• M5A. Elementary Nahuatl

    Units: 4

    (Same as Indigenous Languages of the Americas M5A and International and Area Studies M5A.) Lecture, five hours. Course M5A is enforced requisite to M5B, which is enforced requisite to M5C. Introduction to Aztec language of central Mexico. Coverage of basic Nahuatl grammar, with equal emphasis on reading, writing, conversation, and comprehension. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M5B. Elementary Nahuatl

    Units: 4

    (Same as Indigenous Languages of the Americas M5B and International and Area Studies M5B.) Lecture, five hours. Enforced requisite: course M5A. Introduction to Aztec language of central Mexico. Coverage of basic Nahuatl grammar, with equal emphasis on reading, writing, conversation, and comprehension. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M5C. Elementary Nahuatl

    Units: 4

    (Same as Indigenous Languages of the Americas M5C and International and Area Studies M5C.) Lecture, five hours. Enforced requisite: course M5B. Introduction to Aztec language of central Mexico. Coverage of basic Nahuatl grammar, with equal emphasis on reading, writing, conversation, and comprehension. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 10A. Introduction to Chicana/Chicano Studies: History and Culture

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Interdisciplinary survey of diverse historical experiences, cultural factors, and ethnic/racial paradigms, including indigenousness, gender, sexuality, language, and borders, that help shape Chicana/Chicano identities. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills. Letter grading.

  • 10B. Introduction to Chicana/Chicano Studies: Social Structure and Contemporary Conditions

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Multidisciplinary examination of representation, ideologies, and material conditions of Chicanas/Chicanos, including colonialism, race, labor, immigration, poverty, assimilation, and patriarchy. Emphasis on critical reading and writing skills. Letter grading.

  • M15A. Intermediate Nahuatl

    Units: 4

    (Same as Indigenous Languages of the Americas M15A and International and Area Studies M15A.) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses M5A, M5B, M5C. Course M15A is enforced requisite to M15B, which is enforced requisite to M15C. Taught primarily in Nahuatl. Examination of Nahuatl (Aztec) language of central Mexico at intermediate level. Coverage of Nahuatl grammar, with equal emphasis on reading, writing, conversation, and comprehension. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M15B. Intermediate Nahuatl

    Units: 4

    (Same as Indigenous Languages of the Americas M15B and International and Area Studies M15B.) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course M15A. Taught primarily in Nahuatl. Examination of Nahuatl (Aztec) language of central Mexico at intermediate level. Coverage of Nahuatl grammar, with equal emphasis on reading, writing, conversation, and comprehension. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M15C. Intermediate Nahuatl

    Units: 4

    (Same as Indigenous Languages of the Americas M15C and International and Area Studies M15C.) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course M15B. Taught primarily in Nahuatl. Examination of Nahuatl (Aztec) language of central Mexico at intermediate level. Coverage of Nahuatl grammar, with equal emphasis on reading, writing, conversation, and comprehension. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M18. Leadership and Student-Initiated Retention

    Units: 2

    (Same as African American Studies M18, American Indian Studies M18, and Asian American Studies M18.) Seminar, two hours. Limited to freshmen/sophomores/first-year transfer students. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M118. Exploration of issues in retention at UCLA through lens of student-initiated and student-run programs, efforts, activities, and services. Focus on populations with historically low graduation rates targeted by Campus Retention Committee. May not be applied toward departmental major or minor elective requirements. May be repeated once for credit. Letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 20. Central American Studies: Histories and Cultures

    Units: 5

    Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour. Survey of histories of Central Americans from time of independence movements of early 18th century to present. Major topics include local indigeneities, independence movements, 19th- and 20th-century dependency, state-nation and identity formation, politics of mestizaje, Indigenous resistance, imperialism and economic growth, relations with U.S., politics of development, and contemporary social movements. Letter grading.

  • 88. Sophomore Seminars: Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Limited to lower division students. Readings and discussions designed to introduce students to current research in Chicana/Chicano studies. Culminating project may be required. May not be applied toward departmental major or minor requirements. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 97. Variable Topics in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Requisite: course 10A or 10B. Current topics and particular research methods in Chicana and Chicano studies through readings and other assignments. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 98. Professional Schools Seminars

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours. Limited to 20 students. Introduction to issues of professional (nonacademic) settings and careers through readings and other assignments. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 100SL. Barrio Organization and Service Learning

    Units: 5

    Seminar, two hours; discussion, two hours; field placement, six hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Service learning placement in community-based organization, labor union, or service-oriented nonprofit organization. Study of role that these organizations play in improvement and change of Chicana/Chicano communities. Students meet on regular basis with instructors and provide periodic reports of their experience. Letter grading.

  • 101. Theoretical Concepts in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 10A or 10B. Survey of different theoretical approaches to field of Chicana and Chicano studies. Letter grading.

  • M102. Mexican Americans and Schools

    Units: 4

    (Same as Education M102.) Seminar, four hours. Theoretical and empirical overview of Chicana/Chicano educational issues in U.S., with special emphasis on disentangling effects of race, gender, class, and immigrant status on Chicana/Chicano educational attainment and achievement. Examination of how historical, social, political, and economic forces impact Chicana/Chicano educational experience. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M103C. Origins and Evolution of Chicano Theater

    Units: 5

    (Same as Theater M103C.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of development of Chicano theater from its beginning in legends and rituals of ancient Mexico to work of Luis Valdez (late 1960s). P/NP or letter grading.

  • M103D. Contemporary Chicano Theater: Beginning of Chicano Theater Movement

    Units: 5

    (Same as Theater M103D.) Lecture, three hours. Analysis and discussion of historical and political events from 1965 to 1980, as well as theatrical traditions that led to emergence of Chicano theater. Letter grading.

  • M103G. Contemporary Chicano Theater: Chicano Theater since 1980

    Units: 5

    (Same as Theater M103G.) Lecture, three hours. Analysis and discussion of Chicano theater since 1980, including discussion of Chicana playwrights, magic realism, Chicano comedy, and Chicano performance art. Letter grading.

  • 104. Comedy and Culture: Your Humorous Life

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. How to mine unique humorous life adventures from students' cultural identities and turn those distinct experiences into humorous literature. Students acquire skills to read their stories out loud, with emphasis on comedy in their pieces through art of storytelling and performance. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M105A. Early Chicana/Chicano Literature, 1400 to 1920

    Units: 5

    (Same as English M105A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Survey of Chicana/Chicano literature from poetry of Triple Alliance and Aztec Empire through end of Mexican Revolution (1920), including oral and written forms (poetry, corridos, testimonios, folklore, novels, short stories, and drama) by writers such as Nezahualcoyotl (Hungry Coyote), Cabaza de Vaca, Lorenzo de Zavala, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Eusebio Chacón, Daniel Venegas, and Lorena Villegas de Magón. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M105B. Chicana/Chicano Literature from Mexican Revolution to el Movimiento, 1920 to 1970s

    Units: 5

    (Same as English M105B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Chicana/Chicano literature from 1920s through Great Depression and World War II, ending with Chicana/Chicano civil rights movement. Oral and written narratives by writers including Conrado Espinoza, Jovita González, Cleofas Jaramillo, Angelico Chávez, Mario Suárez, Oscar Acosta, and Evangelina Vigil. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M105C. Chicana/Chicano Literature since el Movimiento, 1970s to Present

    Units: 5

    (Same as English M105C.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Survey of Chicana/Chicano literature since 1970s, with particular emphasis on how queer and feminist activism as well as Central and South American migration have shaped 21st-century chicanidad. Oral, written, and graphic fiction, poetry, and drama by writers including John Rechy, Gloria Anzaldúa, Los Bros Hernández, Ana Castillo, and Dagoberto Gilb guide exploration of queer and feminist studies, Reagan generation, immigration debates, and emerging Latina/Latino majority. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M105D. Introduction to Latina/Latino Literature

    Units: 5

    (Same as English M105D.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Survey of U.S. Latina/Latino literature and introduction to its major critical trends, with emphasis on groups of Caribbean, Mexican, South American, and Central American origin. Representative works read in relation to such topics as relationship between Latina/Latino populations and U.S. cultural sphere, struggle for self-determination, experiences of exile and migration, border zones, enclaves and language, and "mestizaje" and its impact on cultural production. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M105E. Studies in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino Literature

    Units: 5

    (Same as English M105E.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Variable topics course to give students broad introduction to issues and themes in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino literature. Topics include border, immigration, revolution, language, gender, sexuality, and diaspora, among others. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 105F. Gender, Fiction, and Social Change

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Study of essays, novels, short narratives, and plays written by Chicanas/Latinas. Required readings represent writers with focus on themes of identity, ethnicity, gender, and cross-border experiences leading to social change. Critical reading and analysis of works, searching for strengths and flaws, to point out unique contribution of each work to greater body of U.S. literature. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M105SL. Seminar: Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino Literature -- Service Learning

    Units: 5

    (Same as English M105SL.) Seminar, three or four hours; field placement, three or four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Specialized studies in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino literature. In-depth study of various topics related to Chicano/Latino communities in Southern California, including Chicana/Chicano visions of Los Angeles; immigration, migration, and exile; autobiography and historical change; Chicana/Chicano journalism; and labor and literature. Service learning component includes minimum of 20 hours of meaningful work with agency involved with Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino community and selected by instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM106. Health in Chicano/Latino Population

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Health M106.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of Chicano/Latino health status through life expectancy, causes of death, reportable diseases, services utilization, provider supply, and risk behaviors within demographic/immigration changes. Binational review of health effects in U.S. and Mexico. Concurrently scheduled with course C276. Letter grading.

  • M106B. Diversity in Aging: Roles of Gender and Ethnicity

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies M104C, Gerontology M104C, and Social Welfare M104C.) Lecture, four hours. Exploration of complexity of variables related to diversity of aging population and variability in aging process. Examination of gender and ethnicity within context of both physical and social aging, in multidisciplinary perspective utilizing faculty from variety of fields to address issues of diversity. Letter grading.

  • C107. Latina/Latino Families in U.S.

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Study of how intersections of race, class, and gender help shape experiences of Latina/Latino families in U.S. society and how these intersections also help shape individual experiences within families. Examination of family, race, class, and gender as sociological concepts. Readings about family experiences of diverse Latina/Latino groups in U.S., with special emphasis on immigrants, and analysis of how race, class, and gender together play important roles in shaping these experiences. Discussion of roles of structure and space for agency in each context. Concurrently scheduled with course C212. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M108A. Music of Latin America: Mexico, Central America, and Caribbean Isles

    Units: 5

    (Same as Ethnomusicology M108A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of traditional and contemporary musical culture. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 109. Chicana/Chicano Folklore

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Examination of roots of Chicana/Chicano folklore in Mexican oral tradition in mid-19th century and development of Chicana/Chicano folklore to present day. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM110. Chicana Feminism

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies CM132A.) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 10A or Gender Studies 10. Examination of theories and practices of women who identify as Chicana feminist. Analysis of writings of Chicanas who do not identify as feminist but whose practices attend to gender inequities faced by Chicanas both within Chicana/Chicano community and dominant society. Attention to Anglo-European and Third World women. Concurrently scheduled with course CM214. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 111. Chicana/Chicano and Latina/Latino Intellectual Traditions

    Units: 5

    Lecture, five hours. General view of philosophical, cultural, and social thought as well as intellectual traditions in Americas. Roles of writers as intellectuals and cultural/political strategists, and as definers of (national) identity, social reality, and struggles of liberation. Letter grading.

  • 113. Day of Dead Ritual

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Introduction to philosophical roots and evolution of traditional celebration of Day of Dead ritual. Contemplation of indigenous, Spanish, Mexican, Chicano, and other influences and manifestations of this ritual. Special attention to Nahuatl language and worldview related to this ancient ritual, such as ancient calendar systems. Designed to motivate critical thinking about what is observed in altars today and impact globalization has on tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M114. Chicanos in Film/Video

    Units: 5

    (Same as Film and Television M117.) Lectures/screenings, five hours; discussion, one hour. Goal is to gain nuanced understanding of Chicano cinema as political, socioeconomic, cultural, and aesthetic practice. Examination of representation of Mexican Americans and Chicanos in four Hollywood genres -- silent greaser films, social problem films, Westerns, and gang films -- that are major genres that account for films about or with Mexican Americans produced between 1908 and 1980. Examination of recent Chicano-produced films that subvert or signify on these Hollywood genres, including "Zoot Suit," "Ballad of Gregorio Cortez," and "Born in East L.A." Consideration of shorter, more experimental work that critiques Hollywood image of Chicanos. Guest speakers include both pioneer and up-and-coming filmmakers. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M115. Musical Aesthetics in Los Angeles

    Units: 4

    (Same as Ethnomusicology M115.) Lecture, three hours. Confronting aesthetics from classical perspective of art as intuition, examination on cross-cultural basis of diverse musical contexts within vast multicultural metropolis of Los Angeles, with focus on various musical networks and specific experiences of Chicano/Latino, African American, American Indian, Asian, rock culture, Western art music tradition, and commercial music industry. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M116. Chicano/Latino Music in U.S.

    Units: 5

    (Same as Ethnomusicology M116.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Historical and analytical examination of musical expression of Latino peoples who have inhabited present geographical boundaries of U.S. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 117. Chicana/Chicano Images in Mexican Film and Literature

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: adequate understanding of Spanish-language films without English subtitles. Throughout its rich history, spanning more than 100 years, Mexican cinema has produced great variety of films that deal with Chicana/Chicano experience. Like its U.S. counterpart, Mexican cinematic discourse portrayal of Chicanas/Chicanos has been plagued by use of stereotypes that limit visual representation of Chicanas/Chicanos. Exploration of causes and effects for such obtuse cinematic representation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M118. Student-Initiated Retention and Outreach Issues in Higher Education

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M118, American Indian Studies M118, and Asian American Studies M168.) Lecture, four hours. Exploration of issues in outreach and retention of students in higher education, especially through student-initiated programs, efforts, activities, and services, with focus on UCLA as case. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grading.

  • M119. Chicano/Latino Community Formation: Critical Perspectives and Oral Histories

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M123.) Lecture, four hours. Analysis of historical formation and development of Chicano/Latino communities in 20th century, with focus on labor, immigration, economic structures, electoral politics, and international dimensions. Letter grading.

  • 120. Immigration and Chicano Community

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Discussion on relationship between international immigration and development of Chicana/Chicano community. Examination of U.S. immigration policy and relationship between Mexican-origin population and other Latin American immigrants. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M121. Issues in Latina/Latino Poverty

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M121 and Urban Planning M140.) Lecture, four hours. Examination of nature and extent of urban and rural poverty confronting Latina/Latino population in U.S. Special emphasis on antipoverty policies of government and nonprofit organizations and social planning and economic development strategies. Attention also to literature on underclass. Letter grading.

  • M122. Planning Issues in Latina/Latino Communities

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M122 and Urban Planning M171.) Lecture, four hours. Exploration of socioeconomic, demographic, and political forces that shape low-income communities and analyses of planning intervention strategies. Emphasis on community and economic development and environmental equity. Letter grading.

  • 123. Applied Research Methods in Latino Communities

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Through combination of lectures, key readings, and several experiments, introduction to several applied research methods that are highly effective in producing sound and methodologically rigorous studies on poor and/or Latino communities, including important data that can be used for critical analysis and policy recommendations. Letter grading.

  • M124. Latino Immigration History and Politics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Honors Collegium M143.) Lecture, four hours. Overview of immigration in 20th century, examining social, political, and economic contexts out of which different waves of Latin American immigration to U.S. has occurred. Letter grading.

  • M125. U.S./Mexico Relations

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M125.) Lecture, four hours. Examination of complex dynamics in relationship between Mexico and U.S., using political economy approach to study of asymmetrical integration between advanced industrial economies and developing countries. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M126. Politics of Crisis: Migration, Identity, and Religion

    Units: 4

    (Same as Honors Collegium M145.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of individual and collective religious response of Latin Americans and Latinas/Latinos in U.S. to dislocations, displacements, and fragmentation produced by conquest, colonization, underdevelopment, globalization, and migration. Letter grading.

  • M127. Farmworker Movements, Social Justice, and United Farm Workers Legacy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M127.) Lecture, four hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Historical and social context of farmworker organizing, including its multiracial origins and its influence on fight for equality of working women. Specific focus on organizing of United Farm Workers and Farm Laborers Organizing Committee, and their relationship to AFL-CIO, other unions, and their influence on Chicano Movement. Letter grading.

  • M128. Race, Gender, and U.S. Labor

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M128.) Lecture, four hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to history and organization of labor movement in U.S. and North America. Discussion of race, class, and gender issues raised within movement, and various strategies for social change and economic equity pursued through organized labor and other means. Letter grading.

  • 129. Field Research Methods in Labor and Workplace Studies

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; field studies, two hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Discussion of roles of union and nonunion worker organizations in society and in improvement of quality of life for Latina/Latino communities. Review and application of field research methods to labor organizations and workplace sites, especially participant observation, interview techniques, and grounded theory and other methods of data analysis. Letter grading.

  • M130. Worker Center Movement: Next Wave Organizing for Justice for Immigrant Workers

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M167, Asian American Studies M166C, and Labor and Workplace Studies M167.) Seminar, three hours. Development of theoretical and practical understanding of worker center movement, with focus on historical factors that have led to emergence and growth of worker centers. Role of worker centers in promoting multiethnic and multiracial campaigns for workplace and economic justice. Transnational cross-border solidarity issues and rights of undocumented workers. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 131. Barrio Popular Culture

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Construction of model by which to organize study of Chicana/Chicano popular culture by focusing on barrio as metaphor for community. Examination of beliefs, myths, and values of Chicana/Chicano culture and representations in icons, heroes, legends, stereotypes, and popular art forms through literature, film, video, music, mass media, and oral history. Letter grading.

  • M132. Border Consciousness

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 132.) (Same as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M132.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Investigation through history, popular culture, and mass media of bilingual and bicultural identities produced by geographical and cultural space between Mexico and U.S. Special attention to border consciousness as site of conflict and resistance. Letter grading.

  • M133. Chicana Lesbian Literature

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered CM133.) (Same as Gender Studies M133 and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M133.) Lecture, four hours. Exploration of intersection of radical First and Third World feminist politics, lesbian sexuality and its relationship to Chicana identity, representation of lesbianism in Chicana literature, meaning of "familia" in Chicana lesbian lives, and impact of Chicana lesbian theory on Chicana/Chicano studies. Letter grading.

  • M135. Bilingual Writing Workshop

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered CM135.) (Same as Gender Studies M135C.) Seminar, four hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Writing sample required; access to course webpage mandatory; need not be bilingual to enroll. Technical instruction, analysis, and theoretical discussion of bilingual creative expression through genre of short fiction. Bilingualism as both politics and aesthetics to be central theme. Discussion and analysis of Chicana/Chicano and Latina/Latino short story collections. Peer critique of weekly writing assignments. Emphasis on narrative techniques such as characterization, plot, conflict, setting, point of view, and dialogue, and magical realism as prevailing Chicanesque/Latinesque style. Some attention to process of manuscript preparation, public reading, and publication. Letter grading.

  • M136. Censored! Art on Trial

    Units: 4

    (Same as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M136.) Lecture, four hours. Examination of censorship in visual arts, particularly art of queer Chicana/Chicano and Latina/Latino artists such as Alma Lopez, Ester Hernández, and Alex Donis. Other censored artists include feminist artist Yolanda López, queer artists Robert Mapplethorpe and David Wojnarowicz, painter Christ Ofili, photographers Sally Mann and Andres Serrano, printmaker Enrique Chagoya, muralist Noni Olabisi, writer Salman Rushdie, and four performance artists -- Karen Finley, Tim Miller, John Fleck, and Holly Hughes -- whose work was vetoed by chair of National Endowment for Arts (NEA) in 1990 after they had successfully passed through NEA?s peer review process and who came to be known as NEA Four. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 138A. Space, Place, and Race

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Investigation of theories of spatial formation and their import for study of race and ethnicity in the U.S. Theories of space and place from interdisciplinary list of readings to investigate ways racial formation is embedded in property, maps, streets, and borders. Themes include introduction to spatial theory, settler colonialism, critical cartography, boundaries, and transgression. How space has shaped racial formation in multiracial places. Investigation of ways space, place, and race operate in maps, built environment, and multimedia world. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 138B. Barrio Suburbanism

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Examination of barrio suburbanism, in which Chicanas/Chicanos and Latinas/Latinos impact working- and middle-class suburbs to reshape geography of metropolitan centers. Building upon urban studies of roles of public policy and planning in formation of el barrio, how suburban forms operate in multiracial and regional context. Points of intersection and conflict that illuminate how Chicana/Chicano and Latina/Latino populations have impacted economic, social, and political contours of suburbs in Los Angeles metropolitan region. Major themes include urban policy, planning history, mapping, immigration, relational racial formation, and pursuit of regional democracy. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M139. Topics in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino Literature

    Units: 5

    (Same as English M191B.) Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Variable specialized studies course in Chicana/Chicano and/or Latina/Latino literature. Topics may include labor and literature; Chicana/Chicano visions of Los Angeles; immigration, migration, and exile; autobiography and historical change; Chicana/Chicano journalism; literary New Mexico; specific literary genres. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M140A. Diasporic Nonfiction: Media Engagements with Memory and Displacement I

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M170A.) Seminar, three hours. Video production course, with emphasis on autobiographical, critical, and performance-based modes of nonfiction media making, drawing on practices of diasporic filmmakers who have grappled with suppressed collective memories of displacement, trauma, exile, and migration. What does it mean to make videos about memory in places where direct cues to remembering cannot be seen? Introduction to concepts from films and readings. Production assignments and screenings, with focus on questions of how to represent history, memory, family dynamics, and lived experience according to perspectives and interests of diasporic subjects. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course M140B).

  • M140B. Diasporic Nonfiction: Media Engagements with Memory and Displacement II

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M170B.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M140A. Students complete 20- to 30-minute video projects about issues or experiences central to everyday lives of collectives of diasporic peoples. They learn to propose, record, edit, and distribute one socially engaged nonfiction video and draw on their experiences from course M140A in writing voiceover, choreographing dances, designing public performances, interviewing, and recording everyday life. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C141. Chicana and Latin American Women's Narrative

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of Spanish (level 4). Analyses, comparisons, and discussion of narrative literary production of U.S. Chicana writers and their Latin American counterparts in English and Spanish, with particular focus on how each group deals with gender, ethnic, and class issues. Concurrently scheduled with course C251. Letter grading.

  • 142. Mesoamerican Literature

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of Spanish (level 4). Survey of premises of Mesoamerican literatures, including myths, lyrics, poetry, religious celebrations, rituals, and drama, specifically of Aztec and Mayan peoples prior to European contact. Letter grading.

  • 143. Mestizaje: History of Diverse Racial/Cultural Roots of Mexico

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Historical examination of diverse racial and cultural roots of Chicanas and Chicanos. Utilizing theoretical frameworks of "mestizaje," "Aztlán," "indigenismo," "La Raza Cósmica," and "la tercera raíz," examination of some important groups who have contributed to formation of Mexican national culture. Development of race relations in Mexico during colonial period, with focus on analysis of Nahuas (Aztecs), Mixtecs, Spaniards, and African slave population. Analysis of Asian immigration to Mexico and California during national period, specifically examination of migration and adaptation experiences of Chinese, Japanese, and Punjabi-Indian immigrants. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M144. Women's Movement in Latin America

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies M144 and Labor and Workplace Studies M144.) Lecture, four hours. Course on women's movements and feminism in Latin America and Caribbean to examine diverse social movements and locations from which women have launched political and gender struggles. Discussion of forms of feminism and women's consciousness that have emerged out of indigenous rights movements, environmental struggles, labor movements, Christian-based communities, peasant and rural organizing, and new social movements that are concerned with race, sexuality, feminism, and human rights. Through comparative study of women's movements in diversity of political systems as well as national and transnational arenas, students gain understanding of historical contexts and political conditions that give rise to women's resistance, as well as major debates in field of study. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M145A. Introduction to Chicano Literature: Literature to 1960

    Units: 4

    (Same as Spanish M145A.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: Spanish 25 or 27. Introduction to texts representative of Chicano literary heritage. Sampling of genres, as well as historical and geographical settings and points of view characteristic of work written by Chicanos during 20th century. Most required reading is in Spanish. Bilingual and English works are included and discussed. Reading and analysis of number of important scholarly and critical statements pertaining to characteristics and development of Chicano literary corpus. Letter grading.

  • M145B. Literature of Chicana/Chicano Movement

    Units: 4

    (Same as Spanish M155B.) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: Spanish 25 or 27. Examination of literature of Chicana/Chicano movement covering period from first manifestations of Chicano artistic production in 1965 with "el Teatro Campesino" through rise of women's writing, including work by Cherrie Moraga (1983), Helena Maria Viramontes (1985), and Sandra Cisneros (1991). P/NP or letter grading.

  • M146. Chicano Narrative

    Units: 4

    (Same as Spanish M155A.) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: Spanish 25 or 27. Introduction to major Chicano narrative genres -- novel, romance, satire, autobiography, "cronicón/semblanza," Chicana detective novel, and Chicana solidarity fiction. Texts examined within their own geographic, cultural, and historical contexts, as well as within history of narrative forms. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM147. Transnational Women's Organizing in Americas

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies M147C.) Lecture, four hours. Feminist theories of transnational organizing. Examination of gender and race as central to processes of globalization and essential to economic and political struggles encompassed in transnational power relations. Exploration of how questions of race and gender influence global economic policies and impact local actors and their communities. In time when people, capital, cultures, and technologies cross national borders with growing frequency, discussion of process of accelerated globalization has been linked to feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, questions of diaspora, sexuality, and cultural displacement, as well as growing global militarization. Problems and issues created by globalization and cultural, social, and political responses envisioned by transnational organizing. Concurrently scheduled with course C215. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M148. Politics of Struggle: Race, Solidarity, and Resistance

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 148.) (Same as African American Studies M148.) Lecture, four hours. Examination of Chicana/Chicano intergroup relations and political coalitions with other Latinos, African Americans, Asian and Pacific Islanders, and Euro-Americans, especially in communities undergoing rapid changes in demographic composition. Letter grading.

  • 149. Gendered Politics and Chicana/Latina Political Participation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Examination of Chicanas and Latinas as participants, organizers, and leaders in communities, workplaces, labor unions, and government. Survey of Chicanas/Latinas in politics and as policymakers in appointed and elected offices. Analysis of gendering of politics and political behavior. Letter grading.

  • 150. Affirmative Action: History and Politics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Historical examination of political economic context in which affirmative action policies and programs were conceived and implemented. Review of impact on Chicanas/Chicanos, Latinas/Latinos, and other communities. Specific analysis of university admissions, hiring and contracting practices, and state initiatives. Letter grading.

  • 151. Human Rights in Americas

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. International human rights law and U.S. foreign policy in context of historical, political, social, and legal issues and court decisions involving U.S. and its role and relations with governments and institutions throughout Americas. Historical and contemporary development of regional and international law, institutions, law, and norms related to promotion and protection of human rights. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 152. Disposable People: U.S. Deportation and Repatriation Campaigns

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Examination of U.S. deportation campaigns targeted at Mexican and other Latin American workers, residents, and U.S.-born citizens. Addressing various periods of large-scale highly organized deportation and repatriation efforts after violent conquest of Mexican territories in 19th century, during economic and social panic of Great Depression in 1930s and Operation Wetback in 1950s, and through turn of 21st century, examination of criminalization of Mexican and Latino immigrants, police and military tactics of federal government, and administrative and legal mechanisms and institutions that have been created to facilitate deportation. Provides grounded knowledge of U.S. deportation history to contextualize broader national debate about immigration reform that is occurring today. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 153. Central Americans in U.S.

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Interdisciplinary survey of social, historical, political, economic, educational, and cultural experiences of Central American immigrants and their children in U.S. Introduction to several contemporary experiences and issues in U.S. Central American communities. With focus mostly on Guatemalan, Honduran, and Salvadoran immigrants, exploration of social structures that constrain individuals, as well as strategies and behaviors immigrants and their communities have taken to establish their presence and incorporate into U.S. society. How Central American identity has been constructed and how this identity intersects with race, gender, and legal status. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 153B. Central American Racial Constructions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Interdisciplinary, transhistorical, and transnational exploration of indigenism, indigeneity, afro-indigeneity, blackness, mulataje, ladinization, and other racial-gendered constructions among peoples of and in Central America, and how these groups redefine their racial identification and disidentifications in and/or in relation to U.S. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 153C. Migrating U.S./Central American Cultural Production

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Exploration of culture making through memory, legends, counter-narratives, signs, symbols, foodways, and sounds as migratory processes that are transnational, transgenerational, translocal, and as part of U.S. Central American, Latina/o, and migrant experience within, across, and among cultural groups. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 153D. U.S. Central American Narratives

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Examination of textual narratives and genres that emerged or were actively deployed from Central America beginning with civil wars of late 1960s into late 1990s. Texts are read beyond confines of nation-state as narratives and subjectivities in exile. As part of stories of immigrants, these narratives contribute to making of U.S. Central American diasporas, and these communities making home in some other place than original or (re-)imagined homeland. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M154. Contemporary Issues among Chicanas

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies M132B.) Lecture, two and one-half hours. Requisite: Gender Studies 10. Overview of conditions facing Chicanas in U.S., including issues on family, immigration, reproduction, employment conditions. Comparative analysis with other Latinas. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M155A. Latinos in U.S.

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M155.) (Same as Sociology M155.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of history and social conditions of Latinos in Los Angeles as well as nationally, with particular emphasis on their location in larger social structure and on comparisons with other minority groups. Topics include migration, family, education, and work issues. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M155B. U.S. Latino Politics

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 155B.) (Same as Political Science M181B) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Examination of history and contemporary role of Latinos in U.S. political system. Topics include historical analysis of Latino immigration and migration; civil rights movement; increases in citizenship, registration, and voting in 1980s and 1990s; new wave of anti-immigrant attitudes; Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act and subsequent DREAMer movement; and response by Latinos today, with discussion of role of Latino vote in recent presidential elections. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M156A. Immigrant Rights, Labor, and Higher Education

    Units: 4

    (Same as Asian American Studies M166A and Labor and Workplace Studies M166A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. New immigrant rights movement, with particular attention to labor and higher education. Overview of history of immigrant rights movement and examination of development of coalition efforts between labor movement and immigrant rights movement nationally and locally. Special focus on issue of immigrant students in higher education, challenges facing undocumented immigrant students, and legislative and policy issues that have emerged. Students conduct oral histories, family histories, research on immigration and immigrant rights, write poetry and spoken word about immigrant experience, and work to collectively develop student publication on immigrant students in higher education. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M156B. Research on Immigration Rights, Labor, and Higher Education

    Units: 4

    (Same as Asian American Studies M166B and Labor and Workplace Studies M166B.) Seminar, two hours. Requisite: course M156A. Expansion of research conducted by students in course M156A involving oral histories, research on immigration/labor/higher education, and evaluation of legislation and legal issues impacting undocumented students. Letter grading.

  • M156C. Research on Immigrant Students and Higher Education

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M166C.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses M156A, M156B. Expansion of research conducted by students in courses M156A and M156B involving oral histories, research on immigration/labor/higher education, and evaluation of legislation and legal issues impacting undocumented students. Designed around class project, where students work on showcasing all material collected throughout year. Letter grading.

  • 157. Chicano Movement and Its Political Legacies

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Collective examination of Chicano Movement of 1960s and 1970s and analysis of its political legacies. Grounded in historiographic inquiry and social movement theory, investigation of mobilization of diverse sectors of "el movimiento," including students, workers, artists, youth, community activists, and women. Exploration of myriad issues and struggles that compelled Chicanas/Chicanos to resist such as land and labor rights, education, anti-war movements, community autonomy, police brutality, political inclusion, cultural recovery, racism, sexism, and class exploitation. Investigation of diverse ideologies, debates, and legacies of Chicano Movement through analysis of Chicana/Chicano motivations for organizing, modes, strategies, innovations, challenges, and articulation of new political subjectivities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M158. Chicana Historiography

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies M157 and History M151D.) Lecture, four hours. Examination of Chicana historiography, looking closely at how practice of writing of history has placed Chicanas into particular narratives. Using Chicana feminist approaches to study of history, revisiting of specific historical periods and moments such as Spanish Conquest, Mexican Period, American Conquest, Mexican Revolution, and Chicano Movement to excavate untold stories about women's participation in and contribution to making of Chicana and Chicano history. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M159A. History of Chicano Peoples

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M151A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey lecture course on historical development of Mexican (Chicano) community and people of Mexican descent (Indio-Mestizo-Mulato) north of Rio through 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, with special focus on labor and politics. Provides integrated understanding of change over time in Mexican community by inquiry into major formative historical forces affecting community. Social structure, economy, labor, culture, political organization, conflict, and international relations. Emphasis on social forces, class analysis, social, economic, and labor conflict, ideas, domination, and resistance. Developments related to historical events of significance occurring both in U.S. and Mexico. Lectures, special presentations, reading assignments, written examinations, library and field research, and submission of paper. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M159B. History of Chicano Peoples

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M151B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey lecture course on historical development of Mexican (Chicano) community and people of Mexican descent in U.S. through 20th century, with special focus on labor and politics. Provides integrated understanding of change over time in Mexican community by inquiry into major formative historical and policy issues affecting community. Within framework of domination and resistance, discussion deals with social structure, economy, labor, culture, political organization, conflict, and ideology. Developments related to historical events of significance occurring both in U.S. and Mexico. Lectures, special presentations, reading assignments, written examinations, library and/or field research, and submission of paper. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 160. Introduction to Chicana/Chicano Speech in American Society

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Survey course presenting (1) basic elements of Chicano language use, including history of Chicano languages, types and social functions of Chicano speech ("pachuco," "caló," Spanglish), sexist language, and multilingualism and monolingualism and (2) major social issues associated with language use by Chicanos and other urban ethnic populations. Letter grading.

  • 161. Chicana and Chicano Rhetoric

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Examination of speeches and other public discourse of Chicana/Chicano communities associated with political and social movements, using field of rhetoric (study of public speech and persuasion). Development of public speaking skills and abilities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 163. Bilingual Advantage: Spanish Language Topics on Chicana/Chicano and Latin American Cultures

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: Spanish 4. Review of Spanish language literature, newsprint, radio, and television in U.S., providing for student development of academic skills in Spanish. Comparison with Spanish language mass media in other parts of world. Letter grading.

  • 164SL. Oral History: Latino New Immigrant Youth

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered M164SL.) Seminar, three hours; tutoring, two and one half hours. Theory, methodology, and practice of oral history, together with background information on Latino immigration to U.S. Readings include oral histories of Latino immigrants. Letter grading.

  • 165. Latinas and Latinos in Public Education

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Examination of language issues pertinent to educational systems, including language inequity, literacy, testing, and socialization, as well as institutional ideologies. Letter grading.

  • 166. Paulo Freire for Chicana/Chicano Classroom

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Introduction to pedagogy of Paulo Freire and examination of historical and contemporary problems circumscribing Chicana/Chicano education. Central focus to offer Freirian alternative to answer theoretical, methodological, practical, and policy questions about schooling of Chicanas/Chicanos in U.S. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M167SL. Taking It to Street: Spanish in Community

    Units: 5

    (Same as Spanish M165SL.) Seminar, three hours; fieldwork, 10 hours. Enforced requisite: Spanish 25 or 27. Service learning course to give students opportunity to use cultural and linguistic knowledge acquired in Spanish classes in real-world settings. Students required to spend minimum of eight to 10 hours per week at agreed on site in Latino community. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 168A. Latinos: Print Media

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Examination of systemic (mis)representations of Latinos by print media source ("Los Angeles Times") by means of critical discourse analysis and metaphor theory. Investigation of empirical basis for theories of racism in language in this context. Student projects range from immigration to education and crime to culture. Letter grading.

  • 168B. Latinos: Television News

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 168A. Study of multimodal (visual, graphic, spoken, audio, and text) images disseminated by television news programs to learn how nation comes to their understanding of Latinos. Development of critical visual interpretive acuity through semiotics training and analysis of actual television news stories. Letter grading.

  • 169. Representations of Indigenous Peoples in Americas

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Strongly recommended requisite: course 101. Introduction to different forms of representation of indigenous peoples and their presence in Americas, with emphasis on Mesoamerica and Andes. How indigenous images are expressed, perceived, and constructed at point of contact with Europeans during development of indigenismo and in current period. Discussion of how these relate to Chicana/Chicano identity construction. Letter grading.

  • M170SL. Latinos, Linguistics, and Literacy

    Units: 5

    (Same as Spanish M172SL.) Seminar, four hours; field project, four to six hours. Recommended requisite: Spanish 100A. In-depth study of various topics related to literacy, including different definitions of literacy, programs for adult preliterates, literacy and gender, approaches to literacy (whole language, phonics, Freire's liberation pedagogy), history of writing systems, phoneme as basis for alphabetic writing, and national literacy campaigns. Required field project involving Spanish-speaking adults in adult literacy programs. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 171. Humor as Social Control

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Hegemonic humor directs laughter of more powerful people against those with less power. In this case laughter becomes weapon used against Latinos and immigrants. With rise of Latinos in last decade, there has been increase of various guises of anti-Latino hegemonic humor in commercial mass-mediated popular culture. Exploration of theorizing, as well as today's myriad examples, of such humor to develop critical literacy of social work it accomplishes. Letter grading.

  • 172. Chicana and Chicano Ethnography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Culture change theory encompasses such issues as innovation, syncretism, colonialism, modernization, urbanization, migration, and acculturation. Examination of methods anthropologists/ethnographers use in studying and analyzing culture change within ethnohistorical background of Mexican and Mexican American people to clarify social and cultural origins of modern habits and customs and, more importantly, unravel various culture change threads of that experience. Topics include technology and evolution, Indian nation-states, miscegenation, peasantry, expansionism, industrialization, immigration, ethnicity, and adaptation. Field project on some aspect of culture change required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M173. Nonviolence and Social Movements

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M173 and Labor and Workplace Studies M173.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Overview of nonviolence and its impact on social movements both historically and in its present context in contemporary society, featuring lectures, conversations, films, readings, and guest speakers. Exploration of some historic contributions of civil rights struggles and role of nonviolent action throughout recent U.S. history. Examination of particular lessons of nonviolent movements as they impact social change organizing in Los Angeles. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M174A. Restoring Civility: Understanding, Using, and Resolving Conflict

    Units: 4

    (Same as Education M145A.) Lecture, one hour; discussion, three hours. Course M174A is enforced requisite to M174B. Designed for students who want to learn principles of dialogue and mediation, as alternatives to violence, and practice how to apply them in educational settings. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course M174B).

  • M174B. Restoring Civility: Understanding, Using, and Resolving Conflict

    Units: 4

    (Same as Education M145B.) Lecture, one hour; discussion, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M174A. Designed for students who want to learn principles of dialogue and mediation, as alternatives to violence, and practice how to apply them in educational settings. Letter grading.

  • M174C. Alternatives to Violence: Peer Mediation in Public Schools

    Units: 4

    (Same as Education M145C.) Lecture, one hour; fieldwork, three hours. Requisites: courses M174A, M174B. Limited to juniors/seniors. Application of student knowledge and experience to help students in partner schools to develop peer mediation programs to be sustained by future UCLA students. Work at partner school sites and demonstration of firm grasp of concepts of conflict resolution through weekly reflective journals, discussion through biweekly meetings, and final journal entry. Application of critical thinking, review of literature from earlier courses, and reflection on student field experiences to deepen understanding of violence, its causes, and what schools can do to mitigate it. Letter grading.

  • M175. Chicana Art and Artists

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art M184 and World Arts and Cultures M128.) Lecture, four hours. Introduction to Chicana art and artists. Examination of Chicana aesthetic. Chicana artists have developed unique experience and identity as artists and Chicanas. Letter grading.

  • 176. Globalization and Transnationalism: Local Historical Dynamics and Praxis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Analysis of dynamics of Chicana/Chicano transnational community formation in comparative global perspective, explored both as historical result of and key future actor in localized dynamics of transnationalization in California's relation to world. Analysis of Chicana/Chicano experience in California as both highly linked node and localized microcosm of dynamics of globalization that is both affected by as well as influences course of alternative scenarios of globalization. Designed to help students develop critical political economy analysis of interplay between globalization and localized transnational dynamics that together are giving meaning to and constructing new social identities and strategies for struggle throughout world. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C177. Latino Social Policy

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 177.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of social welfare of Latinos (Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans) in U.S. through assessment and critical analysis of social policy issues affecting them. Survey of social, economic, cultural, and political circumstances affecting ability of Latinos to access public benefits and human services. Concurrently scheduled with course C277. Letter grading.

  • 178. Latinas/Latinos and Law: Comparative and Historical Perspectives

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Survey of experiences of Latinas/Latinos with U.S. legal system. Examination of landmark appellate decisions and litigation efforts in jury service, voting rights, language, public accommodations, education, and other areas. Critical assessment of role of legal principles and litigation in improving Latina/Latino position within U.S. society. Letter grading.

  • C179. Language Politics and Policies in U.S.: Comparative History

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered CM179.) Lecture, four hours. Historical overview of national and institutional language policies, especially schooling, in U.S. as context to understanding social, legal, and political constraints on bilingualism. Definitions and development of language policy and planning, history of general and educational language policies in U.S., demographic profile of language diversity, and current language and educational policy issues in U.S. Comparisons with selected international cases. Concurrently scheduled with course C274. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180. Chicana and Chicano Schooling and Community Activism

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Overview of Chicana/Chicano schooling issues in U.S., with special emphasis on several important historical events that exemplify struggle for educational justice and equity that affected Chicana/Chicano education -- Mendez versus Westminster (1947) desegregation case and 1968 high school Chicana/Chicano student walkouts. Through oral history projects, documentation of legacy of Sylvia Mendez, who experienced segregation in one Mexican school in 1940s, Sal Castro, Chicano teacher and central figure in1968 walkouts, and Chicano Youth Leadership Conference (CYLC). Examination of how historical, social, and political forces have impacted Chicana/Chicano educational experiences. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 181. History of Chicana/Chicano Los Angeles, 20th Century

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. History of Mexican American people in 20th-century Los Angeles. Readings and lectures emphasize formation of regional identity among Mexican Americans in Los Angeles and their significance to emergence of multicultural metropolis. Letter grading.

  • CM182. Understanding Whiteness in American History and Culture

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M151C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. History, construction, and representation of whiteness in American society. Readings and discussions trace evolution of white identity and explore its significance to historical construction of race class in American history. Concurrently scheduled with course C256. Letter grading.

  • M183. History of Los Angeles

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M155.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Social, economic, cultural, and political development of Los Angeles and its environs from time of its founding to present. Emphasis on diverse peoples of area, changing physical environment, various interpretations of city, and Los Angeles' place among American urban centers. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 184. History of U.S./Mexican Borderlands

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Survey of historic and geographic diversity of Chicana/Chicano identity and culture, with emphasis on regional communities of California, New Mexico, and Texas in Spanish/Mexican borderlands as situated within U.S. national context. Letter grading.

  • M185. Whose Monument Where: Course on Public Art

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art M185 and World Arts and Cultures M126.) Lecture, four hours. Recommended corequisite: course M186A, M186B, or M186C. Examination of public monuments in U.S. as basis for cultural insight and critique of American values from perspective of artist. Use of urban Los Angeles as textbook in urban space issues such as who is public, what is public space at end of 20th century, what defines neighborhoods, and do different ethnic populations use public space differently. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M186A. Beyond Mexican Mural: Beginning Muralism and Community Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art M186A and World Arts and Cultures M125A.) Studio/lecture, four hours. Corequisite: course M186AL. Investigation of muralism as method of community education, development, and empowerment. Exploration of issues through development of large-scale collaborative digitally created image and/or painting for placement in community. Students research, design, and work with community participants. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M186AL. Beyond Mexican Mural: Beginning Muralism and Community Laboratory

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art M186AL and World Arts and Cultures M125AL.) Laboratory, four hours. Corequisite: course M186A. Course M186AL is requisite to M186BL, which is requisite to M186CL. Mural and Digital Laboratory is art studio housed at Social and Public Art Resource Center in Venice, CA, where students work in community-based setting. Open to students during scheduled hours with laboratory tech support, it offers instruction as students independently and in collaborative teams research, design, and produce large-scale painted and digitally generated murals to be placed in community setting. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M186B. Beyond Mexican Mural: Intermediate Muralism and Community Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art M186B and World Arts and Cultures M125B.) Studio/lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses M186A, M186AL. Corequisite: course M186BL. Continuation of investigation of muralism as method of community education, development, and empowerment. Exploration of issues through development of large-scale collaborative digitally created image and/or painting for placement in community. Students research, design, and work with community participants. Continuation of project through states of production to full scale and community approval. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M186BL. Beyond Mexican Mural: Intermediate Muralism and Community Laboratory

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art M186BL and World Arts and Cultures M125BL.) Laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses M186A, M186AL. Corequisite: course M186B. Mural and Digital Laboratory is art studio housed at Social and Public Art Resource Center in Venice, CA, where students work in community-based setting. Open to students during scheduled hours with laboratory tech support, it offers instruction as students independently and in collaborative teams research, design, and produce large-scale painted and digitally generated murals to be placed in community setting. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M186C. Beyond Mexican Mural: Advanced Muralism and Community Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art M186C and World Arts and Cultures M125C.) Studio/lecture, six hours. Requisites: courses M186B, M186BL. Corequisite: course M186CL. Continuation of investigation of muralism as method of community education, development, and empowerment. Exploration of issues through development of large-scale collaborative digitally created image and/or painting for placement in community. Students research, design, and work with community participants. Continuation of project through installation, documentation, and dedication, with work on more advanced independent projects. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M186CL. Beyond Mexican Mural: Advanced Muralism and Community Laboratory

    Units: 2

    (Same as Art M186CL and World Arts and Cultures M125CL.) Laboratory, two hours. Requisite: course M186BL. Mural and Digital Laboratory is art studio housed at Social and Public Art Resource Center in Venice, CA, where students work in community-based setting. Open to students during scheduled hours with laboratory tech support, it offers instruction as students independently and in collaborative teams research, design, and produce large-scale painted and digitally generated murals to be placed in community setting. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M187. Latino Metropolis: Architecture and Urbanism in Americas

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M151E and Urban Planning M187.) Lecture, four hours. Introduction to history of architecture and urbanism in Americas, from fabled cities of Aztec empire to barrios of 21st-century Los Angeles and Miami. Emphasis on role of cities in Latina/Latino experience and uses of architecture and city planning to forge new social identities rooted in historical experiences of conquest, immigration, nationalization, and revolution. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188. Special Courses in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Some sections may require prior coursework. Departmentally sponsored experimental or temporary courses, such as those taught by visiting faculty members. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 190. Research Colloquia in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Designed to bring together students undertaking supervised tutorial research in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to present reports, discuss research methodologies, share findings, and provide feedback on each other's work. Culminates in public summit of Chicana/Chicano student research at which students expected to present polished position papers on their research. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • 191. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Research seminar organized around readings and engaged discussion of critical topic of interest in field. Exploration of issue, its theoretical implication for field, and practical implications for communities. Final research project required. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 192A. Undergraduate Practicum in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Training and supervised practicum for advanced undergraduate students who assist in preparation of materials and/or development of innovative programs or courses of study under guidance of faculty members in small group settings or one-on-one setting. May not be applied toward departmental major or minor elective requirements. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 193. Readings/Speaker Series Seminars: Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Limited to undergraduate Colloquia Series students. Reading of journal articles associated with speaker topics to enliven postcolloquia discussions. May not be applied toward departmental major or minor elective requirements. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • 194. Research Group Seminars: Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 2

    Seminar, one hour. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Discussion of current literature in field or of research of faculty members or students. Use of specific research method on selected topic. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP grading.

  • 195. Community Internships in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, two hours; field placement, eight hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship in supervised setting in community agency or business. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports of their experience. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M195CE. Comparative Approaches to Community and Corporate Internships

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M195CE, American Indian Studies M195CE, Asian American Studies M195CE, and Gender Studies M195CE.) Tutorial, one hour; fieldwork, eight to 10 hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship in corporate, governmental, or nonprofit setting coordinated through Center for Community Learning. Comparative study of race, gender, and indigeneity in relation to contemporary workplace dynamics. Students complete weekly written assignments, attend biweekly meetings with graduate student coordinator, and write final research paper. Faculty sponsor and graduate student coordinator construct series of reading assignments that examine issues related to internship site. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 196. Research Apprenticeship in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Requisite: course 10A or 10B. Limited to juniors/seniors. Entry-level research apprenticeship for upper division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Participation in all aspects of research project, including library research, reading materials, and compilation of data, with scheduled meetings throughout term with faculty mentor for discussion of project. May not be applied toward departmental major or minor requirements. May be repeated under different contract; consult department. Individual contract required. P/NP grading.

  • 197. Individual Studies in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, four hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 197C. Individual Capstone Studies

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, one hour. Requisites: courses 10A and 10B, or 101. Limited to departmental junior/senior majors. Guided study led by faculty supervisor. Instructor meets with student to help design culminating capstone project so it conforms to departmental capstone project guidelines. Must be taken in conjunction with one upper division departmental course. May not be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 198A. Honors Research in Chicana and Chicano Studies: Thesis Conceptualization

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, one hour. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 101, and 89 or 189. Limited to junior/senior honors program students. Conceptualization and formulation of project in Fall Quarter under direct supervision of faculty member. Preliminary data collection on topic and production of proposal for thesis required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 198B. Honors Research in Chicana and Chicano Studies: Annotated Bibliography/Literature Review

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 198A. Limited to junior/senior honors program students. Development of research skills in Winter Quarter to produce extensive annotated bibliography or literature review on thesis topic. Weekly meetings with faculty member to discuss research and develop outline, argument, and structure of thesis. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 198C. Honors Research in Chicana and Chicano Studies: Writing and Revision

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, one hour. Requisite: course 198B. Limited to junior/senior honors program students. Writing, revision, and completion of departmental honors thesis in Spring Quarter to specification and satisfaction of thesis committee. Public presentation and defense of thesis required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, two hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 200. Theoretical Paradigms in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 201.) Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Examination of several approaches and important theoretical frameworks in field of Chicana and Chicano studies. Exploration of changes that have taken place around four key theoretical areas -- coloniality, nationhood, inequality studies, and genders and sexualities. S/U or letter grading.

  • 201. Activist Scholarship and Intersectional Methodologies Seminar

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Exploration of four critical epistemologies, or schools of thought, that employ intersectional methodologies as basis for social action research -- Chicana/Chicano cultural studies, Chicana feminism, queer studies, and critical legal studies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 202. Qualitative Methods in Study of Chicanas/Chicanos and Latinas/Latinos

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Methods course that takes students through entire empirical research cycle. Students required to collectively develop interesting research questions, conduct qualitative research, analyze original data, and write final papers that contextualize findings within existing social scientific literature. To answer research questions, students select from theoretical frameworks discussed in readings. S/U or letter grading.

  • 208. Research Design and Methods in Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Research design and methods in Xican@ studies, including critical historical review of prior research designs and methods leading to need for Chican@ studies. Survey of research designs, data collection methods, data analysis methods, and reporting in quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research in Chicana/Chicano studies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209. Service Learning: Theory and Praxis

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Examination of approaches and theories that underpin service learning and exploration of ways in which service learning can be utilized in variety of academic disciplines (second and foreign language instruction, education, ethnic studies, labor studies, women's studies, public health, literature, public art, political science, etc.). Creation of research proposal for use of service learning in one course (real or hypothetical) in academic discipline of student's choice. S/U or letter grading.

  • 210. Queer of Color Genealogies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Art of community-making by those multiply marginalized by categories of race, gender, class, citizenship, and gender nonconformity and disposed of normative forms of belonging. Tracking of genealogies of queer of color communities through alternative archives of desire, love, affect, memory, performance, and politics. Reading about queer of color theories and practices, with special focus on oral history, digital storytelling, and forms of social documentation methodologies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 211. Immobilizing Immigrants: Detention and Deportation in U.S.

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. History of detention and deportation policy in U.S. as it affects Mexicans and other Latinas/Latinos. Consolidation of this legal authority and its deployment across 20th century. S/U or letter grading.

  • C212. Latina/Latino Families in U.S.

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Study of how intersections of race, class, and gender help shape experiences of Latina/Latino families in U.S. society and how these intersections also help shape individual experiences within families. Examination of family, race, class, and gender as sociological concepts. Readings about family experiences of diverse Latina/Latino groups in U.S., with special emphasis on immigrants, and analysis of how race, class, and gender together play important roles in shaping these experiences. Discussion of roles of structure and space for agency in each context. Concurrently scheduled with course C107. Letter grading.

  • M213. Asian-Latinos

    Units: 4

    (Same as Asian American Studies M213.) Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Examination of historical and contemporary populations of Asian-Latinos in Latin America and U.S. Review and critique of nascent literature on Asian-Latinos and analysis of experience of Asian-Latinos utilizing theoretical frameworks of "mestizaje," critical mixed-race theory, and transnationalism. Coverage of often-overlooked Asian contributions to Latin American and Chicano/Latino culture and identity and exploration of unique experience of mixed-race Asian-Latinos. S/U or letter grading.

  • CM214. Chicana Feminism

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies CM232A.) Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 10A or Gender Studies 10. Examination of theories and practices of women who identify as Chicana feminist. Analysis of writings of Chicanas who do not identify as feminist but whose practices attend to gender inequities faced by Chicanas both within Chicana/Chicano community and dominant society. Attention to Anglo-European and Third World women. Concurrently scheduled with course CM110. S/U or letter grading.

  • C215. Transnational Women's Organizing in Americas

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Feminist theories of transnational organizing. Examination of gender and race as central to processes of globalization and essential to economic and political struggles encompassed in transnational power relations. Exploration of how questions of race and gender influence global economic policies and impact local actors and their communities. In time when people, capital, cultures, and technologies cross national borders with growing frequency, discussion of process of accelerated globalization has been linked to feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, questions of diaspora, sexuality, and cultural displacement, as well as growing global militarization. Problems and issues created by globalization and cultural, social, and political responses envisioned by transnational organizing. Concurrently scheduled with course CM147. Letter grading.

  • 232. Aesthetics of Place in Chicana/Chicano Expressive Culture

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Examination of several place-based aesthetic traditions, including indigenous, Santería, diasporic, and Aztlán aesthetics, in Chicana/Chicano visual art, film, performance, and literature. Special focus on place as site of identity, history/memory, and creative production. S/U or letter grading.

  • 233. Community Cultural Development in Public Art: From Neighborhood to Global

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Designed for graduate students. Artist approaches to transformations of local and global communities through aesthetic practices in visual arts, spoken word, visual performance, music, and dance that include participatory audience inclusion and foster civic dialogue and community advocacy and activism. Issues of cultural democracy based in cultural retention and affirmation. Case studies of artist projects in community cultural development provide contemporary examples of evolving field of work and basis for critical analysis. S/U or letter grading.

  • 234. New Social Media and Activist Art

    Units: 4

    Studio, four hours. Limited to graduate students. Hands-on learning and production experience as essential to full understanding of modern media. Promotion of pragmatic style of humanistic and social scientific scholarship that prepares students to think critically and productively about media form, content, and context while learning to effectively use social media. S/U or letter grading.

  • M247. Chicano Literature

    Units: 4

    (Same as Spanish M247.) Lecture, three hours. Study of major movements and authors of Mexican American literature. S/U or letter grading.

  • C251. Chicana and Latin American Women's Narrative

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of Spanish (level 4). Analyses, comparisons, and discussion of narrative literary production of U.S. Chicana writers and their Latin American counterparts in English and Spanish, with particular focus on how each group deals with gender, ethnic, and class issues. Concurrently scheduled with course C141. Letter grading.

  • 252. Cultural Representations in Americas

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Analysis of Latina/Latino and Latin American fictional and nonfictional narratives and films, with emphasis on gender issues, diasporas, and global transformation. Use of aesthetic and formal analytical perspectives and several conceptual frameworks -- cultural studies, postcolonial studies, neoliberalism, intersectionality, and feminist theories. Study of these cultural productions as expression of intersectionalities and differences among Latina/Latino and Latin American cultural workers, as well as among diverse populations and changing experiences their works refer to. S/U or letter grading.

  • 253. Tenth Muses of Chicana Theory

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Chicana lesbian feminist theory in its multiple and historical manifestations, beginning in 17th century with early proto-feminist work of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Mexican nun/scholar/poet known world over as first feminist of Americas. Exploration of Sor Juana's feminist legacy in 20th-century Chicana lesbian and Chicana feminist theorists and scholars, such as Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherrie Moraga, Emma Pérez, Chela Sandoval, Norma Alarcón, and Alicia Arrizón. Discussion of foundational theoretical concepts such as Anzaldúa's foundational concepts of "mundo zurdo," "nepantla," "mestiza" consciousness, and "conocimiento"; Pérez's "sitio y lengua" and decolonial imaginary; Sandoval's methodology of oppressed, differential consciousness, and hermeneutics of love; and Arrizón's postcolonial queer "mestizaje." How to apply several of these theories in decolonization of one revered cultural icon, "la Virgen de Guadalupe." S/U or letter grading.

  • 254. Los Angeles: History, Space, and Culture

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Exploration of significance of Los Angeles as birthplace of Chicana/Chicano identity and historical development of Mexican American culture and community in Southern California. Historiography of Latino Los Angeles from Spanish conquest to present, with emphasis on labor, immigration, art culture, and politics. Survey of current literature on socioeconomic condition of Mexican Americans in Los Angeles and burgeoning culture and politics of Latino Los Angeles at outset of 21st century. S/U or letter grading.

  • 255. Mass Media Research Methods

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Survey of range of qualitative and quantitative communication methods and findings regarding Chicana/Chicano and Latina/Latino topics for all media types in both English and Spanish. Critical evaluation of research findings across this expansive field and design of complex research problems. S/U or letter grading.

  • C256. Understanding Whiteness in American History and Culture

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for graduate students. History, construction, and representation of whiteness in American society. Readings and discussions trace evolution of white identity and explore its significance to historical construction of race class in American history. Concurrently scheduled with course CM182. Letter grading.

  • 258. Laughter, Political Humor, and Social Control

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Investigation of power of political humor, one social practice that constructs discriminatory hierarchies in interpersonal settings and mass media. With goal of developing set of principled methods to investigate its manifestations, reading of outstanding humanistic contributions across history of its social function and power, development of classification of types and settings of political humor, and critical evaluation of recent social scientific models of its nature. S/U or letter grading.

  • 259. Critical Discourse Analytic Methods

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to departmental graduate students. Two critical discourse analytic (CDA) methods taught to document language of public figures. Student teams employ one method (conceptual metaphor CDA or discourse historical approach) to analyze actual public official's own discourse surrounding one controversial issue. Empirical study of discourses that are based on independently developed research enterprises can be valuable tool for variety of graduate student research. S/U or letter grading.

  • C274. Language Politics and Policies in U.S.: Comparative History

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Historical overview of national and institutional language policies, especially schooling, in U.S. as context to understanding social, legal, and political constraints on bilingualism. Definitions and development of language policy and planning, history of general and educational language policies in U.S., demographic profile of language diversity, and current language and educational policy issues in U.S. Comparisons with selected international cases. Concurrently scheduled with course C179. S/U or letter grading.

  • C276. Health in Chicano/Latino Population

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for graduate students. Examination of Chicano/Latino health status through life expectancy, causes of death, reportable diseases, services utilization, provider supply, and risk behaviors within demographic/immigration changes. Binational review of health effects in U.S. and Mexico. Concurrently scheduled with course CM106. Letter grading.

  • C277. Latino Social Policy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of social welfare of Latinos (Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans) in U.S. through assessment and critical analysis of social policy issues affecting them. Survey of social, economic, cultural, and political circumstances affecting ability of Latinos to access public benefits and human services. Concurrently scheduled with course C177. Letter grading.

  • 279. Globalization and Transnationalism

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Interdisciplinary seminar that integrates political-economical, historical-sociological, and anthropological-cultural perspectives to help students develop critical political-economical analysis of interplay between globalization (of flows of people, material goods, information, and political-cultural influences) and localized transnational dynamics that together are giving meaning and constructing new social identities and strategies for struggle throughout world. S/U or letter grading.

  • 280. Urban Social Inequality

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Examination of several key social and urban inequalities in U.S. Survey of three key contemporary issues of inequality primarily from sociology and urban planning/studies: income distribution (poverty), work and employment (labor), and neighborhoods (space/geography). Through wide range of methods, approaches, and theoretical frameworks examined, exposure to key research on inequality. S/U or letter grading.

  • 281. Central American Migration and Integration

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Through empirical research cycle and informed with relevant theoretical frameworks, students develop research questions based on migration and integration experiences of Central American immigrants in greater Los Angeles area. Students conduct qualitative research, analyze original data, and write final papers that contextualize findings within existing social scientific literature. S/U or letter grading.

  • 282. Chicana/Chicano Legal History

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Legal history of Chicanas/Chicanos in U.S. from mid-19th century to present, with emphasis on critical race theory. Examination of landmark legislation and key appellate decisions that have impacted Chicano/Latino community. Topics include critical race theory, Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, legal construction of Mexican American racial identity, historic educational segregation, contemporary educational issues, jury rights, Chicano movement, and undocumented immigration. S/U or letter grading.

  • M289. Studies in Chicana/Chicano Literature

    Units: 4

    (Same as English M261.) Seminar, three hours. Intensive research and study of major themes, authors, and issues in Chicana/Chicano literature and culture. Examination of political, aesthetic, economic, and cultural context that emerges in Chicana/Chicano discourse; limits of investigation set by individual instructor. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 291. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Chicana and Chicano Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Research seminar organized around readings and engaged discussion of critical topic of interest in field. Exploration of issue, its theoretical implication for field, and practical implications for communities. Topics vary according to participating faculty members. Final research project required. May be repeated for credit with consent of director of graduate studies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 495. Learner-Centered Teaching in Chicana/Chicano Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Designed for graduate students and required of all new department teaching apprentices. Interactive forum for discussing learner-centered teaching in Chicana/Chicano studies. Exploration of diverse classroom strategies and pedagogical techniques specific to interdisciplinary field. Topics include preparing for discussion sections, promoting discussion among students, using class websites, office hours, grading, and campus resources. May be repeated once for credit. S/U grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual Study or Research

    Units: 4 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Directed individual research and study in area related to Chicana/Chicano studies or subjects not offered as regular courses, arranged individually by student and instructor. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units. S/U or letter grading.

  • 597. Preparation for M.A. Comprehensive Examination or Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to departmental graduate students. Reading and preparation for M.A. comprehensive examination or Ph.D. qualifying examinations. Mandatory and supplemental reading lists prepared by student advisory committees. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units. S/U grading.

  • 598. Research for M.A. Thesis

    Units: 4 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to departmental graduate students who have completed all M.A. coursework requirements. Research for and preparation of M.A. thesis under direction of thesis committee chair. May not be applied toward M.A. degree requirements. May be repeated for maximum of 12 units. S/U grading.

  • 599. Research for Ph.D. Dissertation

    Units: 4 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to Ph.D. students who have passed qualifying examinations. Research for and preparation of Ph.D. dissertation under direction of dissertation committee chair. May not be applied toward Ph.D. degree requirements. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. S/U grading.