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Physics Courses

Lower Division Courses

Students who wish to use physics to satisfy part of the general education requirements in the physical sciences and who have no mathematics background beyond the high school mathematics required for admission to UCLA may take either Physics 10 or 3A if only one course is to be taken, or 3A and 3B as a two-course sequence.

Physics 1Q is intended for entering freshman physics majors and other interested students. Although it is not a required course or a part of or requisite to any general physics sequence of courses, its purpose is to indicate the nature of current research problems in physics on a level intended to be attractive to entering students with a good high school science and mathematics background.

Physics 3A, 3B, 3C form a one-year sequence of courses in general physics (with laboratory). In this sequence only algebra and trigonometry are used in providing a mathematical description of physical phenomena; calculus is not used.

Physics 6A, 6B, 6C form a one-year sequence of courses in basic physics for students in the biological and health sciences. However, unlike Physics 3A, 3B, 3C, calculus is used throughout, and successful completion of basic calculus courses is a requisite for admission to this sequence.

Physics 8A, 8B, 8C, 8D, 8E form a sequence of courses in general physics for majors in physics.

The department takes into account prior preparation in physics. If students feel their background would permit acceleration, they may be exempted from one or more of courses 8A through 8E by taking the final examination with a class at the end of any term. These serve as placement examinations. A satisfactory score on one or both parts of the College Board Advanced Placement Physics C Test may also serve as a placement examination, but placement is not automatic. Students should discuss such possibilities with their departmental adviser.

Physics 10 is a one-term, nonlaboratory course which surveys the whole field of physics. Any two or more courses from Physics 3A, 6A, 8A, and 10 are limited to six units credit.

1Q. Contemporary Physics (2 units). Review of current problems in physics, with emphasis on those being studied at UCLA. Significance of the problems and their historical context. P/NP grading.

3A. General Physics: Mechanics of Solids and Fluids. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: three years of high school mathematics including trigonometry or two years of high school mathematics and one-term college course in mathematics with trigonometry included in the group of courses or equivalent courses. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 8A or equivalent. Fundamentals of classical mechanics: Newton laws; conservation of momentum, angular momentum, energy; Kepler laws; dynamics of systems of particles; fluid mechanics.

3B. General Physics: Heat, Sound, Electricity and Magnetism. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 3A. Temperature, heat, and laws of thermodynamics. Introduction to wave motion, resonance. Sound and acoustics. Electric and magnetic fields. Electric power. Elements of DC and AC circuits.

3C. General Physics: Light, Relativity, and Modern Physics. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 3B. Light, optical instruments. Introduction to relativity. Electron and atom. Matter waves. Nuclear and particle physics.

6A. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Mechanics. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 3A, 3B, 3C (may be taken concurrently).

6B. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Electricity and Magnetism. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 6A.

6C. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Light and Modern Physics. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 6B.

8A. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Mechanics. Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 8AL (corequisite), Mathematics 31A, 31B (corequisite). Recommended: high school physics and chemistry. Motion, Newton laws, work, energy, linear and angular momentum, rotation, equilibrium, gravitation.

8AH. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Mechanics (Honors). Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: Mathematics 31A. Introduction to classical mechanics for engineering and physical sciences students.

8AL. Physics Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers: Mechanics (1 unit). Laboratory, two hours. Enforced corequisite: course 8A. Experiments performed on falling bodies, acceleration on an air track, conservation of energy, and rotational kinematics. State-of-the-art computer data acquisition and analysis, with introduction to error analysis.

8B. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Waves, Sound, Heat. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 8A, 8BL (corequisite), Mathematics 31B, 32A (corequisite). Harmonic oscillators, standing and traveling waves, fluid dynamics, sound, kinetic theory of gases, laws of thermodynamics.

8BH. Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Honors). Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 8A (A or better), Mathematics 31B, 32A (corequisite). Same material as course 8B but in greater depth.

8BL. Physics Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers: Waves, Sound, Heat (1 unit). Laboratory, two hours. Enforced corequisite: course 8B. Experiments performed on harmonic oscillations, standing waves, acoustics, and thermodynamics. Development of error and analysis, including distributions and least-squares fitting procedures.

8C. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Electricity and Magnetism. Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 8B, 8CL (corequisite), Mathematics 32A, 32B (corequisite). Electrostatics: electric field and potential, capacitors and dielectrics. Currents, DC circuits, transients in RC circuits. Magnetism: magnetic fields and forces, Ampere law, Faraday law, magnetic properties of matter. Maxwell equations in integral form. Inductance and transients in RL circuits.

8CH. Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Honors). Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 8BH (or 8B, A or better), Mathematics 32A, 32B (corequisite). Same material as course 8C but in greater depth.

8CL. Physics Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers: Electricity and Magnetism (1 unit). Laboratory, two hours. Enforced corequisite: course 8C. Experiments performed on effects of electric and magnetic fields, resistance, capacitance, time-varying circuits. Use of equipment such as voltmeters, oscilloscopes.

8D. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Electromagnetic Waves, Light, and Relativity. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 8C, 8DL (corequisite), Mathematics 32B, 33A (corequisite). AC circuits, resonance. Maxwell equations in differential form. Electromagnetic waves. Light: reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, polarization. Special theory of relativity.

8DH. Physics for Scientists and Engineers (Honors). Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 8CH (or 8C, A or better), Mathematics 32B, 33A (corequisite). Same material as course 8D but in greater depth.

8DL. Physics Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers: Electromagnetic Waves, Light, and Relativity (1 unit). Laboratory, two hours. Enforced corequisite: course 8D. Experiments performed on reflection, refraction, polarization, diffraction, and interference with light and microwaves. Equipment includes laser, traveling microscope.

8E. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Modern Physics. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisites: course 8D, Mathematics 33A, 33B (corequisite). Wave-particle duality, quantum theory, Schrödinger equation, hydrogen atom, exclusion principle.

10. Physics. Lecture/demonstration, three hours; quiz/discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 3A or 6A or 8A or equivalent course in mechanics. Special mathematical preparation beyond that necessary for admission to University in freshman standing not required. Topics include planetary motion, Newton laws, gravitation, electricity and magnetism, wave motion, light, sound, and heat, relativity, quantum mechanics, atoms, and subatomic particles. As time permits, development of physical ideas placed in cultural and historical perspective.

88. Lower Division Seminar: Current Topics in Physics (2 units). Limited to freshmen/sophomores. Intensive exploration of a particular theme or topic based on current research. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in a specific term. P/NP or letter grading:

M88. Limits of Biological Design through Physical Principles. (Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M88H.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 6A, 6B, and 6C, or 8A, 8B, 8C, and 8D, Chemistry 10A and 10B, or 11A and 11B, Life Sciences 1, 3, Mathematics 3A, 3B, and 3C, or 31A, 31B, and 32A. Specific examples of diverse biological design such as scaling of metabolic activity, bone and muscle mass, cell size, cell membranes and pumps, heart and blood circulation, swim bladders, insect vision, magnetic bacteria, etc., studied quantitatively using elementary mathematics and physical principles.

Upper Division Courses

Requisites for all upper division courses (except Physics 105A, 116): Physics 8A through 8E, Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, and 33B, or consent of instructor. It is recommended that students take the 180 laboratories in their senior year.

105A. Analytic Mechanics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: Mathematics 32A. Corequisite: Mathematics 32B. Newtonian mechanics and conservation laws, gravitational potentials, calculus of variations, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, central force motion, linear and nonlinear oscillations.

105B. Analytic Mechanics. Prerequisite: course 105A. Relativity with four vectors, noninertial reference frames, dynamics of rigid bodies, coupled oscillators, normal modes of oscillation, vibrating strings, and wave propagation.

108. Optical Physics. Prerequisite: course 110B. Interaction of light with matter; dispersion theory, oscillator strength, line widths, molecular scattering. Coherence theory, Kirchhoff formulation of diffraction theory, crystal optics, optical rotation, electro and magneto optical effects. Additional topics of fundamental or current interest.

110A. Electricity and Magnetism. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: course 131. Electrostatics and magnetostatics.

110B. Electricity and Magnetism. Prerequisite: course 110A. Faraday law and Maxwell equations. Propagation of electromagnetic radiation. Multipole radiation and radiation from an accelerated charge. Special theory of relativity.

112. Thermodynamics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 115A or consent of instructor. Fundamentals of thermodynamics, including first, second, and third laws. Statistical mechanical point of view and its relation to thermodynamics. Some simple applications.

114. Mechanics of Wave Motion and Sound. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisites: courses 105A and 105B, or consent of instructor. Vibrating systems and wave propagation in gases, liquids, and solids, including elements of hydrodynamics and elasticity. Applications in ultrasonics, low-temperature physics, solid-state physics, architectural acoustics.

115A. Elementary Quantum Mechanics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: courses 8E, 105B (may be taken concurrently), 131. Classical background, basic ideas, formulation of quantum mechanics, one-dimensional problems, and methods of quantum mechanics.

115B. Elementary Quantum Mechanics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 115A. Three-dimensional problems, angular momentum, Pauli exclusion principle, variational and perturbative methods of quantum mechanics.

116. Electronics. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Alternating current circuits, transmission line circuits, transistor and IC circuits to generate, modify, and detect electrical signals, introduction to digital circuits, analysis of noise and methods to reduce its influence in electrical measurements.

117. Electronics for Physics Measurement. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Prerequisites: courses 8A, 8B, 8C, and 8D, or consent of instructor. Hands-on experimental course to develop understanding of design principles in modern electronics for physics measurements. Broad introduction to analog and digital elecronics from practical viewpoint, followed by examination of typical circuits for scientific instrumentation and study of methods of computer data acquisition and signal processing. P/NP or letter grading.

M122. Introduction to Plasma Electronics. (Same as Electrical Engineering M185.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 110A or Electrical Engineering 101. Senior-level introductory course on electrodynamics of ionized gases and applications to materials processing, generation of coherent radiation and particle beams, and renewable energy sources.

123. Atomic Structure. Prerequisite: course 115B. Theory of atomic structure. Interaction of radiation with matter.

124. Nuclear Physics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 115B. Nuclear properties, nuclear forces, nuclear structure, nuclear decays, and nuclear reactions.

126. Elementary Particle Physics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 115B. Introduction to physics of elementary particles. The four basic interactions: strong, electromagnetic, weak, and gravitational. Properties of baryons, mesons, quarks, and leptons; conservation laws, symmetries and broken symmetries; the Standard Model; experimental techniques; new physics at the new accelerators.

131. Mathematical Methods of Physics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Vectors and fields in space, linear transformations, matrices, and operators; Fourier series and integrals.

132. Mathematical Methods of Physics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 131. Functions of a complex variable, including Riemann surfaces, analytic functions, Cauchy theorem and formula, Taylor and Laurent series, calculus of residues, and Laplace transforms.

140. Introduction to Solid-State Physics. Prerequisite: course 115B or equivalent. Introduction to basic theoretical concepts of solid-state physics with applications. Crystal symmetry; cohesive energy; diffraction of electron, neutron, and electromagnetic waves in a lattice; reciprocal lattice; phonons and their interactions; free electron theory of metals; energy bands.

150. Physics of Charged-Particle and Laser Beams. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: courses 110A, 110B, 115A, 115B. Physics of charged-particle and laser beams presented as a unified subject. Basic physics of charged-particle beams, covering relativistic particle motion in electromagnetic fields, transverse focusing, acceleration mechanisms, linear and circular accelerators, and advanced topics. Some fundamentals of laser physics, including gain and broadening mechanisms, linear light optics, laser resonators, and advanced topics and applications. P/NP or letter grading.

160. Numerical Analysis Techniques and Particle Simulations. Lecture, three hours; computer terminals, six hours. Prerequisites: courses 105A, 105B, 110A, 110B, minimum knowledge of computer programming (FORTRAN). Introduction to the field of computer modeling of physical systems using particle models; numerical models and methods, methods of diagnosing results, experience with running interesting physical problems.

180A. Nuclear Physics Laboratory.

180B. Physical Optics and Spectroscopy Laboratory.

180C. Solid-State Laboratory.

180D. Acoustics Laboratory.

180E. Plasma Physics Laboratory.

180F. Elementary Particle Laboratory.

185. Foundations of Physics. Prerequisite: senior standing in physics or consent of instructor. Historical development and philosophical sources of classical and modern physics.

199. Special Studies in Physics (2 to 4 units). May be repeated, but no more than 12 units may be applied toward Physics B.S. degree requirements.

Graduate Courses

201Q. Modern Physics Research Areas (2 units). Review of modern physics research areas, with emphasis on those actively pursued at UCLA. S/U grading.

210A. Electromagnetic Theory. Boundary value problems in electrostatics and magnetostatics. Multipole expansions; dielectrics and macroscopic media. Maxwell equations and conservation laws. Wave guides and resonators; simple radiating systems.

210B. Electromagnetic Theory. Electromagnetic potentials and Hertz vectors. Cylindrical waves. Spherical waves. Debye potentials. Multipole radiation. Classical relativistic electrodynamics. Radiation from moving charges.

213A. Advanced Atomic Structure. Group representation theory. Angular momentum and coupling schemes. Interaction of radiation with matter.

213B. Advanced Atomic Structure. N-j symbols, continuous groups, fractional parentage coefficients, n electron systems.

213C. Molecular Structure. Application of group theory to vibrational and electronic states of molecules. Molecular orbital theory. Raman effect. Angular momentum and coupling in molecules.

214A. Advanced Acoustics. Propagation of waves in elastic and fluid media. Reflection, refraction, diffraction, and scattering of waves in fluids. Attenuation mechanisms in fluids.

214B. Advanced Acoustics. Propagation in nonhomogeneous fluids and in moving fluids. Radiation pressure, acoustic streaming, and attenuation in large amplitude sound fields. Propagation of sound in liquid helium. Mechanisms resulting in attenuation for elastic waves in solids.

215A. Statistical Physics. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics with applications.

215B. Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics. Probability theory, Markov processes, equations of change, BBGKY hierarchy and its consequences, Boltzmann equation, Chapman/Enskog method, transport coefficients, fluctuation/dissipation theorems, density matrix, H-theorems.

215C. Quantum Statistical Mechanics and the Many Body Problem. Classical methods for interacting systems; quantum field theory techniques in statistical mechanics; Green's function approach; Coulomb gas; imperfect Bose gas; electron/phonon interaction; superconductivity; phase transitions; theory of Fermi liquid.

220. Classical Mechanics. Lecture, three hours. Hamilton/Jacobi theory, action-angle variables, classical perturbation theory, and selected topics such as introduction to physics of continuous media and fluids, nonlinear phenomena.

221A-221B-221C. Quantum Mechanics. Lecture, three hours. 221A. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics, operators and state vectors, equations of motion. 221B. Prerequisite: course 221A. Rotations and other symmetry operations, perturbation theory. 221C. Formal theory of collision processes, quantum theory of radiation, introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics.

222A-222B-222C. Plasma Physics. Properties of a Coulomb gas with and without a magnetic field: equilibrium, oscillations, instabilities, fluctuations, collective phenomena, transport properties, and radiation. Description via single-particle orbit theory, magnetohydrodynamics, and kinetic equations of various types.

223. Advanced Classical Mechanics. Prerequisite: course 220. Topics such as nonlinear mechanics, ergodic theory, mechanics of continuous media.

224. Introduction to the Strong Interaction. Evidence concerning the strong interaction, particularly as exemplified in nucleon/nucleon and pion/nucleon systems. Isospin, scattering matrix, density matrix and polarization, properties of pions, one pion exchange potential, phase shift analysis.

225A-225B. Advanced Nuclear Physics. Prerequisites: courses 221A-221B. Normally preceded by course 224. Advanced course in structure of complex nuclei, nuclear models, scattering and reactions.

226A-226B-226C. Elementary Particle Physics (6 units each). Lecture, four hours. Prerequisites: courses 221A-221B-221C or equivalent and 230A-230B (may be taken concurrently). Modern theories of elementary particle physics beginning with symmetry principles and conserved quantities, classic V-A theory of weak interactions, gauge field theories (Abelian and non-Abelian), spontaneous symmetry breaking, SU(2) [yen] U(1) electroweak interactions of leptons, quarks, Ws, Z[infinity] and g, quark theory of hadrons and quantum chromodynamics.

226D. Beyond the Standard Model. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisites: courses 226A-226B-226C, 230A-230B-230C. Discussion of possible extensions of the current standard model of electroweak and strong interactions, including axions, technicolor, grand unified theories, supersymmetry, supergravity, and superstrings. S/U grading.

230A-230B-230C. Relativistic Quantum Theory (6 units each). Lecture, four hours. Prerequisites: courses 221A-221B-221C or equivalent or consent of instructor. Modern quantum field theory, including quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics, renormalization group methods, path-integral quantization, spontaneous symmetry breakdown, monopoles and other solitons.

231A. Methods of Mathematical Physics. Not open for credit to students with credit for Mathematics 266A. Linear operators, review of functions of a complex variable, integral transforms, partial differential equations.

231B. Methods of Mathematical Physics. Not open for credit to students with credit for Mathematics 266B. Ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, and integral equations. Calculus of variations.

231C. Methods of Mathematical Physics. Not open for credit to students with credit for Mathematics 266C. Perturbation theory. Singular integral equations. Numerical methods.

232A-232B. Relativity. Special and general theories, with applications to elementary particles and astrophysics.

232C. Special Topics in General Relativity.

233. Introduction to High-Energy Astrophysics. Introductory lectures on modern high-energy astrophysics. High-energy radiation processes. Neutron stars. Pulsars. X-ray sources. Black holes. Supermassive rotators and quasars.

235. Group Theory and Quantum Mechanics. Prerequisite: course 221A. Group representation theory and applications to quantum mechanics of atoms, molecules, and solids.

241A. Solid-State Physics. Prerequisites: courses 140, 215A, 221A. Symmetry, free electrons, electrons in a periodic potential, experimental measurement of band structure and Fermi surface parameters, cohesive energy, lattice vibrations, thermal properties.

241B. Solid-State Physics. Prerequisite: course 241A. Transport theory with applications, electron/electron interactions.

241C. Solid-State Physics. Prerequisite: course 241B. Semiconductors, magnetism, phase transitions, superconductivity.

242A-242B. Advanced Solid-State Theory. Prerequisites: courses 241A, 241B, and 241C (may be taken concurrently). Many body methods in solid-state physics.

243A-243K. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics. 243A. Disordered Systems; 243B. Magnetic Resonance; 243C. Phase Transitions; 243D. Magnetism; 243E. Superconductivity; 243F. Macromolecules; 243G. Semiconductors; 243H. Optical Interactions; 243I. Nonlinear Optics; 243J. Hopping Transport; 243K. Low-Temperature Physics.

250. Introduction to Acceleration of Charged Particles. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisites: courses 210A, 210B, 215A. Principles of charged-particle acceleration, including principles of synchrotrons and storage rings, beam parameter determination, statistical behavior of beams and beam cooling techniques, synchrotron light sources, colliding beam storage rings, medical accelerators, and free electron lasers.

260. Seminar: Problems in Plasma Physics.

261. Seminar: Special Problems in Theoretical Physics.

262. Seminar: Physics of the Solid State.

264. Seminar: Advanced Physical Acoustics.

266. Seminar: Propagation of Waves in Fluids.

268. Seminar: Spectroscopy.

269A. Seminar: Nuclear Physics (2 to 4 units).

269B. Seminar: Elementary Particle Physics (2 to 4 units).

269C. Seminar: Accelerator Physics (2 to 4 units). Physics principles governing design and performance analysis of particle accelerators, using existing accelerators as examples and emphasizing interplay among design goals, component performance, and operational experience. S/U grading.

280E. Advanced Plasma Laboratory. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Prerequisites: courses M122, 180E. Laboratory experiments on behavior of plasmas in magnetic fields. Study of basic physics of particle motions, distribution functions, and fluid dynamics. Plasma waves and nonlinear phenomena. Advanced probe, microwave and plasma diagnostics.

290. Research Tutorial: Plasma Physics (2 or 4 units). Three terms required of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion by staff and students directed toward problems of current research interest in plasma physics group, both experimental and theoretical. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

291. Research Tutorial: Elementary Particle The-ory (2 or 4 units). Prerequisites: courses 226A, 230A-230B. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion by staff, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

292. Research Tutorial: Spectroscopy, Low-Temperature, and Solid-State Physics (2 or 4 units). Required of each graduate student doing research in these fields, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion by staff and students on problems of current research interest in spectroscopy, low-temperature, and solid-state physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

293. Research Tutorial: Current Topics in Physics (2 units). Lecture, one hour. Seminar and discussion by staff and students on current topics in physics, both experimental and theoretical (topics not limited to one field of physics). Strongly recommended for graduate students in physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

294. Research Tutorial: Accelerator Physics (2 or 4 units). Lecture, one hour; discussion, two hours. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field. Seminar and discussion by faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students on topics of current interest in accelerator physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

295. Research Tutorial: Solid Earth Physics (2 or 4 units). Required (or course 292 if appropriate) of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily in second or third year. Seminar and discussion on solid earth physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

296. Research Topics in Physics (2 units). (Formerly numbered 296A-296Z.) Advanced study and analysis of current topics in physics. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

M297. Research Tutorial: Astroparticle Physics (2 or 4 units). (Same as Astronomy M297.) Lecture, one hour; discussion, two hours. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field. Seminar and discussion by faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students on topics of current interest in astroparticle physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

298. Research Tutorial: Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (2 or 4 units). Limited to six students. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion by staff and students on current problems in experimental elementary particle physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

299. Research Tutorial: Nuclear Physics (2 or 4 units). Required of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion on nuclear physics by staff and students, in both experiment and theory. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

370. Teaching Physics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of physics laboratory experiments and demonstrations available today for secondary school and community college physics courses. Part of Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program but open to other interested students.

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum (1 to 4 units). Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as a teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of a regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at the University. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

495. Teaching College Physics (2 units). Lecture/discussion (five or more one-hour meetings during term, plus intensive training week at beginning of Fall Quarter). Required of all new teaching assistants. Special course for teaching assistants designed to deal with problems and techniques of teaching college physics. Ideas and techniques learned are applied and evaluated in the sections of each teaching assistant. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

596. Directed Individual Studies (2 to 12 units). May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

597. Preparation for Master's Comprehensive Examination or Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U grading.

598. Master's Thesis Research and Writing. May be repeated twice for credit.

599. Ph.D. Research and Writing (8 or 12 units). May be repeated for a maximum of 18 units. S/U grading.


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