• 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • M110. Inequality and Democracy: Analysis and Praxis of Public Problems

    Units: 4

    (Same as Social Welfare M110.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Analysis and praxis of public problems. Taking up case of persistent inequality in liberal democracies, coverage of key frameworks and methodologies for understanding and analyzing poverty and inequality and examination of forms of action, from role of government to social movements, that seek to intervene in such problems. Study of problems, programs, policies, and politics in globally interconnected, transnational world, while avoiding analytical divide between global north and global south. Letter grading.

  • 120. Introduction to Cities and Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Survey of urban history and evolution in U.S., urban social theory, current growth trends, system of cities, urban economy and economic restructuring, traditional and alternative location theories, urban transportation, and residential location and segregation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 121. Urban Policy and Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of current urban planning and policy issues and debates, such as normative theories of good urban form, metropolitan organization and governance, economic development and growth management, edge cities, spatial mismatch hypothesis, urban poverty, racial/ethnic inequality, gender and urban structure, sustainability, and future of cities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M122. Policy, Planning, and Community

    Units: 4

    (Same as Asian American Studies M108.) Lecture, three hours; field laboratory. Project-oriented methods course on conducting needs assessment in Asian American communities. Geographic information systems to be used to define problems and needs. Letter grading.

  • 129. Special Topics in Urban Policy and Research

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of particular planning/policy subfield (e.g., economic development, environmental planning, housing and community development, international planning and development, land use, or urban design) in some depth. Specific topic area rotates depending on instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 130. Fundamentals of Urban and Regional Economics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Preparation: one introduction to microeconomics course. Most U.S. population lives and works in urbanized areas, and world's population is becoming more urbanized with each passing decade. National, state, and local governments are engaged in managing, planning, policymaking, and governance in urban context. Ultimate efficacy of those public activities can be enhanced by understanding of economic forces acting on urban areas. Basic concepts related to location choice, agglomeration effects, economies of scale, and specialization by cities and transportation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C133. Political Economy of Urbanization

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to new approaches to urban studies, basic concepts and analytical approaches of urban political economy, with major emphasis on American urban problems and restructuring of modern metropolis. Topics include historical geography of urbanization, development and transformation of urban spatial structure, suburbanization and metropolitan political fragmentation, urban fiscal crisis, and role of urban social movements. Concurrently scheduled with course C233. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM137. Southern California Regional Economy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M180.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to regional economy, with emphasis on Los Angeles. Key economic sectors, labor market composition, and review of conflicting portrayals depicting dynamics of region. Two all-day bus tours of key economic regions and guest lectures by regional experts included. Concurrently scheduled with course C237C. Letter grading.

  • M140. Issues in Latina/Latino Poverty

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chicana and Chicano Studies M121 and Labor and Workplace Studies M121.) Lecture, four hours. Examination of nature and extent of urban and rural poverty confronting Latina/Latino population in U.S. Special emphasis on antipoverty policies of government and nonprofit organizations and social planning and economic development strategies. Attention also to literature on underclass. Letter grading.

  • 141. Planning with Minority Communities

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Overview of planning history, theory, and contemporary issues that affect low-income communities, communities of color, and underserved neighborhoods, particularly in Los Angeles area. Field of planning offers distinct perspectives and opportunities for improving vulnerable communities. Topics range from discussion of intersection between race and income, critical race theory, community development, residential segregation, spatial mismatch, and environmental justice to social justice. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M150. Transportation Geography

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M149.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of geographical aspects of transportation, with focus on characteristics and functions of various modes and on complexities of intra-urban transport. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 151. Urban Transportation Economics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Big cities offer many attractions, but high density also produces traffic congestion and air pollution. Can we have dense urban areas without congested traffic and polluted air? Analysis of economic explanations for transportation problems and examination of possible solutions. Because university campuses resemble small cities, they are used as examples to explore various policies (such as BruinGO at UCLA) that universities have adopted to improve transportation. Letter grading.

  • M160. Environmental Politics and Governance

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M164.) Lecture, three hours. Environmental planning is more than simply finding problems and fixing them. Each policy must be negotiated and implemented within multiple, complex systems of governance. Institutions and politics matter deeply. Overview of how environmental governance works in practice and how it might be improved. Letter grading.

  • M163. California Sustainable Development: Economic Perspective

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M135 and Public Policy M149.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of specific environmental challenges that California faces. Microeconomic perspective used, with special emphasis on incentives of polluters to reduce their pollution and incentives of local, federal, and state government to address these issues. Focus on measurement and empirical hypothesis testing. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M164A. Documentary Production for Social Change: Mobility in Los Angeles

    Units: 5

    (Same as Disability Studies M164A.) Seminar, three hours; fieldwork, two hours. Exploration of documentary filmmaking as catalyst for social change, using daily commute in Los Angeles as case study. Introduction to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, disability, and class on experiences of commuting, access to public transportation, and car-based versus alternative (bike and pedestrian) forms of commuting. Exposure to observational, interview-based, and participatory documentary shooting and editing techniques, as well as social marketing strategies that are vital to documentary production and distribution. Letter grading.

  • M165. Environmentalism: Past, Present, and Future

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M132 and Geography M115.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of history and origin of major environmental ideas, movements or countermovements they spawned, and new and changing nature of modern environmentalism. Introduction to early ideas of environment, how rise of modern sciences reshaped environmental thought, and how this was later transformed by 19th-century ideas and rise of American conservation movements. Review of politics of American environmental thought and contemporary environmental questions as they relate to broader set of questions about nature of development, sustainability, and equity in environmental debate. Exploration of issues in broad context, including global climate change, rise of pandemics, deforestation, and environmental justice impacts of war. Letter grading.

  • CM166. Global Environment and Development: Problems and Issues

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M128.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Questions of population, resource use, Third World poverty, and environment. Analysis of global economic restructuring and its connections to changing organization of production and resulting environmental impacts. Case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and U.S. Concurrently scheduled with course C266. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M167. Environmental Justice through Multiple Lenses

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M167.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of intersection between race, economic class, and environment in U.S., with focus on issues related to social justice. Because environmental inequality is highly complex phenomenon, multidisciplinary and multipopulation approach taken, using alternative ways of understanding, interpreting, and taking action. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M171. Planning Issues in Latina/Latino Communities

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chicana and Chicano Studies M122 and Labor and Workplace Studies M122.) Lecture, four hours. Exploration of socioeconomic, demographic, and political forces that shape low-income communities and analyses of planning intervention strategies. Emphasis on community and economic development and environmental equity. Letter grading.

  • CM172. Labor and Economic Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Labor and Workplace Studies M171.) Lecture, three hours. Exploration of economic development and identification of ways that labor and labor unions directly and indirectly influence and shape economic development. Wide range of roles that labor plays, and could play, in promoting and supporting economic development for all. Concurrently scheduled with course C271B. Letter grading.

  • M175. Women and Cities

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies M175.) Lecture, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Examination of relationship between women and cities: (1) how cities have affected women's opportunities for economic and social equality, (2) women's contributions to development of U.S. cities, and (3) contemporary strategies and efforts to create urban environments that reflect women's needs and interests. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C184. Looking at Los Angeles

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to history and physical form of Los Angeles, with emphasis on understanding social, economic, and political issues in development of Los Angeles. Concurrently scheduled with course C284. Letter grading.

  • 185SL. Community-Based Research in Planning

    Units: 4

    Seminar, one hour; fieldwork, three hours. Preparation: at least four Urban and Regional Studies minor courses, of which at least one should be related to subject area of service learning setting. Limited to junior/senior minor students. Designed to serve as complement to service learning requirement and may be used to fulfill capstone requirement for minor. Students are matched to public, private, or nonprofit agency through Center for Community Learning and must complete minimum of 30 hours of work. Duties and responsibilities to be set by students and sponsoring organizations. Readings to be determined in consultation with instructor. P/NP grading.

  • M187. Latino Metropolis: Architecture and Urbanism in Americas

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chicana and Chicano Studies M187 and History M151E.) Lecture, four hours. Introduction to history of architecture and urbanism in Americas, from fabled cities of Aztec empire to barrios of 21st-century Los Angeles and Miami. Emphasis on role of cities in Latina/Latino experience and uses of architecture and city planning to forge new social identities rooted in historical experiences of conquest, immigration, nationalization, and revolution. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, four hours. Limited to junior/senior CAPPP Program students. Internships in Washington, DC, through Center for American Politics and Public Policy. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports of their experience. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors and departmental honors programs. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 195. Community Internships in Urban Planning

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, 12 hours. Limited to junior/senior Urban and Regional Studies minors. Internship in supervised setting in community agency or urban planning setting. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports of their experience. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP grading.

  • 199. Directed Research in Urban Planning

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M201. Theories of Architecture

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design M201.) Lecture, three hours. Exploration of conceptual and historical structures that shape current issues in architectural theory. Readings in primary texts serve as framework for understanding nature of speculative inquiry in architectural context. Letter grading.

  • 202A. Land Use

    Units: 3 or 4

    Lecture, three hours. Course 202A is enforced requisite to 202B. Exploration of 21st-century land-use public controls, private practice, and litigation in California from basic planning, zoning, subdivision controls, and official mapping to regional growth management, sustainability, and environmentally sensitive land protection. Concurrently scheduled with Law 286. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 202B).

  • 202B. Land Use

    Units: 1 or 2

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 202A. Continuation of course 202A. Exploration of 21st-century land-use public controls, private practice, and litigation in California from basic planning, zoning, subdivision controls, and official mapping to regional growth management, sustainability, and environmentally sensitive land protection. Concurrently scheduled with Law 286. S/U or letter grading.

  • M203. Housing Segregation, Housing Discrimination, and Evolution of Public Policy

    Units: 1 to 8

    (Same as Law M526.) Seminar, three hours; two field trips. Consideration of selected aspects of housing law and policy, including current federal and state housing subsidies; remedies of housing consumers; impacts of market discrimination against children, racial minorities, and women; and local governmental laws influencing cost and supply, such as antispeculation and rent control legislation. Catalytic role of economic and community development in expansion of housing supply also considered. Letter grading.

  • M203A. Seminar: Housing Segregation, Housing Discrimination, and Evolution of Public Policy

    Units: 1 to 8

    (Same as Law M526.) Seminar, three hours; two field trips. Course M203A is enforced requisite to 203B. Consideration of selected aspects of housing law and policy, including current federal and state housing subsidies; remedies of housing consumers; impacts of market discrimination against children, racial minorities, and women; and local governmental laws influencing cost and supply, such as antispeculation and rent control legislation. Catalytic role of economic and community development in expansion of housing supply also considered. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 203B).

  • 203B. Seminar: Housing Segregation, Housing Discrimination, and Evolution of Public Policy

    Units: 1 to 8

    Seminar, three hours; two field trips. Enforced requisite: course M203A. Continuation of course M203A. Consideration of selected aspects of housing law and policy, including current federal and state housing subsidies; remedies of housing consumers; impacts of market discrimination against children, racial minorities, and women; and local governmental laws influencing cost and supply, such as antispeculation and rent control legislation. Catalytic role of economic and community development in expansion of housing supply also considered. Letter grading.

  • M204. Research Design and Methods for Social Policy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M218.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Limited to graduate students. How to become more sophisticated consumers and producers of qualitative and quantitative policy research. In first half of course, formal principles of research design; in second half, various data collection methods, including ethnography, interviewing, and survey design. Letter grading.

  • 205A. M.U.R.P. Comprehensive Examination: Applied Planning Research Project I

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Required of all second-year students completing applied planning research project M.U.R.P. comprehensive examination capstone option. Guides students through identifying topics, selecting clients, developing scope of work and memorandum of understanding with clients, completing research design and literature review portions of applied planning research project, and collecting data. Letter grading.

  • 205B. M.U.R.P. Comprehensive Examination: Applied Planning Research Project II

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour. Required of all second-year students completing applied planning research project M.U.R.P. comprehensive examination capstone option. Guides students through completion of data collection, analysis, findings, conclusions, and recommendations portions of applied planning research project. Preparation of executive summary and poster synthesizing their work. Letter grading.

  • M206A. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M224A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: one graduate-level statistics course, familiarity with one packaged statistics program. Principles of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and applied techniques of using spatial data for mapping and analysis. Topics include data quality, data manipulation, spatial analysis, and information systems. Use of mapping and spatial analysis to address planning problem. Letter grading.

  • M206B. Advanced Geographic Information Systems

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M224B.) Studio, three hours. Requisite: course M206A or Public Policy M224A. Advanced topics in geographic information systems (GIS) utilizing geoprocessing tools in ArcMap, map design, and spatial analysis. Letter grading.

  • 207. Applied Microeconomics for Urban Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Preparation: passing score on microeconomics examination given first day of class. Practical use of economics in analyzing public resource allocation problems. Topics include review of marginal analysis, difference between equity and efficiency, public goods and free rider problem, environmental pricing, public service pricing, and conflicts between individual and collective rationality. Letter grading.

  • 208A. Colloquium in Planning Research

    Units: 4

    Lecture, one hour; discussion, two hours. Required of first-year Ph.D. students. Introduction to design and execution of planning research; exploration of subfields of planning scholarship and approaches to research on contemporary planning topics. Preparation and filing of Ph.D. program of study. Letter grading.

  • 208B. Introduction to Research Design

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Required in first or second year of Ph.D. program. Identification of planning problems, formulation of research questions, review of literature and identification of gaps, development of researchable hypotheses, understanding of strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative methodologies, understanding of threats to validity, review of critiques of traditional methods and of alternative approaches to scholarship. Letter grading.

  • 208C. Advanced Research Design

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Required of all Ph.D. students who have passed their field examinations but have not yet advanced to candidacy, and all M.U.R.P. students completing their thesis capstone option. Advanced research design course that guides students in selecting problem/question to study, reviewing previous research on problem/question, framing specific research questions/hypotheses, and selecting methodology and plan for testing hypotheses. Students complete and orally defend their dissertation/thesis proposal. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209. Special Topics in Planning Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Topics in planning theory selected by faculty members. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 211. Law and Quality of Urban Life

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to law as urban system, directed primarily toward those interested in intersection of law and policy: broad array of urban issues examined, as is law's role as partial cause and cure of urban problems. Examination of law as changing process rather than collection of principles, so that students develop facility to interact with law and lawyers in positive and forceful manner. S/U or letter grading.

  • 212. International/Comparative Planning Workshop

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours; field trips, five to 10 days. Topics of planning and policy in various international or domestic sites. Topics may include urban design, urban development, urban governance, land use, environmental issues, transportation, infrastructure planning, housing development, community development, and/or physical planning. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 214. Neighborhood Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Experience with GIS and statistical software useful but not necessary. Methods-oriented studio course, with focus on developing data and analytical skills required to profile and analyze neighborhoods. Working in teams students develop quantitative neighborhood profiles that can used in community planning and at other geographical levels (e.g., cities, counties, and regions). Students gain professional experience and produce product that benefits larger community. Data management and analysis, including accessing, cleaning, and presenting data. Letter grading.

  • M215. Spatial Statistics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M205 and Statistics M222.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Survey of modern methods used in analysis of spatial data. Implementation of various techniques using real data sets from diverse fields, including neuroimaging, geography, seismology, demography, and environmental sciences. S/U or letter grading.

  • 216. Food Studies Graduate Certificate Colloquium

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to Food Studies Graduate Certificate Program students. Food is complex subject given that production, procurement, preparation, consumption, and exchange of edible matter is biologically vital to human growth, development, and function and critical to many aspects of society and culture. Food studies is growing cross-disciplinary field of research, teaching, and advocacy that encompasses and draws from cultural anthropology and geography, food law and policy, urban planning, sociology, literature, history, public health, nutrition, environmental science, molecular and cell biology, science and technology studies (STS), agronomy, and other disciplines. Survey of some of these wide-ranging topics and disciplines that define food studies. Letter grading.

  • 217A. Comprehensive Planning Project

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Designed for second-year students. Comprehensive project brings together students of varying backgrounds and interests in joint solution of urban planning problem. Each project spans two terms. Successful completion of project meets requirements of Comprehensive Examination Plan A of M.A. program. S/U grading.

  • 217B. Comprehensive Planning Project

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Designed for second-year students. Comprehensive project brings together students of varying backgrounds and interests in joint solution of urban planning problem. Each project spans two terms. Successful completion of project meets requirements of Comprehensive Examination Plan A of M.A. program. S/U grading.

  • 218. Graphics and Urban Information

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; studio, one hour. Presentation of basic graphic methods and tools for conceptualization, analysis, and documentation of built environment. Development of fundamental skills of graphic ideation and communication. Letter grading.

  • 219. Special Topics in Built Environment

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Topics in built environment selected by faculty members. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 220A. Quantitative Analysis in Urban Planning I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, 90 minutes. Preparation: passing score on basic mathematics proficiency examination given first day of class. Introduction to mathematical and statistical concepts and methods with applications in urban planning. Review of basic mathematical concepts fundamental to planning methods; linear and nonlinear functions focusing on growth curves and mathematics of finance; data measurement and display; descriptive statistics and probability. Introduction to use of computer as tool in analysis of planning-related data. Letter grading.

  • 220B. Quantitative Analysis in Urban Planning II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, 90 minutes. Requisite: course 220A or equivalent as demonstrated by passing score on mathematics proficiency examination given first day of course 220A. Introduction to concepts of statistical inference and modeling, with emphasis on urban planning applications. Topics include sampling, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlation, and simple and multiple regression. Use of computer as tool in statistical analysis and modeling. Letter grading.

  • 222A. Introduction to Planning History and Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, 90 minutes. Required of first-year M.U.R.P. students, typically in Fall Quarter; required of first-year Ph.D. students who have not completed comparable graduate course in planning history and theory. Exploration of planning thought and practice over time, leading authors and key issues in field of planning, traditional and insurgent histories of planning, and alternative approaches to planning for multiple and pluralistic publics. Letter grading.

  • 222B. Advanced Planning History and Theory I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Required of first-year Ph.D. students. Major ideas and theories of planning that have influenced its development from early-19th century to present. Letter grading.

  • 222C. Advanced Planning History and Theory II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Required of first-year Ph.D. students. Major ideas and theories of planning that have influenced its development from early-19th century to present. Letter grading.

  • 228. Visual Communication Skills

    Units: 2

    Five-week course. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, one hour. Greater emphasis on graphic presentation and visual communication to educate stakeholders, advocate for change, and encourage participation in planning process in recent years, in both public and private sector. Visual communication requires analytic skills and strategic thinking, strong foundation in design theory, and technical skills in computer programs. Introduction to Adobe InDesign and Illustrator and foundation in design theory and communication. How to use graphic design and presentation programs (i.e., Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, GIS, PowerPoint) to create attractive and powerful planning materials and reports, design principles to communicate ideas in clear, succinct, and engaging manner, and when and how to use graphic materials to support verbal presentations or written reports. Letter grading.

  • 229. Special Topics in Planning Methods

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Topics in planning methodology selected by faculty members. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M230. Introduction to Regional Planning

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M241.) Lecture, three hours. Critical and historical survey of evolution of regional planning theory and practice, with particular emphasis on relations between regional planning and developments within Western social and political philosophy. Major concepts include regions and regionalism, territorial community, and social production of space. Letter grading.

  • 232. Disaster Management and Response

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Through readings and presentations, examination of disaster management and response in both U.S. and developing countries. Exploration of how disaster impacts and risk reduction both relate to economic, vulnerability, and political factors, in addition to acts of nature. Structured to allow students to focus on distinct disaster contexts and themes as set out in reading and weekly sessions. Letter grading.

  • C233. Political Economy of Urbanization

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to new approaches to urban studies, basic concepts and analytical approaches of urban political economy, with major emphasis on American urban problems and restructuring of modern metropolis. Topics include historical geography of urbanization, development and transformation of urban spatial structure, suburbanization and metropolitan political fragmentation, urban fiscal crisis, and role of urban social movements. Concurrently scheduled with course C133. S/U or letter grading.

  • M234A. Development Theory

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M229A.) Lecture, three hours. Review of basic literature and schools of thought on development theory through analysis of impact of mercantilism, colonialism, capitalism, and socialism on various urban and rural social and economic structures in Third World. Presentation, through evaluation of theoretical writings and case studies, of complexity and diversity of developing countries. Emphasis on linkages between policy and rural and urban impacts. Gives students important background for courses M234B, M234C, and many other planning courses addressing Third World issues. Letter grading.

  • M234B. Ecological Issues in Planning

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M229B.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: course M265. Science and politics of modern environmentalism and planning in light of transformations inherent in global change, including how to address these questions in ways that go beyond green consumerism and bifurcation of wild, ecological, and human environments. American environmentalism has become dominant model for many conservation practices. Informed by Muirist model of idea of untrammeled nature with people-less set-asides for spiritual and scientific contemplation of nature; this approach used in environmental policy and as key idea in conservation and fragment biology. At opposite end is environmental planning devoted to infrastructure in hyper-human habitats (cities). Exploration of these competing models and many reasons to be skeptical of both in 21st century. Letter grading.

  • M234C. Resource-Based Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M229C.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: course M234A. Some major issues associated with development of specific natural resources. Topics include nature of particular resource (or region associated with it), its previous management, involvement of state, corporations, and local groups, and environmental and social impact of its development. Letter grading.

  • 235A. Urbanization in Developing World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Course 235A is not requisite to 235B. Questions of urbanization and planning in low- and middle-income countries. Case studies from Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Lectures, student presentations, and policy debates. Letter grading.

  • 235B. Civil Society, Nongovernmental Organizations, and Social Movements in Developing World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Questions of civil society, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and social movements in low- and middle-income countries. Case studies from Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Lectures, student presentations, and policy debates. Letter grading.

  • M236A. Theories of Regional Economic Development I

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M230A and Public Policy M240.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to theories of location of economic activity, trade, and other forms of contact between regions, process of regional growth and decline, reasons for different levels of economic development, relations between more and less developed regions. Letter grading.

  • M236B. Globalization and Regional Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M230B.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course M236A. Application of theories of regional economic development, location, and trade learned in course M236A to contemporary process known as globalization. Examination of nature and effects of globalization on development, employment, and social structure, along with implications for policy. Letter grading.

  • 236C. Advanced Workshop on Regions in World Economy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course M236B. Advanced workshop on regional development examining changes in organization of production systems, their geographies, and processes that affect regional performance in globalized environment. Letter grading.

  • 237A. Sectoral Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Introduction to methods and procedures of sectoral investigation as applied to regions, industries, companies, and their labor forces. Current theories and conceptions of industrial structure and industrial change. Investigation of characteristics and trends of industry subsectors in Los Angeles resulting in industry profile that can serve as aid to planning and shaping economic development. Letter grading.

  • 237B. Urban and Regional Economic Development Applications

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Survey and analysis of economic development strategies in U.S. Because economic development strategies seek to modify or shape existing conditions, focus on how policies attempt to harness dynamics associated with new forms of industrialization, intensified global competition, and interrelationships among capital, labor, and state. Letter grading.

  • C237C. Southern California Regional Economy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to regional economy, with emphasis on Los Angeles. Key economic sectors, labor market composition, and review of conflicting portrayals depicting dynamics of region. Two all-day bus tours of key economic regions and guest lectures by regional experts included. Concurrently scheduled with course CM137. Letter grading.

  • 238. Global Labor Markets

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Consideration of labor-related programs, policy, and strategy in international and comparative context. Review of major approaches to improving quality, quantity, and access to jobs, including training, regulation, migration policy, organizing strategies, and social safety net. Global in scope, with particular reference to countries of global south. Letter grading.

  • 239. Special Topics in Regional and International Development

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Topics in urban and regional development selected by faculty members. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M240. Local Government

    Units: 2 to 6

    (Same as Law M285.) Lecture, three hours. Analysis of structure and function of local, regional, and state government in historical and institutional context: organization, finance, intergovernmental relations, role of judiciary, public services, lawmaking, citizen participation through initiatives and referenda, and government tort liability. Letter grading.

  • M241. Foundations of Social Welfare Policy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M260 and Social Welfare M221A.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Nature, roles, and history of welfare institutions in different societies; applicable social system theory of different components of welfare system; theory and research about welfare policies and organizational forms. S/U or letter grading.

  • 242. Poverty and Inequality

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of relationship between urbanization and spatial inequality in U.S. -- spatial dynamics of urban growth, levels and causes of spatial inequality, and implications of spatial inequality for low-income communities. Topics include concentrated poverty, residential segregation, immigrant neighborhoods, spatial disparities in access to opportunities, housing mobility, neighborhood health and safety, urban infrastructure, and political cohesion and participation. Analysis of role of policies in promoting and/or reducing spatial inequities. Letter grading.

  • M243. Privatization, Regulation, and Public Finance

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M293.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: Public Policy 201. Evaluation of economic and political determinants of trend toward privatizing public services, and equity and efficiency outcomes of this trend as expressed through new pricing, financing, and service-level policies. Exploration of new regulatory role this trend implies for state and local governments. Letter grading.

  • 244. Urban Poverty and Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of determinants of urban poverty, with emphasis on poverty in U.S. and on geographical dimensions of poverty and planning interventions that contribute to poverty reduction. Topics include relationship between poverty and human and social capital, demographic change, low-wage labor market, spatial concentration of poor, residential segregation, and social policy. Letter grading.

  • 245. Urban Public Finance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 207, 220A. Theory and practice of urban public finance, with emphasis on methods used to fund public infrastructure. Topics include fiscal impact analysis of real estate development, effects of taxes on land-use decisions, benefit assessments to finance neighborhood public investment, private and intergovernmental contracting as method of supplying urban public services, tax increment finance for urban redevelopment, and municipal bond market. S/U or letter grading.

  • M246. Poverty, Poor, and Welfare Reform

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M214 and Social Welfare M290L.) Lecture, three hours. Major policy and research issues concerning poverty and social welfare policy directed toward poor in U.S. S/U or letter grading.

  • 247. Planning for Multiple Publics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Exploration of planning needs of various social groups in urban settings, using existing literature and research studies to determine appropriate mechanisms of planning for multiple publics. Analysis of communities in Los Angeles metropolitan area to gain insights into practical, theoretical, and methodological problems of planning for multiple publics. Generally taken in first year. S/U or letter grading.

  • M248. Law and Poor

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M295 and Social Welfare M290R.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Study of major income-maintenance programs in U.S., with emphasis on interaction of moral attitudes toward poor and structure and implementation of law, policy, and administration. Current reform consensus and major reforms. Letter grading.

  • 249. Special Topics in Transportation Policy and Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Topics in transportation policy and planning selected by faculty members. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M250. Transportation and Land Use: Urban Form

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M220.) Lecture, three hours. Historical evolution of urban form and transportation systems, intrametropolitan location theory, recent trends in urban form, spatial mismatch hypothesis, jobs/housing balance, transportation in strong central city and polycentric city, neotraditional town planning debate, rail transit and urban form. Letter grading.

  • 251. Transportation and Land Use: Parking

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Parking is key link between transportation and land use, but that link has been widely misunderstood. Transportation engineers typically assume that free parking simply is there at end of most trips, while urban planners treat parking as transportation issues that engineers must study. No profession is intellectually responsible for parking, and everyone seems to assume that someone else is doing hard thinking. Mistakes in planning for parking help to explain why planning for transportation and land use has in many ways gone slowly, subtly, incrementally wrong. Study of theory and practice of planning for parking and examination of how planning for parking in U.S. has become planning for free parking. Exploration of new ways to improve planning for parking, transportation, and land use. Letter gradin

  • 252. Transportation and Land Use: Transportation and Urban Design Studio

    Units: 4

    Studio, three hours. Students of different backgrounds and interests collaboratively and individually analyze and propose solutions for actual transportation planning and urban design problem. Course simulates real-world professional planning project of type that students might be assigned if working for consulting firms or public agencies. Students acquire ability to collect and synthesize evidence typically marshaled by transportation planning and urban design professionals, urban and site analysis capabilities, design and physical planning skills, and data analysis and design presentation and re-presentation abilities. Letter grading.

  • M253. Travel Behavior Analysis

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M221.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 207 and 220B, or Public Policy 201 and 203. Descriptions of travel patterns in metropolitan areas, recent trends and projections into future, overview of travel forecasting methods, trip generation, trip distribution, mode split traffic assignment, critique of traditional travel forecasting methods and new approaches to travel behavior analysis. Letter grading.

  • 254. Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Walking and bicycling are essential components of sustainable transportation systems. In response to growing concerns about access, safety, public health, equity, climate change, and community sustainability issues, many government agencies and private developers are planning to improve pedestrian and bicycle transportation. Exploration of field's relationship to land use and transportation planning, public health, and environment. Detailed knowledge provided of various bicycle and pedestrian facilities and their appropriate contexts. Examination of bicycle and pedestrian planning in context of overall street design. Essential components of bicycle and pedestrian planning, including policies, programs, funding, and advocacy. In-class exercises and out-of-class planning projects. Letter grading.

  • M255. Transportation Policy and Planning

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M244.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to analysis, management, and operation of transportation systems. Topics include evaluating transportation system performance, causes and management of traffic congestion, transportation systems and demand management, complete streets, goods movement, shipping, aviation, and high-speed rail policy and planning, public transportation planning, transportation services for elderly and disabled, and intelligent transportation systems. Letter grading.

  • M256. Transportation Economics, Finance, and Policy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M222.) Lecture, three hours. Overview of transportation finance and economics; concepts of efficiency and equity in transportation finance; historical evolution of highway and transit finance; current issues in highway finance; private participation in road finance, toll roads, road costs and cost allocation, truck charges, congestion pricing; current issues in transit finance; transit fare and subsidy policies, contracting and privatization of transit services. Letter grading.

  • 257. Transportation and Economic Outcomes

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of equity issues related to urban transportation, with focus on complex relationships among urban spatial structure, transportation (travel patterns and transportation investments), and economic outcomes. Role of transportation in improving economic outcomes for low-income and minority households and communities. Letter grading.

  • M258. Transportation and Environmental Issues

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M223.) Lecture, three hours. Regulatory structure linking transportation, air quality, and energy issues, chemistry of air pollution, overview of transportation-related approaches to air quality enhancement; new car tailpipe standards; vehicle inspection and maintenance issues; transportation demand management and transportation control measures; alternative fuels and electric vehicles; corporate average fuel economy and global warming issues; growth of automobile worldwide fleet; automobile in sustainability debate. Letter grading.

  • 260. Environmental Politics and Governance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Environmental planning is more than simply finding problems and fixing them. Each policy must be negotiated and implemented within multiple, complex systems of governance. Institutions and politics matter deeply. Overview of how environmental governance works in practice and how it might be improved. Letter grading.

  • 260A. Environmental Assessment of Urban Systems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to practice of environmental assessment intended for planners and environmental professionals working in a carbon-constrained, climate-impacted future. Letter grading.

  • 260B. Green Urban Studio: Designing Living Neighborhoods

    Units: 4

    Studio, three hours. Students gain detailed knowledge of both established and emerging performance-based methods for addressing issues of energy, water, waste, food, transportation, habitat, biomimicry, and local economies at district or neighborhood scale. Letter grading.

  • 261. Land-Use Planning: Processes, Critiques, and Innovations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Understanding of techniques, processes, strategies, and dilemmas of land-use planning. Despite strong criticisms and demonstrated shortcomings, land-use control remains integral part of planning practice. How does land-use control work? How has it evolved? What are problems with traditional land-use control mechanisms? How well do innovations in land-use planning address criticisms? What is role of land-use planning in good society? S/U or letter grading.

  • 262. Urban Environmental Problems: Water Resources

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Water access affects quality of life and livelihoods both in California and across low and middle income countries. Examination of similarities and distinctions between relevant water access issues in both contexts. To date, water resources planning has been devoted almost exclusively to engineering and technical capacity of service delivery systems. Focus here on social, political, and economic drivers of access, inequality of access, and related conflicts. Water resource governance issues primarily considered at subnational, city, and household scales. S/U or letter grading.

  • M263. Introduction to Environmental Policy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M252.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to basic concepts and methods of environmental analysis covering variety of topics with cross-disciplinary perspectives. Development of ability to analyze major environmental and resource issues as well as to read, discuss, and write critically about environmental policy. Letter grading.

  • 264. Environmental Law

    Units: 4 or 6

    Lecture, three or four hours. Examination of field of environmental law through analysis of various legal issues and public policy: legal consequences of public decision-making strategies and allocation of primary responsibility for various environmental decisions. Focus on air pollution and Clean Air Act as means of illustrating policy issues underlying field. Concurrently scheduled with Law 290. S/U or letter grading.

  • 264A. Environmental Law

    Units: 3 or 4

    (Formerly numbered M264A.) Lecture, three hours. Course 264A is enforced requisite to 264B. Examination of field of environmental law through analysis of various legal issues and public policy: legal consequences of public decision-making strategies and allocation of primary responsibility for various environmental decisions. Focus on air pollution and Clean Air Act as means of illustrating policy issues underlying field. Concurrently scheduled with Law 290. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 264B).

  • 264B. Environmental Law

    Units: 1 or 2

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 264A. Continuation of course 264A. Examination of field of environmental law through analysis of various legal issues and public policy: legal consequences of public decision-making strategies and allocation of primary responsibility for various environmental decisions. Focus on air pollution and Clean Air Act as means of illustrating policy issues underlying field. Concurrently scheduled with Law 290. S/U or letter grading.

  • M265. Environmentalisms

    Units: 4

    (Same as Geography M265.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Review of environmental theories and their practices in dynamic U.S. and international contexts. Issues of climate change, scenario planning, and matrix ecology and its implications in both urban and rural settings. Exploration of problematics of increasing internationalization (or international implications) of environmental practices as part of both green and black economies. What does integrated environmental planning look like in this century? Letter grading.

  • 265B. Environmentalisms

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Reading-intensive exploration of politics, broadly defined, of natures, and its associated forms of environmental ideologies and forms of governance. Examination of new paradigms triggered by intensive urbanization, migration, biodiversity and climate changes, and evolution of new environmental practices. Study moves between debates in theory and debates in practice. Letter grading.

  • 265B. Urban Environments and Socioecologies (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Reading-intensive exploration of politics, broadly defined, of natures, and its associated forms of environmental ideologies and forms of governance. Examination of new paradigms triggered by intensive urbanization, migration, biodiversity and climate changes, and evolution of new environmental practices. Study moves between debates in theory and debates in practice. Letter grading.

  • 265C. Food Systems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Review of array of food and production systems, systems of distribution, and systems of consumption to address most widespread human impacts on planetary biodiversity, landscapes, climates, and social systems. Letter grading.

  • C266. Global Environment and Development: Problems and Issues

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Questions of population, resource use, Third World poverty, and environment. Analysis of global economic restructuring and its connections to changing organization of production and resulting environmental impacts. Case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and U.S. Concurrently scheduled with course CM166. S/U or letter grading.

  • M267. Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy CM250.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 207 and 220B, or Public Policy 204 and 208. Survey of ways economics is used to define, analyze, and resolve problems of environmental management. Overview of analytical questions addressed by environmental economists that bear on public policies. Letter grading.

  • M268. Policy Analysis of Emerging Environmental Technologies

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M286.) Lecture, three hours. Acquisition and utilization of economic, finance, planning, and policy analytic tools needed to evaluate factors that drive market adoption from early to middle market phases. Rooftop solar, electric vehicle, and energy efficiency as focal examples, with emphasis on role of policy and planning incentives intended to spur adoption. Letter grading.

  • 269. Special Topics in Environmental Analysis and Policy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Topics in environmental analysis and policy selected by faculty members. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M270. Homelessness: Housing and Social Service Issues

    Units: 4

    (Same as Social Welfare M206A.) Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes; one field trip. Review of current status of homelessness: who homeless are, what social services and housing are available, existing and proposed programs -- appropriate architecture, management, and sources of funding. Outside speakers include providers of services to homeless. Letter grading.

  • 271A. Community Economic Development

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 271.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to fundamentals of community economic development and neighborhood development strategies. Overview of basic approaches, important concepts, resources and language of field, and major strategies for revitalization of low-income neighborhoods. Letter grading.

  • C271B. Labor and Economic Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Exploration of economic development and identification of ways that labor and labor unions directly and indirectly influence and shape economic development. Wide range of roles that labor plays, and could play, in promoting and supporting economic development for all. Concurrently scheduled with course CM172. Letter grading.

  • M272. Real Estate Development and Finance

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design M272.) Lecture, two hours; workshop, two hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 220A, 220B. Recommended for first-year students in community development and built environment area of concentration. Introduction to real estate development process specifically geared to students in planning, architecture, and urban design. Financial decision model, market studies, designs, loan packages, development plan, and feasibility studies. Lectures and projects integrate development process with proposed design solutions that are interactively modified to meet economic feasibility tests. S/U or letter grading.

  • 272B. Advanced Real Estate Studio

    Units: 4

    Studio, three hours. Study combines disciplines of planning, urban design, construction, real estate finance and investment, and property operations and management. Students learn about behind-the-scene negotiations and decisions, and gain better ability to determine real estate project feasibility, deeper understanding about financing methods and alternatives, and knowledge about ways to frame development programs for success. Letter grading.

  • 273. Site Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture, 90 minutes; laboratory, 90 minutes. Requisite: course 274. Introduction to principles of site planning for urban areas. S/U or letter grading.

  • 274. Introduction to Physical Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture/workshop, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Designed for students with no prior physical planning background and for first-year M.A. students in community development and built environment, design and development, and transportation policy and planning concentrations. Introductory overview of physical planning, land use, site analysis, and surveys; regulatory structures and social/community impacts. Letter grading.

  • M275. Community Development and Housing Policies: Roles of State, Civil Society, and Nonprofits

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M243 and Social Welfare M290U.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Designed for graduate students. Examination of role of U.S. housing policy and role of government agencies and community organizations. Is problem housing or economic development? Should interventions be directed toward inner city housing markets or through neighborhood strategies? What lessons can be learned from experiences of other countries? Letter grading.

  • M276A. Urban Housing

    Units: 1 to 8

    (Same as Law M287.) Lecture, three hours. Course M276A is enforced requisite to 276B. Examination of past 40 years of federal and state programs to stem urban decline and improve housing in U.S.; comparison and contrast of legal and policy initiatives in areas of public housing, housing segregation, mortgage subsidies, landlord/tenant law, urban renewal, and community organizing. Research paper required. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 276B).

  • 276B. Urban Housing

    Units: 1 to 8

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M276A. Continuation of course M276A. Examination of past 40 years of federal and state programs to stem urban decline and improve housing in U.S.; comparison and contrast of legal and policy initiatives in areas of public housing, housing segregation, mortgage subsidies, landlord/tenant law, urban renewal, and community organizing. Research paper required. S/U or letter grading.

  • 277. Historic Preservation: Principles and Practices

    Units: 4

    Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Overview of preservation field, including history and theory, current legislation, tax incentives, preservation planning, landmark and district surveys and designations, adaptive reuse, citizen involvement, and social issues. S/U or letter grading.

  • 278. More Jobs, Better Jobs: Work and Policy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Central issues in urban economic development is jobs -- how to create them, how to help disadvantaged populations get access to them, and how to ensure that they are of adequate quality in terms of wages, advancement, and skill development. Examination of how urban labor markets work and what can be done to help them work better, with focus on U.S. Particular emphasis on low-wage, low-skill workers and marginalized groups, such as inner-city people of color and immigrants. Analyses of how urban labor markets work with discussions of policy options for making them work better and range of solutions, including job creation, workforce training, job ladder creation, union and community organizing, and immigration reform. Examination of power and economic inequality and how to make changes. Letter grading.

  • 279. Seminar: Public Space

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Investigation of changes in production, consumption, design, and meaning of public space and analysis of socioeconomic, political, and cultural factors that lie behind them. Letter grading.

  • 280. Affordable Housing Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 220A, 220B. Overview of basic concepts and skills utilized in nonprofit development initiatives, especially by community-based organizations. Focus on nonprofit provision of subsidized housing, emphasizing way professionals broker debt and equity funding from private, governmental, and philanthropic sources. Use of client projects and negotiation exercises. S/U or letter grading.

  • 281. Introduction to History of Built Environment in U.S.

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Open to advanced undergraduates with consent of instructor. Introduction to history of physical forms of urbanization in America; survey of economic, political, social, and aesthetic forces behind creation of built environments. S/U or letter grading.

  • 282. Urban Design: Theories, Paradigms, Applications

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Discussion and evaluation of philosophical bases, ideologies, and paradigms of urban design in last century; examination of how these are reflected on built environment of cities. Letter grading.

  • 283. Community Research and Organizing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of theory and practice of organizing, analysis of role of community organizing as empowerment strategy in disadvantaged and marginalized communities, and relationship of community and worker organizing to broader movements for social change. Analysis of different research methods and strategies in terms of best supporting organizing and movement building, with focus on community-based participatory research (CBPR). Understanding of theories, principles, and strategies of CBPR, appreciation of advantages and limitations of this approach, and skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPR projects. Analysis in depth of one organizing model and participation in ongoing research project that supports one local community or worker organization, exploring links between research and organizing campaign to which it is connected. Particular attention to race, gender, and class dimensions of CBPR and issues of power and decolonizing research. Letter grading.

  • C284. Looking at Los Angeles

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to history and physical form of Los Angeles, with emphasis on understanding social, economic, and political issues in development of Los Angeles. Concurrently scheduled with course C184. Letter grading.

  • 285. Women and Community Development: Great Gender Debates

    Units: 4

    Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Relationship between planning, community development, and women, with attention to interaction of gender, race, and class/ethnicity. Examples from domestic and international developments. Alternative theories and methods to close gaps between household needs and urban policies. Preparation of written and oral critical reviews of literature and research paper. Letter grading.

  • M286. Management Challenges and Tools for Nonprofit Sector

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M226 and Social Welfare M290V.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Designed for graduate students. Fundamental building blocks for successful management in nonprofit sector. Students develop management skills in strategic thinking/problem solving, project management, team building, and negotiation. Use of case studies to troubleshoot critical challenges, from finance to crisis management to marketing, that nonprofit managers typically face. Letter grading.

  • M287. Politics, Power, and Philanthropy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M227 and Social Welfare M290S.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Use of political economy perspective to analyze forces that have shaped rise and characteristics of nonprofit sector and its constituent elements. Examination of social history of nonprofit sector in U.S. Exploration of legal and policy environments and distinct organizational forms. Comparative perspective between U.S. and other countries. S/U or letter grading.

  • M288. Leadership, Development, and Governance of Nonprofit Organizations

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M228 and Social Welfare M241E.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Designed for graduate students. Various patterns of community action for attaining social welfare objectives; research and field experience directed toward study of social problems within context of community planning; emerging patterns of physical, economic, and social planning within framework of social change theory. Letter grading.

  • 289. Sprawl and Smart Growth

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Suburbs are not new, but metropolitan areas in U.S. and elsewhere continue to grow rapidly at their edges in ways that many consider poorly planned. Discussion of causes and impacts of sprawl as it relates to smart growth. Letter grading.

  • M290. Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M247 and Social Welfare M241F.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Designed for graduate students. Technical processes of problem solving regarding substantive social welfare problems at community level. This form of community practice fills niche between professional and knowledge and skill set possessed by agency and program administrators on one hand and by policy analysts and policymakers on other. Letter grading.

  • M291. Introduction to Sustainable Architecture and Community Planning

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design CM247A.) Lecture, three hours. Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land. Letter grading.

  • M292. Elements of Urban Design

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design M271.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction of basic knowledge of elements and methods of urban design. Multidisciplinary approach leading to understanding of political, socioeconomic, and technological framework of urban systems and its dynamic interrelations. S/U or letter grading.

  • M293. Politics, Ideology, and Design

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design M293.) Lecture, three hours. Exploration of cultural and political context of architecture and planning work. Examination of theory and practice from variety of perspectives applied to set of varied physical environments and to set of current spatialized concepts. Consideration of theoretical propositions that are shaping present urban and architectural debate and concrete case studies where politics and ideology shape design process. Letter grading.

  • 294. Housing in Developing Countries: Policy Objectives and Options

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of relevance of public policies and their intended and unintended effects on housing demand and supply in developing countries. How definition of housing problems, and scope of solutions, has changed over time. Critical assessment of some key solutions that have been tried in past, their advantages, shortcomings, and resultant trade-offs, and likely directions for future housing policy. Letter grading.

  • M295. Introduction to Urban Humanities

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design M295.) Seminar, six hours; studio, six hours. Core introduction to urban humanities. Analytical and descriptive methods of humanities paired with speculative and projective methods of architectural and urban design to better understand contemporary state of human environment. Focus on Los Angeles, with concepts seminar, methods laboratory, projects studio, and site visit components. Offered in summer only. S/U or letter grading.

  • 297. Current Issues in Urban Planning

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. Current issues in urban planning selected by students in conjunction with faculty members. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 298. Special Topics in Emerging Planning Issues

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. Topics in newly emerging planning issues such as role of cutting-edge technology, innovative policies, and experimental programs. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • M404. Joint Planning/Architecture Studio

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design M404.) Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour; studio, four hours. Opportunity to work on joint planning/architecture project for client. Outside speakers; field trips. Examples of past projects include Third Street Housing, Santa Monica; New American House for nontraditional households; Pico-Aliso Housing, Boyle Heights; working with resident leaders at Los Angeles City public housing developments. S/U or letter grading.

  • M470. Improving Worker Health: Social Movements, Policy Debates, and Public Health

    Units: 4

    (Same as Community Health Sciences CM470 and Environmental Health Sciences M471.) Lecture, three hours; fieldwork, two hours. Examination of intersection between work, health, and environment, analysis of social causes of health disparities, investigation of historical trends and social movements, interpretation of current policy debates, and development of innovative interventions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 496. Field Projects

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, four hours. May not be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 501. Cooperative Program

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: consent of UCLA graduate adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

  • 596. M.A. Research in Planning

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, three hours. May be repeated once for credit. S/U grading.

  • 597. Preparation for M.A. Comprehensive Examination or Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations

    Units: 4 to 12

    Tutorial, four hours. May be repeated for credit by Ph.D. students. S/U grading.

  • 598. Preparation for M.A. Thesis in Urban Planning

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, four hours. May be repeated but may be applied toward degree only once. S/U grading.

  • 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research in Planning

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.