Previous Next Up Catalog Contents

Philosophy Courses

Lower Division Courses

1. Beginnings of Western Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Origins of Greek cosmology and philosophy, beginnings of systematic thought and scientific investigation concerning such questions as origin and nature of the material world, concept of laws of nature, possibility and extent of knowledge. Concentration on pre-Socratic philosophers, particularly Anaximander, Heraclitus, the Pythagoreans, Parmenides, Empedocles, and Greek atomists, during first two thirds of course and on Socrates and some earlier works of Plato in last few weeks.

2. Introduction to Philosophy of Religion. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introductory study of such topics as nature and grounds of religious belief, relation between religion and ethics, nature and existence of God, problem of evil, and what can be learned from religious experience.

4. Philosophical Analysis of Contemporary Moral Issues. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Critical study of principles and arguments advanced in discussion of current moral issues. Possible topics include revolutionary violence, rules of warfare, sexual morality, right of privacy, punishment, nuclear warfare and deterrence, abortion and mercy killing, experimentation with human subjects, rights of women.

5A. Philosophy in Literature. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Philosophical inquiry into such themes as freedom, responsibility, guilt, love, self-knowledge and self-deception, death, and meaning of life through examination of great literary works in the Western tradition.

6. Introduction to Political Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Study of some classical or contemporary works in political philosophy. Questions that may be discussed include What is justice? Why obey the law? Which form of government is best? How much personal freedom should be allowed in society? P/NP or letter grading.

7. Introduction to Philosophy of Mind. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introductory study of philosophical issues about nature of the mind and its relation to the body, including materialism, functionalism, behaviorism, determinism and free will, nature of psychological knowledge.

8. Introduction to Philosophy of Science. Study of selected problems concerning the character and reliability of scientific understanding, such as nature of scientific theory and explanation, reality of theoretical entities, inductive confirmation of hypotheses, and occurrence of scientific revolutions. Discussion at nontechnical level of episodes from history of science.

9. Principles of Critical Reasoning. Nature of arguments: how to analyze them and assess soundness of the reasoning they represent. Common fallacies that often occur in arguments discussed in light of what counts as a good deductive or inductive inference. Other topics include use of language in argumentation to arouse emotions as contrasted with conveying thoughts, logic of scientific experiments and hypothesis-testing in general, and some general ideas about probability and its application in making normative decisions (e.g., betting).

21. Skepticism and Rationality. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Can we know anything with certainty? How can we justify any of our beliefs? Introduction to study of these and related questions through works of some great philosophers of modern period, such as Descartes, Leibniz, Berkeley, or Hume.

22. Introduction to Ethical Theory. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended or required for many upper division courses in Group III. Systematic introduction to ethical theory, including discussion of egoism, utilitarianism, justice, responsibility, meaning of ethical terms, relativism, etc.

31. Logic, First Course. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended for students who plan to pursue more advanced studies in logic. Elements of symbolic logic, sentential and quantificational; forms of reasoning and structure of language.

32. Logic, Second Course. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 31 (preferably in preceding term). Symbolic logic: extension of systematic development of course 31. Quantifiers, identity, definite descriptions.

97. Freshman Seminar. Variable topics; consult Schedule of Classes or "Department Announcements" for topics to be offered in a specific term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

Upper Division Courses

100A. History of Greek Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Survey of origins of Greek metaphysics from pre-Socratics through Plato and Aristotle.

100B. Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Strongly recommended: course 100A. Survey of development and transformation of Greek metaphysics and epistemology within context of philosophical theology, and transition from medieval to early modern period. Special emphasis on Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, and Descartes.

100C. History of Modern Philosophy, 1650 to 1800. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course. Strongly recommended: course 100B. Courses 100A, 100B, and 100C should be taken in immediately successive terms if possible. Survey of development of metaphysics and theory of knowledge from 1650 to 1800, including Locke and/or Berkeley, Malebranche and/or Leibniz, and culminating in Hume and Kant. Topics may include views of these (and perhaps other) philosophers of the period on mind and body, causality, existence of God, skepticism, empiricism, limits of human knowledge, and philosophical foundations of modern science.

Group I: History of Philosophy

M101A. Plato -- Earlier Dialogues. (Formerly numbered 101A.) (Same as Classics M146A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Study of selected topics in early and middle dialogues of Plato.

M101B. Plato -- Later Dialogues. (Formerly numbered 101B.) (Same as Classics M146B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Prerequisite: course M101A. Study of selected topics in middle and later dialogues of Plato.

M102. Aristotle. (Formerly numbered 102.) (Same as Classics M147.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Study of selected works of Aristotle.

M103A. Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy. (Same as Classics M145A.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Study of some major Greek and Roman philosophical texts, including those of pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and Hellenistic philosophers, with emphasis on historical and cultural setting of the texts, their literary form, interrelations, and contribution to discussion of basic philosophical issues.

M103B. Later Ancient Greek Philosophy. (Same as Classics M145B.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Prerequisite: one course from 1, 100A, M101B, M102, or M103A, or consent of instructor. Study of some major texts in Greek philosophy of the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Readings vary and include works by Stoics, skeptics, philosophers of science, Neoplatonists, etc. P/NP or letter grading.

104. Topics in Islamic Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Development of Muslim philosophy in its great age (from Kindo to Averroes, 850 to 1200), considered in connection with Muslim theology and mysticism.

105. Medieval Philosophy from Augustine to Maimonides. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Development of early medieval philosophy within framework of Judeo-Christian theology and its assimilation and criticism of Greek philosophical heritage. Focus on problem of universals, existence and nature of God, problem of evil, and doctrines of the Trinity and atonement. Selected writings from Augustine through Maimonides read in English translation.

106. Later Medieval Philosophy. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Metaphysics, theory of knowledge, and theology of Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and Ockham, with less full discussion of other authors from the 13th through early 15th century. Selected texts read in English translation.

107. Topics in Medieval Philosophy. Prerequisite: one philosophy course. Recommended: course 105 or 106. Study of philosophy and theology of one medieval philosopher such as Augustine, Anselm, Abelard, Aquinas, Scotus, or Ockham, or study of a single area such as logic or theory of knowledge in several medieval philosophers. Topic announced each term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

C108. Hobbes. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Hobbes' political philosophy, especially the Leviathan, with attention to its relevance to contemporary political philosophy. May be concurrently scheduled with course C208.

C109. Descartes. Prerequisites: course 21 or two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Study of works of Descartes, with discussion of issues such as problem of skepticism, foundations of knowledge, existence of God, relation between mind and body, and connection between science and metaphysics. May be concurrently scheduled with course C209.

C110. Spinoza. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 21 or consent of instructor. Study of philosophy of Spinoza. May be concurrently scheduled with course C210, in which case there is weekly discussion meeting, plus fewer readings and shorter papers for undergraduates. Limited to 30 students when concurrently scheduled.

C111. Leibniz. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 21 or consent of instructor. Study of philosophy of Leibniz. May be concurrently scheduled with course C211, in which case there is weekly discussion meeting, plus fewer readings and shorter papers for undergraduates. Limited to 30 students when concurrently scheduled.

C112. Locke and Berkeley. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Study of philosophies of Locke and Berkeley, with emphasis in some cases on one or the other. Limited to 30 students when concurrently scheduled with course C212. P/NP or letter grading.

C114. Hume. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Selected topics from metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical writings of Hume. Limited to 40 students when concurrently scheduled with course C214.

115. Kant. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 21 or 22 or consent of instructor. Study of Kant's views on related topics in theory of knowledge, ethics, and politics. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

116. 19th-Century Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Selected topics in 19th-century thought.

117. Late 19th- and Early 20th-Century Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Selected topics in work of one or more of following philosophers: Bolzano, Frege, Husserl, Meinong, G. Moore, early Russell, and Wittgenstein. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

118. Kierkegaard. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Philosophical study of some major works of Kierkegaard, with emphasis on interpretation of the texts.

C119. Topics in Modern Philosophy. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Selected topics in one or more philosophies of the early modern period, or study in a single area such as theory of knowledge or metaphysics in several of the philosophies. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C219.

Group II: Logic, Semantics, and Philosophy of Science

124. Philosophy of Science: Historical. (Formerly numbered 126A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Historical introduction to philosophy of science. Several general topics discussed in context of actual episodes in development of natural sciences. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

125. Philosophy of Science: Contemporary. (Formerly numbered 126B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 31 or 124 or consent of instructor. Introduction to contemporary philosophy of science, focusing on problems of central importance. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

126. Philosophy of Science: Social Sciences. (Formerly numbered 126C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Discussion of topics in philosophy of social sciences (e.g., methods of social sciences in relation to physical sciences, value-bias in social inquiry, concept formation, theory construction, explanation and prediction, nature of social laws).

127A. Philosophy of Language. Prerequisite: course 31 or consent of instructor. Syntax, semantics, pragmatics. Semantical concept of truth, sense and denotation, synonymy and analyticity, modalities and tenses, indirect discourse, indexical terms, semantical paradoxes. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

127B. Philosophy of Language. Prerequisite: course 31or consent of instructor. Course 127A is not prerequisite to 127B. Selected topics similar to those considered in course 127A, but at more advanced and technical level. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

128A. Philosophy of Mathematics. Prerequisites: courses 31, 32, and preferably one additional logic course. Philosophy of mathematics; logicism of Frege and Russell, arithmetic reduced to logic; ramified type theory and impredicative definition (Russell, Poincaré, early Weyl).

128B. Philosophy of Mathematics. Prerequisite: course 128A or consent of instructor. Intuitionism of Brouwer, Heyting, and later Weyl; proof theory of Hilbert.

129. Philosophy of Psychology. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: one four-unit psychology course, one philosophy course. Selected philosophical issues arising from psychological theories. Relevance of computer simulation to accounts of thinking and meaning; relations between semantical theory and learning theory; psychological aspects of theory of syntax; behaviorism, functionalism, and alternatives; physiology and psychology.

130. Philosophy of Space and Time. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or one philosophy course and one physics course, or consent of instructor. Selected philosophical problems concerning nature of space and time. Philosophical implications of space-time theories, such as those of Newton and Einstein. Topics may include nature of geometry, conventionalism, absolutist versus relationist views of space and time, philosophical impact of relativity theory.

131. Science and Metaphysics. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Recommended: some background in basic calculus and physics. Intensive study of one or two metaphysical topics on which results of modern science have been thought to bear. Topics may include nature of causation, reality and direction of time, time-travel, backwards causation, realism, determinism, absolute view of space, etc. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

132. Philosophy of Biology. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Intensive study of one or two current topics in philosophy of biology, which may include structure of evolutionary theory, fitness, taxonomy, reductionism, concept of a biological species, and biological explanation. P/NP or letter grading.

133. Topics in Logic and Semantics. Prerequisite: course 32. Possible topics include formal theories, definitions, alternative theories of descriptions, many-valued logics, deviant logics.

M134. Introduction to Set Theory. (Same as Mathematics M112.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 32 or Mathematics 31B. Axiomatic set theory as framework for mathematical concepts; relations and functions, numbers, cardinality, axiom of choice, transfinite numbers. P/NP or letter grading.

135A. Metatheory of Sentential Logic. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 32 or equivalent. Introduction to metatheory of classical sentential logic. Emphasis on fundamental metalogical ideas, including proof by induction, rigorous definition of syntactic and semantic concepts, and proof of completeness. Discussion of philosophical significance of these ideas.

135B. Metatheory of Predicate Logic. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 135A or equivalent. Classical first-order logic, its scope, and limits. Gödel completeness theorem as main positive result. Some consideration to classical negative results on truth, decidability, and completeness, and relationship between first- and second-order logic.

136. Modal Logic. Prerequisite: course 135A. First course in two-term sequence (also see course 176). Topics include various normal modal systems, derivability within the systems, Kripke-style semantics and generalizations, Lemmon/Scott completeness, incompleteness in tense and modal logic, quantificational extensions.

Group III: Ethics and Value Theory

150. Society and Morals. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 22 or consent of instructor. Critical study of principles and arguments advanced in discussion of current moral and social issues. Topics similar to those in course 4, but familiarity with some basic philosophical concepts and methods presupposed. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

151A-151B-151C. History of Ethics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Course 151A is not prerequisite to 151B, which is not prerequisite to 151C. 151A. Selected Classics in Ancient Ethical Theories: Plato, Aristotle; 151B. Selected Classics in Modern Ethical Theories: Hume, Kant, Mill, Etc.; 151C. Selected Classics of Medieval Ethics.

153A. Topics in Ethical Theory: Normative Ethics. Prerequisite: course 22 or consent of instructor. Study of selected topics in normative ethical theory. Topics may include human rights, virtues and vices, principles of culpability and praiseworthiness (criteria of right action). May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

153B. Topics in Ethical Theory: Metaethics. Prerequisite: course 22 or consent of instructor. Study of selected problems in metaethics. Topics may include analysis of moral language, justification of moral beliefs, moral realism, skepticism, free will, moral motivation, etc. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

154. Topics in Value Theory: Rationality and Action. Prerequisite: course 6 or 7 or 22 or consent of instructor. Selected topics concerning normative issues in practical rationality or philosophy of action. Topics may include moral and practical dilemmas, nature of reasons for action, rationality of morality and prudence, weakness of will, freedom of the will, and decision theory. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

155. Medical Ethics. Examination of philosophical issues raised by problems of medical ethics, such as abortion, euthanasia, and medical experimentation.

156. Topics in Political Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Recommended: course 6 or 22. Analysis of some basic concepts in political theory. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

157A-157B. History of Political Philosophy. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. May be repeated with consent of instructor. 157A. Reading and discussion of classic works in earlier political theory, especially those by Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Rousseau. 157B. Reading and discussion of classic works in later political theory, especially those by Kant, Hegel, and Marx.

161. Topics in Aesthetic Theory. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Philosophical theories about nature and importance of art and art criticism, aesthetic experience, and aesthetic values. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

166. Philosophy of Law. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Examination, through study of recent philosophical writings, of such topics as nature of law, relationship of law and morals, legal reasoning, punishment, and obligation to obey the law.

Group IV: Metaphysics and Epistemology

170. Philosophy of Mind. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: two relevant philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Analysis of various problems concerning nature of mind and mental phenomena, such as relation between mind and body, and our knowledge of other minds. May be repeated once for credit with consent of instructor.

172. Philosophy of Language and Communication. Prerequisites: two relevant philosophy or linguistics courses or consent of instructor. Theories of meaning and communication; how words refer to things; limits of meaningfulness; analysis of speech acts; relation of everyday language to scientific discoveries.

M173. Metaphor and Literal Speech. (Same as Teaching English as a Second Language M189.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 or equivalent or consent of instructor. Use of interdisciplinary perspective to examine systematicity of form and function peculiar to human language that underlies dichotomy between (1) neutral or literal capacity of language and (2) metaphoric capacity. P/NP or letter grading.

175. Topics in Philosophy of Religion. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 21 or 22 or consent of instructor. Intensive investigation of one or two topics or works in philosophy of religion, such as attributes of God, arguments for or against existence of God, or relation between religion and ethics. Topics announced each term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

176. Metaphysics of Modality. Prerequisites: courses 31, 32. Highly recommended: course 136. Second course in two-term sequence (also see course 136). Metaphysical foundations of modal logic and philosophical basis of model theory of modal logic. What are "possible worlds"? What is the "accessibility" relation? Is modal logic a logic or a theory? Is its focus logical or metaphysical necessity? Are the two notions really distinct? How metaphysically involved is (quantified) modal logic? What is its connection to doctrines of (1) "Haecceitism" and (2) "Aristotelian Essentialism"? P/NP or letter grading.

177A. Existentialism. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Analysis of methods, problems, and views of some of the following: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Jaspers, Sartre, Marcel, and Camus. Possible topics include metaphysical foundations, nature of mind, freedom, problem of self, other people, ethics, existential psychoanalysis.

177B. Historical Studies in Existentialism. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Study of central philosophical texts of one of the following: Nietzsche, Heidegger, Jaspers, Buber, Sartre, or Camus. Emphasis on explication and interpretation of the texts. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

178. Phenomenology. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Introduction to phenomenological method of approaching philosophical problems via works of some of the following: Brentano, Husserl, Heidegger, Scheler, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Ricoeur. Topics include ontology, epistemology, and particularly philosophy of mind.

179. Oriental Philosophy: Buddhism. Examination of central concepts and arguments in Buddhist philosophy, with emphasis on school of Mahayana Buddhism. Appropriate parallels to social concepts in the Western tradition.

182. Elements of Metaphysics. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: course 21 or consent of instructor. Study of basic metaphysical questions; nature of physical world, of minds, and of universals; and answers provided by alternative systems (e.g., phenomenalism, materialism, dualism).

183. Theory of Knowledge. Prerequisite: course 21 or consent of instructor. Analysis of concept of empirical knowledge. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

184. Topics in Metaphysics. Prerequisite: course 21 or consent of instructor. Intensive investigation of one or two topics or works in metaphysics, such as personal identity, nature of dispositions, possibility and necessity, universals and particulars, causality. Topics announced each term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

186. Topics in Theory of Knowledge. Prerequisite: course 182 or 183 or consent of instructor. Intensive investigation of one or two selected topics or works in theory of knowledge, such as a priori knowledge, problem of induction, memory, knowledge as justified true belief. Topics announced each term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

187. Philosophy of Action. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Study of various concepts employed in understanding human action. Topics may include rational choice, desire, intention, weakness of will, and self-deception.

188. Philosophy of Perception. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Critical study of main philosophical theories of perception and arguments used to establish them.

189. Major Philosophers of the 20th Century. Prerequisites: two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Study of writings of one or more major modern philosophers (e.g., Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Carnap, Quine). May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

Special Studies

M192. Philosophical Analysis of Issues in Feminist Theory. (Same as Women's Studies M110D.) Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite for women's studies majors: Women's Studies 10; for other students: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Examination in depth of different theoretical positions on gender and women as they have been applied to study of philosophy. Emphasis on theoretical contributions made by the new scholarship on women in philosophy. Critical study of concepts and principles which arise in discussion of women's rights and liberation. Philosophical approach to feminist theories. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

193. Christian Ethical Thought. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Reading of selected classic and contemporary authors in the Christian ethical tradition, with philosophical analysis and assessment of their views on morality and religious life.

195. 19th- and 20th-Century Religious Thought. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Philosophical approach to Western religious thought of last 200 years, through study of selected works by such authors as Kant, Schleiermacher, Kierkegaard, Buber, Camus, and Tillich.

196. Undergraduate Seminar: Philosophy. Seminar, one hour; discussion, three hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Variable topics; consult Schedule of Classes or "Department Announcements" for topic to be offered in a specific term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

199. Special Studies (2 to 8 units). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Eight units may be applied toward degree requirements, but course cannot be substituted for a course in one of the four groups on basis of similarity of subject matter.

Graduate Courses

200A-200B-200C. Seminar for First-Year Graduate Students. Limited to and required of all first-year graduate students in philosophy. Selected topics in metaphysics and epistemology, history of philosophy, and ethics.

Group I. History of Philosophy

201. Plato. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of later dialogues.

202. Aristotle. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Analysis of major problems in Aristotle's philosophy based on reading, exposition, and critical discussion of relevant texts in English translation.

203. Seminar: History of Ancient Philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected problems and philosophers. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

206. Topics in Medieval Philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of philosophy and theology of one or several medieval philosophers such as Augustine, Anselm, Abelard, Aquinas, Scotus, or Ockham or study of a single area such as logic or theory of knowledge in several medieval philosophers. Topics announced each term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

207. Seminar: History of Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected problems and philosophers. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

C208. Hobbes. Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Hobbes' political philosophy, especially the Leviathan, with attention to its relevance to contemporary political philosophy. May be concurrently scheduled with course C108.

C209. Descartes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of works of Descartes, with discussion of issues such as problem of skepticism, foundations of knowledge, existence of God, relation between mind and body, and connection between science and metaphysics. May be concurrently scheduled with course C109.

C210. Spinoza. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics in philosophy of Spinoza. May be concurrently scheduled with course C110, in which case there is a two-hour biweekly discussion meeting, plus additional readings and longer term paper for graduate students.

C211. Leibniz. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics in philosophy of Leibniz. May be concurrently scheduled with course C111, in which case there is a two-hour biweekly discussion meeting, plus additional readings and longer term paper for graduate students.

C212. Locke and Berkeley. Prerequisite: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. Study of philosophies of Locke and Berkeley, with emphasis in some cases on one or the other. Limited to 30 students when concurrently scheduled with course C112. S/U or letter grading.

C214. Hume. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics in philosophy of Hume. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. May be concurrently scheduled with course C114.

215. Kant. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study of selected writings of Immanuel Kant.

216. 19th-Century Philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in 19th-century philosophy. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

C219. Topics in Modern Philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics in one or more philosophies of the early modern period, or study in a single area such as theory of knowledge or metaphysics in several of the philosophies. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C119.

220. Seminar: Topics in History of Philosophy. Seminar, three hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected problems and philosophers which may be from different periods. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

Group II. Logic, Semantics, and Philosophy of Science

221A. Topics in Set Theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics M112A or consent of instructor. Sets, relations, functions, partial and total orderings; well-orderings. Ordinal and cardinal arithmetic, finiteness and infinity, continuum hypothesis, inaccessible numbers. Formalization of set theory: Zermelo/Fraenkel; von Neumann/Gödel theory. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

221B. History of Set Theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Development of concept of set and axiomatic set theory by examining selected writings of Frege, Cantor, Russell, Zermelo, Gödel, and several others. Origins and significance of certain key ideas, such as set theory as logic, axiomatic set theory as a reaction to the paradoxes, formal first-order axiomatic set theory as opposed to informal axiomatics, type theory and rank hierarchy, ramification and predicativity, proper classes and sets as small classes, and particular Zermelo/Fraenkel axiomatic theory. Emphasis on actual expressed ideas and views of various influential authors.

222A-222B-222C. Gödel Theory. 222A. Prerequisites: several courses in logic, preferably including course 135B. First in series of three courses leading to Gödel incompleteness theorem and Tarski definition of truth. 222B. Prerequisite: course 222A. Second-order arithmetic. Second in series of three courses leading to Gödel incompleteness theorem and Tarski definition of truth. 222C. Prerequisite: course 222B. Gödel numbering and Gödel theory. Final course in Gödel theory series.

224. Philosophy of Physics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected philosophical topics related to physical theory, depending on interests and background of participants, including space and time; observation in quantum mechanics; foundations of statistical mechanics. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

225. Probability and Inductive Logic. Prerequisites: course M134, or Mathematics M112A and 112B, or consent of instructor. Topics may include interpretations of probability, Bayesian and non-Bayesian confirmation theory, paradoxes of confirmation, coherence, and conditioning.

226. Topics in Mathematical Logic. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Content varies from term to term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

227. Philosophy of Social Science. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Examination of philosophical problems concerning concepts and methods used in social sciences. Topics may include relation between social processes and individual psychology, logic of explanation in social sciences, determinism and spontaneity in history, interpretation of cultures radically different from one's own. Students with primary interest and advanced preparation in a social science are encouraged to enroll. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

230. Seminar: Logic. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

231. Seminar: Intensional Logic. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics may include logic of sense and denotation, modal logic, logic of demonstratives, epistemic logic, intensional logic of Principia Mathematica, possible worlds semantics. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

232. Philosophy of Science. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics in philosophy of science. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

233. Seminar: Philosophy of Physics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

Group III. Ethics and Value Theory

241. Topics in Political Philosophy. Prerequisites: course 150 or 156 or 157A or 157B or any two philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Examination of one or more topics in political philosophy (e.g., justice, democracy, human rights, political obligation, alienation). May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

245. Seminar: History of Ethics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

246. Seminar: Ethical Theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics. Content varies from term to term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

247. Seminar: Political Theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

248. Problems in Moral Philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Intensive study of some leading current problems in moral philosophy. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

255. Seminar: Aesthetic Theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

M256. Topics in Legal Philosophy. (Same as Law M217.) Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Examination of topics such as concept of law, nature of justice, problems of punishments, legal reasoning, and obligation to obey the law. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

M257. Seminar: Philosophy of Law. (Same as Law M524.) Seminar, three hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics in philosophy of law. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

Group IV. Metaphysics and Epistemology

271. Seminar: Topics in Metaphysics and Epistemology. Discussion, three hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

275. Human Action. Prerequisites: two upper division philosophy courses or consent of instructor. Examination of theories, concepts, and problems concerning human actions. Topics may include analysis of intentional actions; determinism and freedom; nature of explanations of intentional actions. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

280. 20th-Century Continental Philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Selected topics in 20th-century continental European philosophy. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

281. Seminar: Philosophy of Mind. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

282. Seminar: Metaphysics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

283. Seminar: Theory of Knowledge. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

284. Seminar: Philosophy of Perception. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

285. Philosophy of Psychoanalysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Examination of topics such as nature and validity of psychoanalytic explanations and interpretations, psychoanalysis and language, metapsychological concepts such as the unconscious, the ego, id, superego, defense mechanisms, and psychoanalytic conception of human nature.

286. Philosophy of Psychology. Relevance of computer simulation to accounts of thinking and meaning; relations between semantical theory and learning theory; psychological aspects of theory of syntax; behaviorism, functionalism, and alternatives; physiology and psychology.

287. Seminar: Philosophy of Language. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

288. Seminar: Wittgenstein. Seminar, three hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

289. Seminar: Philosophy of Religion. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

290. Workshop: Philosophy of Language. Seminar, two hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Ongoing discussion of current issues in philosophy of language based on contemporary texts and current research. Presentations of ideas by attending faculty and graduate students with open discussion. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.

299. Seminar: Philosophical Research. Seminar, three hours. Prerequisite: advancement to candidacy or consent of instructor. Presentation of ongoing research by graduate students or faculty members. Participants make presentations, analyze and discuss presentations of others, and read and discuss philosophical texts related to presentations. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U grading.

Special Studies

375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum (1 to 4 units). Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as a teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of a regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at the University. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

495. Teaching College Philosophy (2 to 4 units). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Seminars, workshops, and apprentice teaching. Selected topics, including evaluation scales, various teaching strategies and their effects, and other topics in college teaching. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

501. Cooperative Program (2 to 8 units). Prerequisite: consent of UCLA graduate adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

596. Directed Individual Studies (2 to 8 units). (Formerly numbered 596A-596B.) Properly qualified graduate students who wish to pursue a problem through reading or advanced study may do so if their proposed project is acceptable to a staff member. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

597. Directed Studies for Graduate Examinations (2 to 8 units). Preparation for M.A. comprehensive examination or Ph.D. oral qualifying examinations. S/U grading.

599. Research for Ph.D. Dissertation (2 to 8 units). Prerequisite: advancement to Ph.D. candidacy. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.


Previous Next Up Catalog Contents