, if such request is denied, through a hearing (see UCLA Procedure 220.1)
  5. File complaints with the U.S. Department of Education regarding alleged violations of the rights accorded them by the FERPA

UCLA, in accordance with federal and state laws and University policies, has designated the following categories of personally identifiable information as "public information" which UCLA may release and publish without the student’s prior consent: name, address (mailing, permanent, and e-mail), telephone numbers, major field of study, dates of attendance, grade level, number of course units in which enrolled, degrees and honors received, the most recent previous educational institution attended, participation in officially recognized activities (including intercollegiate athletics), and the name, weight, and height of participants on intercollegiate athletic teams.

As a matter of practice, UCLA does not publish student addresses or telephone numbers in the campus electronic directory unless released by the student. The term “public information” in this policy is synonymous with the term “directory information” in FERPA.

Students who do not wish certain items (i.e., name, mailing, permanent, and/or e-mail address, telephone numbers, major field of study, dates of attendance, number of course units in which enrolled, and degrees and honors received) of this "public information" released and published may so indicate through MyUCLA. To restrict the release and publication of the additional items in the category of "public information," complete the UCLA FERPA Restriction Request form available from the Registrar’s Office, 1113 Murphy Hall.

Student records which are the subject of federal and state laws and University policies may be maintained in a variety of offices, including the Registrar’s Office, Office of the Dean of Students, UCLA Career Center, UCLA External Affairs, Graduate Division, and the offices of a student’s College or school and major department. Students are referred to the online UCLA Campus Directory which lists all the offices that may maintain student records, together with their campus address and telephone number. Students have the right to inspect their student records in any such office subject to the terms of federal and state laws and University policies. Inspection of student records maintained by the Registrar’s Office is by appointment only and must be arranged three working days in advance. Call (310) 825-1091 option 6 or inquire at the Registrar’s Office, 1113 Murphy Hall.

A copy of federal and state laws, University policies, and the print UCLA Telephone Directory may be inspected in the office of Information Practices, 500 UCLA Wilshire Center. Information concerning students’ hearing rights may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students, 1206 Murphy Hall. See the complete text of UCLA Policy 220 Disclosure of Information from Student Records.

In addition to the “public information” described above, information related to students’ sex and marital status, and the name(s), address(es), and telephone number(s) of their parents or next of kin, are made available to the UCLA External Affairs Department for use in alumni, development, and public relations activities. To restrict the release of this additional information, complete an External Affairs Information Restriction Request form available from the Registrar’s Office, 1113 Murphy Hall.

Emergencies

At UCLA, 911 is the all-purpose emergency phone number. You do not need to call an outside line from a campus phone, and you do not need any coins to call 911 from a pay phone. If you are calling from a mobile phone, call (310) 825-1491. When you call, try to remain calm and do not hang up until you answer all of the operator’s questions.

Students should be familiar with safety instructions posted in classrooms, laboratories, and other campus facilities. Be prepared to respond safely and appropriately to a fire, earthquake, toxic spill, or accident. See the UCLA Emergency Management website for an emergency preparedness checklist.

You may also obtain general instructions during a major emergency by calling the 24-hour emergency information line at (800) 900-UCLA.

Students receive emergency e-mail alerts through BruinAlert. For mofre information, see “BruinAlert” in the UCLA Online section or the BruinAlert website.

Here are some general guidelines for specific emergencies:

Accident and Injury

Call 911 from a campus phone or (310) 825-1491 from a mobile phone immediately to get assistance. If you are qualified to do so, give first aid to injured persons. Do not attempt to move the seriously injured.

Earthquake

When an earthquake hits, take cover immediately. If you are indoors, get under a desk or table, or between seating rows in a lecture hall. DO NOT RUN OUTSIDE. If you are in a hallway or outdoors, move to an open area quickly and drop to the ground, covering your head and neck. If you are in a car, stop carefully and stay in the car.

After the shaking stops, check for injuries. Do not use telephones for personal calls, as this overloads phone lines and prevents emergency personnel from reporting injuries. After a severe quake at UCLA, department heads and emergency coordinators will lead building evacuations. Do not use elevators. Go to campus evacuation areas, which are wide open spaces such as the quads, athletic fields, and uncovered parking lots. See the UCLA Emergency Management website for a campus evacuation map. Wait for instructions before entering buildings or parking structures. Refrain from spreading rumors and do not go sightseeing. Remain calm and help others.

Fire

If you see a fire, close the door where the fire is located, activate the nearest alarm, and call 911 from a campus phone or (310) 825-1491 from a mobile phone immediately. When you sound the alarm or hear the alarm signal, get out of the building as quickly and calmly as possible. Do not use elevators. Do not re-enter the building until the all-clear signal has been given by emergency personnel. All fires must be reported.

UCLA does not expect students or employees to fight fires. Use a fire extinguisher only if you are trained and feel it is safe to do so. Be aware of campus fire alarm and extinguisher locations.

Hazardous Spill

Do not attempt to clean up any hazardous material spill involving chemical, radioactive, infectious, or flammable materials unless you have suitable training. If a spill occurs in a classroom or laboratory, alert the supervisor or laboratory manager. If the spill happens outdoors or in an unsupervised area, call the EH&S hotline at (310) 825-9797 or 911 from a campus phone, or (310) 825-1491 from a mobile phone.

Examination Policies

Midterm Examinations

UCLA Policy 870, II (B) 6: Midterm examinations are expected to be held during regularly-scheduled class meeting times. However, large classes with multiple sections requiring a common midterm examination can schedule examinations outside regular class meeting times on a space-available basis with the following limitations:

  1. Notice of the midterm dates and times must be published in the Schedule of Classes and MyUCLA before enrollment begins. Late requests will not be scheduled.
  2. Instructors must put the midterm examination dates in the course syllabus.
  3. Instructors must announce the midterm dates on the 1st day of class and inform students that it is acceptable to request alternate times.
  4. Instructors should make a good faith effort to accommodate alternate examinations times for students with course conflicts.
  5. To comply with Section 92640 of the California Education Code, instructors must accommodate requests for alternate examination dates at a time when that activity would not violate a student’s religious creed. See UCLA Policy 870, Section II (B) 8, Alternate Examination Dates.

Final Examinations

UCLA Policy 870, II (B) 7: An instructor’s method of evaluation must be announced at the beginning of the Course. Final written examinations may not exceed three hours’ duration and are given only at the times and places established and published by the department chair and the Registrar’s Office. See UCLA Senate Regulation A-332 (A) for the policy on final examinations.

Final examinations are generally held in the same room as Class meetings; however, by prior arrangement with the Registrar’s Office, common final examinations can be scheduled and extra room locations may be booked on a space-available basis. Changes in classroom location must be arranged through the Registrar’s Office. Examination codes, times, and locations are listed in the online Schedule of Classes and MyUCLA.

Instructors must submit grades no later than 10 days afte the last day of finals for Fall, Winter, and Spring terms, and no later than 10 days after the last day of any given Summer Session.

Alternate Examination Dates

UCLA Policy 870, II (B) 8: No student shall be excused from assigned final examinations except as provided in Senate Regulation A332 or in Section 92640 of the California Education Code policy on alternate examinations. The University must accommodate requests for alternate examination dates at a time when that activity would not violate a student’s religious creed. This requirement does not apply in the event that administering the test or examination at an alternate time would impose an undue hardship which could not reasonably be avoided. Accommodation for alternate examination dates are worked out directly and on an individual basis between the student and the faculty member involved.

Faculty members should remember that while it is fully at their discretion to make arrangements with individual students for alternate examination times, including final examinations, they must conduct the scheduled final examination for the Class as a whole at the times and places established by the department chair and the Registrar’s Office.

Harassment

Sexual Harassment

The University of California is committed to creating and maintaining a community where all persons who participate in University programs and activities can work and learn together in an atmosphere free from all forms of harassment, exploitation, or intimidation. Every member of the University community should be aware that the University is strongly opposed to sexual harassment, and that such behavior is prohibited both by law and by University policy. The University will respond promptly and effectively to reports of sexual harassment, and will take appropriate action to prevent, to correct, and if necessary, to discipline behavior that violates this poicy. See the Sexual Harassment Prevention Office website.

Definitions

For detailed definitions of sexual harassment, refer to Section 102.09 of the Student Conduct Code (Code or UCLA Code).

Complaint Resolution

Experience has demonstrated that many complaints of sexual harassment can be effectively resolved through informal intervention.

An individual who believes that she or he has been sexually harassed may contact the Sexual Harassment Coordinator or a Sexual Harassment Information Center counselor for help and information regarding sexual harassment complaint resolution or grievance procedures, or may file a complaint of harassment directly with the appropriate Complaint Resolutions Officer. The appropriate Complaint Resolutions Officer is deterimined by the status of the accused harasser. For further details please contact the Sexual Harassment Coordinator, Pamela Thomason, at (310) 206-3417, 2241 Murphy Hall.

Other Forms of Harassment

The University strives to create an environment which fosters the values of mutual respect and tolerance and is free from discrimination based on race, ethnicity, sex, gender, gender expression, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age, and other personal characteristics. Certainly harassment, in its many forms, works against those values and often corrodes a person’s sense of worth and interferes with one’s ability to participate in University programs or activities. While the University is committed to the free exchange of ideas and the full protection of free expression, the University also recognizes that words can be used in such a way that they no longer express an idea, but rather injure and intimidate, thus undermining the ability of individuals to participate in the University community. The UCLA Code presently prohibits a variety of conduct by students which, in certain contexts, may be regarded as harassment. For detailed definitions of harassment, refer to Section 102.11 of the Code.

Harassing expression which is accompanied by physical abuse, threats of violence, or conduct that threatens the health or safety of any person on University property or in connection with official University functions may subject an offending student to University discipline under the provisions of Section 102.08 of the Code.

Similarly, harassing conduct, including symbolic expression, which also involves conduct resulting in damage to or destruction of any property of the University or property of others while on University premises may subject a student violator to University discipline under the provisions of Section 102.04 of the Code.

Contact, whether physical, verbal, written, face-to-face, telephonic, or by other means, that a student knows or should know is unwanted, which is communicated directly to one or more specific members of the campus community and constitutes severe and/or pervasive, and objectively offensive, conduct, can subject the offending student to University discipline under the provisions of Section 102.27 of the Code.

Further, under specific circumstances described in Section 102.11 of the Code, students may be subject to University discipline for misconduct which may consist solely of expression. Information about this policy is available in the Office of the Dean of Students, 1206 Murphy Hall, or in any of the Harassment Information Centers listed below:

  1. Counseling and Psychological Services, 221 Wooden Center West, (310) 825-0768, http://www.counseling.ucla.edu
  2. Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars, 106 Bradley Hall, (310) 825-1681, http://www.internationalcenter.ucla.edu
  3. Office of Fraternity and Sorority Relations, 105 Kerckhoff Hall, (310) 825-6322, http://www.greeklife.ucla.edu
  4. Office of Ombuds Services, 105 Strathmore Building, (310) 825-7627, http://www.ombuds.ucla.edu
  5. Residential Life, 205 Bradley Hall, (310) 825-3401, https://reslife.ucla.edu

Complaint Resolution

One of the necessary measures in our efforts to assure an atmosphere of civility and mutual respect is the establishment of procedures which provide effective informal and formal mechanisms for those who believe that they have been victims of any of the above misconduct.

Many incidents of harassment and intimidation can be effectively resolved through informal means. For example, an individual may wish to confront the alleged offender immediately and firmly. An individual who chooses not to confront the alleged offender and who wishes help, advice, or information is urged to contact any of the Harassment Information Centers listed immediately above.

In addition to providing support for those who believe they have been victims of harassment, Harassment Information Centers offer persons the opportunity to learn about the phenomena of harassment and intimidation; to understand the formal and informal mechanisms by which misunderstandings may be corrected and, when appropriate, student perpetrators may be disciplined; and to consider which of the available options is the most useful for the particular circumstances.

With regard to Sections 102.11 and 102.27 of the Code, complainants should be aware that not all conduct which is offensive may be regarded as a violation of this Code and may, in fact, be protected expression. Thus, the application of formal institutional discipline to such protected expression may not be legally permissible. Nevertheless, the University is committed to reviewing any complaint of harassing or intimidating conduct by a student and intervening on behalf of the complainant to the extent possible.

Mobile Phone and Pager Policy

Any disruption of a class due to the audible beeping or use of mobile phones will be treated as a violation of Section 102.13 of the UCLA Student Conduct Code and will subject a student to sanctions up to and including suspension or dismissal. Mobile phones must be turned off while in classes, libraries, or other quiet areas.

Nondiscrimination

The University of California, in accordance with applicable federal and state laws and University policies, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity, pregnancy (including pregnancy, childbirth, and medical conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth), physical or mental disability, medical condition (cancer-related or genetic characteristics), ancestry, marital status, age, sexual orientation, citizenship, or service in the uniformed services (including membership, application for membership, performance of service, application for service, or obligation for service in the uniformed services). The University also prohibits sexual harassment. This nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access, and treatment in University programs and activities.

Inquiries regarding the University’s student-related nondiscrimination policies may be directed to the UCLA Campus Counsel, 3149 Murphy Hall, Box 951405, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1405, (310) 825-4042.

Inquiries regarding nondiscrimination on the basis of disability covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 may be directed to the ADA and 504 Compliance Coordinator, A239 Murphy Hall, UCLA, Box 951405, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1405, voice (310) 825-2242, TTY (310) 206-3349, http://www.ada.ucla.edu.

Students may grieve any action which they believe discriminates against them on the ground of race, color, national origin, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, disability, or age by contacting the Office of the Dean of Students, 1206 Murphy Hall. Refer to UCLA Procedure 230.1 (available in 1206 Murphy Hall or at the UCLA Administrative Policies and Procedures website) for further information and procedures.

Official Publications

Students are responsible for observing procedures and deadlines published by the Registrar’s Office in the following publications:

  1. UCLA General Catalog. The catalog includes courses and programs approved by the UCLA Academic Senate. There is no longer a print edition of the Catalog. There are two archival editions of the Catalog: a PDF version and an HTML version. Real-time updates to course descriptions are provided on the Current Course Descriptions page. For the full list of current GE courses, see the General Education Requirements page. See also the complete Catalog.
  2. Schedule of Classes.The Schedule lists classes offered each term. It includes fee charts; academic calendars with key deadline dates; academic policies and procedures; registration, enrollment, and billing information; and official notices. There is no longer a print edition of the Schedule. There are two online versions: an archival PDF and a real-time edition that displays updated class status (open, closed, waitlist, cancelled) and enrollment capacities. The real-time edition also features customized class searches for GE, Fiat Lux, USIE, class units, and instructors. See the Schedule home page.

Plagiarism and Student Copyright

Plagiarism of any form is a violation of UCLA Student Conduct Code (Code or UCLA Code) Section 102.01--Academic Dishonesty. Instructors are permitted to use one or more plagiarism-detection services to assist in the confirmation that the academic work submitted by a student is original work and has not been duplicated from an existing work.

All class assignments are expected to be original works submitted by individual students or, if directed by the instructor, by students working in a team. Should a student purchase or other wise acquire a document from a third party (such as TermPaperExample.com) and submit such a document as original work for the class assignment, such action is plagiarism and a violation of the code.

Instructors may require that all students enrolled in the class submit their work for confirmation by a plagiarism-detection service designated by the instructor. Failure by a student to submit assigned work is the equivalent, at the discretion of the instructor, to the student failing to submit the paper for grading.

Students retain full copyright ownership to their academic work (UCLA Policy 965). However, if the plagiarism-detection service used by the instructor includes a protocol that the vendor retains a copy of the submitted work, such practice is approved by UCLA for the vendor’s sole purpose of comparison with other academic work subsequently submitted by others. The vendor may not use academic work submitted by UCLA students for any other purpose.

Instructors are encouraged to indicate to all students at the start of the academic term whether (a) a plagiarism-detection service will be used in the class for academic assignments; and (b) whether the service will be applied to all students enrolled in the class or on a spot-check basis. Nonetheless, instructors may decide to use a plagiarism-detection service after the start of the academic term, either on an across-the-board or spot-check basis. The instructor’s discretion in such matters is final and not subject to appeal.

Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the UCLA Code. This and other relevant documents are available on the Dean of Students Office website.

The grading process for a student suspected of having engaged in plagiarism or other form of cheating is described in the Academic Senate Manual Regulations, Section 4, Paragraphs A-306 and A-315.

Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct

UCLA does not tolerate sexual assault or sexual misconduct. Where there is probable cause to believe a student has committed a sexual assault or has engaged in sexual misconduct, disciplinary action will be pursued under Sections 102.08 and 102.09 of the UCLA Code. Sanctions may include dismissal from the University.

If a Person Has Been Sexually Assaulted

Those who believe that they are the victims of sexual assault should

  1. Immediately call the police department. If possible, call the UCLA Police Department at (310) 825-1491 or 911
  2. Get medical attention. Campus police will provide transportation to the Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center Emergency Room for emergency medical treatment and evidence collection. A counselor from the Rape Treatment Center will be available at that time, free of charge

Utilize campus and community support services:

  1. Contact a Campus Assault Resources and Education (CARE) Counselor at the Counseling and Psychological Services. Confidential CARE counselors have expertise in working with people who have been sexually assaulted. They can discuss options and alternatives, help identify the most appropriate support services, and provide information about medical care, psychological counseling, academic assistance, legal options, how to file a police report, and how to file a complaint through the Office of the Dean of Students. CARE counselors are available to assist any UCLA student regardless of where or when the assault occurred. For assistance, contact the Counseling and Psychological Services at (310) 825-0768 or go to Wooden West and ask to speak to a CARE counselor.
  2. Contact the Rape Treatment Center at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center (310-319-4000) for free emergency medical treatment and counseling services. See http://www.911rape.org.

Caring assistance is available for persons who have been subjected to sexual assault or sexual misconduct. They are encouraged in the strongest terms to make a report. Student CARE managers are available for support and advocacy at (310) 825-7291, (310) 794-7299, and (310) 825-0628.

Student Conduct Policies

Students are members of both society and the academic community with attendant rights and responsibilities. Students are expected to make themselves aware of and comply with the law, and with University and campus policies and regulations. While many of UCLA’s policies and regulations parallel federal, state, and local laws, UCLA’s standards may be set higher. The University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students (UC Policies) have been incorporated into the UCLA Student Conduct Code either by adapting or inserting verbatim the language of the policies. The complete University of California Policies Applying to Campus Activities, Organizations, and Students is available at the UC Student Affairs policies website. Students may contact the Office of the Dean of Students or Student Legal Services for advice concerning these policies.

A. Jurisdiction

The University has jurisdiction over student conduct that occurs on University property, or in connection with official University functions whether on or off University property. The University may, at its sole discretion, exercise jurisdiction over student behavior that occurs off campus and that would violate student conduct policies or regulations when

  1. the alleged misconduct indicates the student poses a threat to the safety or security of any member(s) of the University community; or
  2. the alleged misconduct involves academic work or the forgery, alteration or misuse of any University document, record, key, electronic device, or identification.

In determining whether or not to exercise off-campus jurisdiction, the University will consider the seriousness of the alleged misconduct; whether an alleged victim is a member of the campus community; the ability of the University to gather information, including the statements of witnesses; and whether the off-campus conduct is part of a series of actions that occurred both on and off campus.

B. Types of Misconduct

Students may be held accountable for committing or attempting to commit a violation of the UCLA Code or for assisting, facilitating, or participating in the planning of an act that violates this Code (or an act that would be in violation of this Code if it were carried out by a student). Violations include the following types of misconduct:

102.01: Academic Dishonesty. All forms of academic misconduct or research misconduct, including but not limited to cheating, fabrication or falsification, plagiarism, multiple submissions, or facilitating academic misconduct. For the purposes of the UCLA Code, the following definitions apply:

102.01a: Cheating. Cheating includes, but is not limited to, the use of unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic exercise; the alteration of any answers on a graded document before submitting it for regrading; or the failure to observe the expressed procedures or instructions of an academic exercise (e.g., examination instructions regarding alternate seating or conversation during an examination).

102.01b: Fabrication. Fabrication includes, but is not limited to, falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise, including fabrication or falsification of research. Fabrication of research is making up data or results and recording or reporting them. Falsification of research is manipulating research materials, equipment, or processes, or changing or omitting data or results such that the research is not accurately represented in the research record.

102.01c: Plagiarism. Plagiarism includes, but is not limited to, the use of another person’s work, (including words, ideas, designs, or data) without giving appropriate attribution or citation. This includes, but is not limited to, representing, with or without the intent to deceive, part or all of an entire work obtained by purchase or otherwise, as the student’s original work; the omission of or failure to acknowledge the true source of the work; or representing an altered but identifiable work of another person or the student’s own previous work as if it were the student’s original or new work.

Unless otherwise specified by the faculty member, all submissions, whether in draft or final form, to meet course requirements (including a paper, project, exam, computer program, oral presentation, or other work) must either be the Student’s own work, or must clearly acknowledge the source.

102.01d: Multiple Submissions. Multiple submissions includes, but is not limited to, the resubmission in identical or similar form by a student of any work which has been previously submitted for credit, whether at UCLA or any other school, college, or university in one course to fulfill the requirements of a second course, without the informed permission/consent of the instructor of the second course; or the submission for credit of work submitted for credit, in identical or similar form, in concurrent courses, without the permission/consent of the instructors of both courses.

102.01e: Facilitating Academic Dishonesty. Facilitating academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, knowingly helping another student commit an act of academic dishonesty.

102.01f: Coercion Regarding Grading or Evaluation of Coursework. Threatening personal or professional repercussions or discipline against an instructor to coerce the instructor to change a grade or otherwise evaluate the student's work by criteria not directly reflective of coursework.

102.01g: Unauthorized Collaboration. Unauthorized collaboration means working with others without the expressed permission of the instructor on any submission, whether in draft or final form, to meet course requirements (including a paper, project, take-home exam, computer program, oral presentation, or other work). Collaboration between students will be considered unauthorized unless expressly part of the assignment in question, or expressly permitted by the instructor.

102.02: Other Forms of Dishonesty. Other forms of dishonesty, including but not limited to fabricating information or knowingly furnishing false information or reporting a false emergency to the University.

102.03: Forgery. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any University document, record, key, electronic device, or identification, or submission of any forged document or record to the University.

102.04: Theft, Damage, or Destruction of Property

102.04a: Theft includes taking without expressed permission or misappropriation of any property of the University or property of others while on University premises or at official University functions; or possession of any property that the student had knowledge or reasonably should have had knowledge was stolen.

102.04b: Damage or destruction of any University property or property of others while on University premises or at official University functions.

102.05: Computer Misuse. Theft or abuse of University computers or other University electronic resources such as computer and electronic communications facilities, systems, and services. Abuses include, but are not limited to, unauthorized entry, use, transfer, or tampering with the communications of others; use of either software or physical devices to enroll in classes for yourself or on behalf of others using processes other than those specifically delineated by the UCLA Registrar’s Office; interference with the work of others or with the operation of computer or electronic communications facilities, systems, or services; or violations of copyright laws, whether by theft, unauthorized sharing or other misuse of copyrighted materials such as music, movies, software, photos or text.

Violation of the University of California Electronic Communications Policy (PDF) or of any other University acceptable or allowable use policies.

102.06: Unauthorized Use of University Resources or Name. Unauthorized entry to, possession of, receipt of, or use of any University services, equipment, resources, or properties, including the University’s name, insignia, or seal.

102.07: Violations of University Policy. Students may be subject to discipline for violation of any University policy.

102.07a: University Housing. Violations of policy regarding University-owned, -operated, or
-leased housing facilities or other housing facilities on University property.

102.07b: University Parking. Violations of policy regarding University parking services or University-owned or -operated parking facilities.

102.07c: University Recreation. Violations of policy regarding University recreation services, programs, or within University-owned or -operated recreation facilities.

102.07d: University Identification Card (BruinCard). Violation of policies, regulations, or rules governing use of official University identification cards, including manufacturing or possession of false identification cards, using another person’s BruinCard to obtain services or establish identity, facilitating the misuse of one’s BruinCard by another person to obtain services or establish identity, or other misuse of the BruinCard.

102.08: Conduct that Threatens Health or Safety. Conduct that threatens the health or safety of any person, including but not limited to physical assault, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, threats that cause a person reasonably to be in sustained fear for one’s own safety or the safety of her or his immediate family, incidents involving the use or display of a weapon likely to cause great bodily harm, and intoxication or impairment through the use of alcohol or controlled substances to the point one is unable to exercise care for one’s own safety.

Sexual violence is defined as physical sexual acts engaged without the consent of the other person or when the other person is unable to consent to the activity. Sexual violence includes sexual assault, rape, battery, and sexual coercion; domestic violence; dating violence; and stalking.

Domestic violence is defined as abuse committed against an adult or a minor who is a spouse or former spouse, cohabitant or former cohabitant, or someone with whom the abuser has a child, has an existing dating or engagement relationship, or has had a former dating or engagement relationship.

Dating violence is defined as abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.

Sexual assault occurs when physical sexual activity is engaged without the consent of the other person or when the other person is unable to consent to the activity. The activity or conduct may include physical force, violence, threat, or intimidation, ignoring the objections of the other person, causing the other person’s intoxication or incapacitation through the use of drugs or alcohol, or taking advantage of the other person’s incapacitation (including voluntary intoxication).

Consent is defined as follows:

Consent is informed. Consent is an affirmative, unambiguous, and conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.

Consent is voluntary. It must be given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. Consent means positive cooperation in the act or expression of intent to engage in the act pursuant to an exercise of free will.

Consent is revocable. Consent to some form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Consent to sexual activity on one occasion is not consent to engage in sexual activity on another occasion. A current or previous dating or sexual relationship, by itself, is not sufficient to constitute consent. Even in the context of a relationship, there must be mutual consent to engage in sexual activity. Consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual encounter and can be revoked at any time. Once consent is withdrawn, the sexual activity must stop immediately.

Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated. A person cannot consent if she or he is unconscious or coming in and out of consciousness. A person cannot consent if she or he is under the threat of violence, bodily injury or other forms of coercion. A person cannot consent if his/her understanding of the act is affected by a physical or mental impairment.

Incapacitation is defined as the physical and/or mental inability to make informed, rational judgments. States of incapacitation include, but are not limited to, unconsciousness, sleep, and blackouts. Where alcohol or drugs are involved, incapacitation is defined with respect to how the alcohol or other drugs consumed affects a person’s decision-making capacity, awareness of consequences, and ability to make fully informed judgments. Being intoxicated by drugs or alcohol does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain consent. The factors to be considered when determining whether consent was given include whether the accused knew, or whether a reasonable person should have known, that the complainant was incapacitated.

Before final determination of alleged misconduct, interim suspension may be imposed by the Office of the Dean of Students when there is reasonable cause to believe that the student’s participation in University activities or presence at specified areas of campus will lead to physical abuse, threats of violence, or conduct that threatens the health or safety of any person on University property or at official University functions, or other disruptive activity incompatible with the orderly operation of the campus.

The Code prohibits retaliation against a person who reports sexual misconduct or dating or domestic violence, assists someone with a report of sexual misconduct or dating or domestic violence, or participates in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a sexual misconduct or dating or domestic violence report. Retaliation includes threats, intimidation, reprisals, and/or adverse actions related to employment or education.

102.09: Sexual Harassment. Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment is conduct that explicitly or implicitly affects a person’s education or interferes with a person’s educational performance or creates an environment such that a reasonable person would find the conduct intimidating, hostile, or offensive. Sexual harassment includes sexual misconduct (see section 102.08) and stalking (see section 102.10). The University will respond to reports of any such conduct in accordance with the University of California Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence (PDF).

Sexual harassment may include incidents between any members of the University community, including faculty and other academic appointees, staff, student employees, students, coaches, residents, interns, and non-student or non-employee participants in University programs (e.g., vendors, contractors, visitors, and patients).

Sexual harassment may occur in hierarchical relationships, between peers, or between individuals of the same sex or opposite sex.

To determine whether the reported conduct constitutes sexual harassment, consideration shall be given to the record of the conduct as a whole and to the totality of the circumstances, including the context in which the conduct occurred.

Sexual harassment of one student by another student is defined as unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature that is so severe and/or pervasive, and objectively offensive, and that so substantially impairs a person’s access to University programs or activities that the person is effectively denied equal access to the University’s resources and opportunities.

Student Employees: When employed by the University of California, and acting within the course and scope of that employment, an investigation may be completed by the Title IX Officer, or her designee per the University of California Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence. Should an investigation be conducted, a copy of the investigator’s report and the written determination of whether or not sexual harassment occurred will be forwarded to the Dean, who may impose one or more sanctions, as appropriate.

In compliance with UCLA Procedure 630.1, cases involving allegations of sexual harassment must be either resolved by the Dean or heard before the Student Conduct Committee within sixty days of the referral of the complaint. This deadline may be extended on approval from the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs.

This policy prohibits retaliation against a person who reports sexual harassment, assists someone with a report of sexual harassment, or participates in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a sexual harassment report. Retaliation includes threats, intimidation, reprisals, and/or adverse actions related to employment or education.

102.10: Stalking. Stalking is behavior in which a person repeatedly engages in conduct directed at a specific person that places that person in reasonable fear of his or her safety or the safety of others.

This policy prohibits retaliation against a person who reports stalking, assists someone with a report of stalking, or participates in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a stalking report. Retaliation includes threats, intimidation, reprisals, and/or adverse actions related to employment or education.

102.11: Harassment. Harassment is defined as conduct that is so severe and/or pervasive, and objectively offensive, in that so substantially impairs a person’s access to University programs or activities, that the person is effectively denied equal access to the University’s resources and opportunities.

Student and/or employee sexual harassment is governed by the University of California Policy on Sexual Harassment and Sexual Violence and the procedures for responding to sexual harassment. See section 102.09.

Sanctions may be enhanced where an individual was selected for harassment because of the individual’s race, color, national or ethnic origin, citizenship, sex, gender, gender expression, religion, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy, marital status, ancestry, service in the uniformed services, physical or mental disability, or perceived membership in any of these classifications.

102.12: Hazing. Participation in hazing or any method of initiation or preinitiation into a campus organization or other activity engaged in by the organization or members of the organization at any time that causes, or is likely to cause, physical injury or personal degradation or disgrace resulting in psychological harm to any student or other person.

102.13: Obstruction or Disruption. Obstruction or disruption of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary procedures, or other University activities.

102.14: Disorderly Behavior. Engaging in disorderly or lewd conduct.

102.15: Disturbing the Peace. Participation in a disturbance of the peace or unlawful assembly.

102.16: Failure to Comply. Failure to identify oneself to, or comply with directions of, a University official or other public official acting in the performance of her or his duties while on University property or at official University functions, or resisting or obstructing such University or other public officials in the performance of or the attempt to perform their duties.

102.17: Controlled Substances. Manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, use, or sale of, or the attempted manufacture, distribution, dispensing, or sale of controlled substances (including medicinal marijuana), identified in federal and state laws or regulations, which is unlawful or otherwise prohibited by, or not in compliance with, any University policy or campus regulations, or being unable to exercise care for one’s own safety because one is under the influence of controlled substances. NOTE: This provision shall not apply to circumstances wherein the person under the influence was given a controlled substance without his or her knowledge and permission.

102.18: Alcohol. Manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, use, or sale of, or the attempted manufacture, distribution, dispensing, or sale of alcohol, which is unlawful or otherwise prohibited by, or not in compliance with, any University policy or campus regulations, or being unable to exercise care for one’s own safety because one is under the influence of alcohol. NOTE: This provision shall not apply to circumstances wherein the person under the influence was given alcohol without his or her knowledge and permission.

102.19: Destructive Devices. Possession, use, storage, or manufacture of explosives, firebombs, or other destructive devices.

102.20: Weapons and Replica Weapons.

102.20a: Weapons. Except as expressly permitted by law, possession, use, storage, or manufacture of a firearm or other weapon capable of causing bodily injury is prohibited.

102.20b: Replica Weapons. Except as expressly permitted by UCPD policy, possession, use, storage, or manufacture of replicas of firearms or other weapons is prohibited.

102.21: Violation of Disciplinary Conditions. Violation of the conditions contained in the terms of a disciplinary action imposed under the UCLA Code.

102.22: Violation of Interim or Emergency Suspension Conditions. Violation of the conditions contained in a written Notice of Interim or Emergency Suspension issued pursuant to Section IV of the UCLA Code.

102.23: Unauthorized Use or Sale of University Materials. Except as provided herein, no student shall give, sell, or otherwise distribute to others or publish any recording made during any course presentation without the written consent of the University and the instructor/presenter. This policy is applicable to any recording in any medium, including handwritten or typed notes.

Any distribution of a recording of a course presentation at UCLA that captures the actual sounds and/or images of that course presentation, in any medium, must consider not only the rights of the instructor and the University, but also those of other parties. Examples include the privacy rights of students enrolled in the course, the rights of guest lecturers, and the copyright interests in materials authored by others that are displayed or presented during the course presentation. In addition to the consent of the University and the instructor/presenter, it may be necessary to secure permission from these other parties before any recording, distribution, publication, or communication is legally permitted.

102.23a: Selling Academic Materials. Selling, preparing, or distributing for any commercial purpose academic materials including but not limited to written, video, or audio recordings recordings of any course unless authorized by the University in advance and explicitly permitted by the course instructor in writing. The unauthorized sale or commercial distribution of academic materials including but not limited to recordings by a student is a violation of the UCLA Code whether or not it was the student or someone else who prepared the materials. This policy is applicable to any recording in any medium, including handwritten or typed notes.

102.23b: Copying Course Notes. Copying for any commercial purpose handouts, readers, or other course materials provided by an instructor as part of a University of California course unless authorized by the University in advance and explicitly permitted by the course instructor or the copyright holder in writing (if the instructor is not the copyright holder). Students currently enrolled in a course may provide a copy of their own notes or recordings to other currently enrolled students for noncommercial purposes reasonably arising from participation in the course, including individual or group study.

102.23c: Commencement Tickets. Selling commencement tickets.

102.24: Misuse of University Property. Organizing or carrying out unlawful activity on University properties.

102.25: Violations of Law. Students may be subject to discipline on the basis of a conviction under any federal, California state, or local ciminal law, when the conviction constitutes reasonable cause to believe that the student poses a threat to the health or safety of any person, or to the security of any property, on University premises or at official University functions, or to the orderly operation of the campus.

102.26: Terrorizing Conduct. Conduct where the actor means to communicate a serious expression of intent to terrorize, or acts in reckless disrefard of the risk of terrorizing, one or more University students, faculty, or staff. Terrorize means to cause a reasonable person to fear bodily harm or death, perpetrated by the actor or those acting under his/her control. Reckless disregard means consciously disregarding a substantial risk. This section applies without regard to whether the conduct is motivated by race, ethnicity, personal animosity, or other reasons. This section does not apply to conduct that constitutes the lawful defense of oneself, of another, or of property.

102.27: Unwanted Personal Contact. Contact (whether physical, verbal, written, face-to-face, telephonic, electronic, or by other means) that

  1. a student knows or should know is unwanted
  2. is communicated directly to one or more specific students, faculty, or staff
  3. constitutes severe and/or pervasive, and objectively offensive, conduct, and
  4. does not constitute speech protected by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (e.g., speech in a public forum on a matter of public concern).

102.28: Expectation of Privacy. The following are prohibited:

Making a video recording, audio recording, taking photographs, or streaming audio/video of any person in a private location without that person’s knowledge and express consent.

Looking through a hole or opening into, or otherwise viewing, by means of any instrumentality, the interior of a private location without the subject’s knowledge and express consent.

Photographs and recordings made in private locations of sexual activity or that contain nudity may not be posted online or otherwise shared or distributed in any manner without the knowledge and express consent of all recorded parties, even if the photograph or recording was originally made with the knowledge and express consent of those parties.

Making a video recording, audio recording, or streaming audio/video of private, non-public conversations and/or meetings, without the knowledge and express consent of all recorded parties.

“Nudity” means the absence of an opaque covering which covers the genitals, pubic hair, buttocks, perineum, anus or anal region of any person, or any portion of the breast at or below the areola thereof of any female persons.

“Private locations” are settings where the person reasonably expected privacy. For example, in most cases the following are considered private locations: residential living quarters, bathrooms, locker rooms, and personal offices.

“Private, non-public conversations and/or meetings” include any communication carried on in circumstances that reasonably indicate that any party wants the communication to be confined to the parties, but excludes a communication made in a public gathering in which the parties to the communication may reasonably expect that the communication may be overheard or recorded.

“Express consent” is clear, unmistakable, and voluntary consent that may be in written, oral, or nonverbal form.

These provisions do not extend to public events or discussions, nor to lawful official law or policy enforcement activities. These provisions may not be utilized to impinge upon the lawful exercise of constitutionally protected rights of freedom of speech or assembly.

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