• 6. Introduction to Data Analysis

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Not open for credit to students with credit for course 6R. Introduction to collection and analysis of political data, with emphasis on application of statistical reasoning to study of relationships among political variables. Use of computer as aid in analyzing data from various fields of political science, among them comparative politics, international relations, American politics, and public administration. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 6R. Introduction to Data Analysis -- Research Version

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced corequisite: course 50R. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 6. Introduction to collection and analysis of political data, with emphasis on application of statistical reasoning to study of relationships among political variables. Use of computer as aid in analyzing data from comparative politics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 10. Introduction to Political Theory

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exposition and analysis of selected political theorists and concepts from Plato to the present. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 20. World Politics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Required of all students concentrating in Field II. Introduction to problems of world politics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 30. Politics and Strategy

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Introduction to study of strategic interaction in political applications. Use of game theory and other formal modeling strategies to understand politics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 40. Introduction to American Politics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Basic institutions and processes of democratic politics. Treatment of themes such as constitutionalism, representation, participation, and leadership coupled with particular emphasis on the American case. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 50. Introduction to Comparative Politics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 50R. Comparative study of constitutional principles, governmental institutions, and political processes in selected countries. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 50R. Introduction to Comparative Politics -- Research Version

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced corequisite: course 6R. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 50. Comparative study of constitutional principles, governmental institutions, and political processes in selected countries, with emphasis on presentation and evaluation of quantitative evidence. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 60. Ethics and Governance

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). To study question of can't we all just get along, students play games of cooperation, coordination, collaboration, and competition and examine whether and how diversity, disagreement, and democracy influence game play, to understand under what conditions diversity feeds productively or counterproductively into group effort. Development of self- and other-awareness of emergent properties of disagreement to appreciate how different kinds of social organization promote or undercut social cognition and collective action. Such understanding needs to develop bottom-up through experiential and interactive learning, active and analytical learning, systems thinking, and real-world application. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 88S. We, The Corporations

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Corporations today are able to exercise unmatched influence over government. Debate on corporate power over politics by examining how corporations influence government in order to produce policies that protect their economic interests. Comparisons drawn between different eras of American history to understand the relationship between big business and government. Overview of constitutional provisions and lobbying and possible approaches to reigning in corporate power. P/NP grading. Facilitated by Austin Barraza, with Steven P. Bilakovics as faculty mentor.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • M105. Economic Models of Public Choice

    Units: 4

    (Same as Economics M135.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: any lower division political science course. Enforced requisite: Economics 11. Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of methods and consequences of arriving at collective decisions through political mechanisms. Topics include free-rider problem, voting and majority choice, demand revelation, and political bargaining. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M111A. Ancient and Medieval Political Theory

    Units: 4

    (Same as Classics M121.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, St. Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, and More and questions such as forms of government, citizenship, justice, happiness, rhetoric, religion, emotion. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 111B. Early Modern Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Machiavelli, More, Montaigne, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Smith, Condorcet, and Kant and questions such as representation, property, autonomy, and political economy. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 111C. Late Modern Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Bentham, De Tocqueville, Hegel, Mill, Marx, Nietzsche, Arendt, and Foucault and questions such as alienation, power, participation, and difference. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 112A. Democratic Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Critical analysis of selected major authors, issues, and arguments in contemporary democratic theory.

  • M112B. Invention of Democracy

    Units: 5

    (Same as Classics M125.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Democracy was invented in ancient Greece as political form grounded on equality before law, citizenship, and freedom. It came into existence as struggle by "demos," people, aware of its excellence and proud of its power, "kratos." It became only regime capable of including all members of community while disregarding wealth, status, and diverging interests. Examination of history and theory of ancient democracy. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 113A. Problems in 20th-Century and Contemporary Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Study and interpretation of theorists who have focused their analyses on social and political problems of 20th century. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 113B. Politics, Theory, and Film

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Recommended requisite: course 10. Designed for juniors/seniors. Intense and individualized examination of politically significant films with respect to central issues in political theory such as power and truth in light of relevant political theorists. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 114A. American Political Thought I, 1620 to 1865

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 114.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of American political thinkers from Puritan period to Civil War. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 114B. American Political Thought II, 1865 to Present

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Course 114A is not requisite to 114B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of American political thinkers from Reconstruction to present. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M115C. Citizenship and Public Service

    Units: 4

    (Same as Civic Engagement M115.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Recommended requisite: course 10. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of ways in which political thinkers have conceived of ideas of citizenship and public service, how these ideas have changed over time, and frameworks for thinking about citizenship in era of markets and globalization. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 115D. Diversity, Disagreement, and Democracy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Can't we all just get along? Study of diversity, disagreement, and democracy. Diversity covers individual differences, cultural differences, and human universals; groupism, factionalism, and identity politics; multiculturalism and one-world ethics. Disagreement includes moral, ideological, and party-political disagreement; resolvable and irresolvable kinds of disagreement; groupthink and group polarization; herding and information cascades. Democracy stands for political mechanisms of information aggregation; political mechanisms to resolve differences, or to keep peace among people with irresolvable differences; emergence and spread of democracy, liberty, and rule of law. Letter grading.

  • 115E. Humanist Practice and Civic Culture

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10, M115C. Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of connection between humanist practices (philosophy, sociability, science, republican self-fashioning) and promotion of civic ethos -- culture that would promote flourishing civil society. How has humanism informed our Western understanding of republicanism and civic responsibility? What aspects of our humanist heritage maintain relevance for world that many describe as posthumanist? What form of civic culture is most appropriate for North American citizens in 21st century? P/NP or letter grading.

  • 116A. Marxism

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Critical analysis of origins, nature, and development of Marxist political theory. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 116B. Continental Political Thought

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of important text in continental political theory, including relationship between politics and reason, skepticism, and political freedom. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 117. Jurisprudence

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Development of law and legal systems; consideration of fundamental legal concepts; contributions and influence of modern schools of legal philosophy in relation to law and government. Letter grading.

  • 118. Laws of War and Peace from Conquest of America to Declaration of Human Rights (1948)

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 10. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of theories of international relations and international law, with special emphasis on warfare, from conquest of America to end of World War II. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 119. Special Studies in Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one course in Field I. Requisite: course 10. Designed for juniors/seniors. Intensive examination of one or more special problems appropriate to political theory. Sections offered on regular basis, with topics announced in preceding term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M119A. Modern Receptions of Ancient Political Thought

    Units: 4

    (Same as Classics M124.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of how Western culture has conceived and reinterpreted political thought of ancient Greeks and Romans. Topics include examination of influential case(s) of modern reception of classical antiquity. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120A. Foreign Relations of U.S.

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of factors and forces entering into formation and implementation of American foreign policy, with special emphasis on contemporary problems. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120B. World Politics and U.S. Foreign Policy after September 11

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Video lectures by leading scholars as well as live lectures and discussion on complex problems such as terrorism, nuclear proliferation, and Arab-Israeli conflict. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 121A. Studies in Formulation of American Foreign Policy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of formation of American foreign policy with respect to individual cases. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 122A. World Order

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of problems of international system seen as community capable of cooperation and development. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M122B. Global Environment and World Politics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M161.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Recommended requisite: course 20. Politics and policy of major global environmental issues such as climate change, integrating law, policy, and political science perspectives. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 123A. International Law

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of nature and place of international law in conduct of international relations. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 123B. International Organizations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Overview of both theory and functioning of international organizations in promoting international cooperation. Required readings include both statistical and formal models. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124A. International Political Economy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of political aspects of international economic issues. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124C. Politics of Latin American Economic Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Interaction of international and domestic factors in political and economic evolution of Latin America. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 125A. Arms Control and International Security

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Arms control in context of international security in nuclear age. Nuclear arms race; relationship between deterrence doctrines and nuclear war; roles of technology and ideology; nuclear proliferation; outer space. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 126. Peace and War

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Designed for juniors/seniors. Theory and research on causes of war and conditions of peace.

  • 127A. Atlantic Area in World Politics: Western Europe

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. External relations of United Kingdom, West Germany, France, Italy, and other European members of NATO, in regard to European security in context of Atlantic Alliance. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 128A. U.S./Soviet Relations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of relations between the U.S. and former Soviet Union from Revolutions of 1917 to collapse of the U.S.S.R. in 1991.

  • 128B. International Relations of Post-Communist Russia

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 128A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of foeign policy of post-Communist Russia, with special emphasis on Russia's relations with NATO, the former communist states of East Central Europe, China, and the Commonwealth of Independent States.

  • 129. Diplomacy and War

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20 or 137A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of role of diplomacy in great power politics, history of diplomatic institutions, advantages of public and private diplomacy, bilateral and multilateral settings, and theory and practice of deterrence and coercion. Use of game theoretic reasoning and historical analysis. Prior exposure to both useful but not required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 132A. International Relations of Middle East

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Designed for juniors/seniors. Contemporary regional issues and conflicts, with particular attention to inter-Arab politics, Arab-Israeli problem, and Persian Gulf area.

  • M132B. International Relations of Middle East

    Units: 4

    (Same as Honors Collegium M157.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Role of great powers in Middle East, with emphasis on American, Soviet, and West European policies since 1945. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 134. Foreign Policy Decision Making and Tools of Statecraft

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 120A. Designed for juniors/seniors. Contrasts purposive and process models of individual and group decision making. Impact of strategic interaction and situational factors on foreign policy decision making. Implications for policy choice of tools of statecraft (i.e., threats/promises, military/economic/diplomacy). P/NP or letter grading.

  • 135. International Relations of China

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Designed for juniors/seniors. Relations of China with its neighbors and other powers, with emphasis on contemporary interests and policies of China vis-à-vis U.S. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 137A. International Relations Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of various theoretical approaches to international relations. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 138A. International Politics, 1815 to 1914

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Classic period of European great power politics, beginning with peace settlement at end of Napoleonic wars and ending with coming of World War I. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 138B. International Politics, 1914 to the Present

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. First World War, failure of peace settlement, origins of Second World War, Cold War, and post-Cold War period. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 139. Special Studies in International Relations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: two courses in Field II, or course 20 and one course in Field II. Designed for juniors/seniors. Intensive examination of one or more special problems appropriate to international relations. Sections offered on regular basis, with topics announced in preceding term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 140A. National Institutions: Congress

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of those factors which affect character of the legislative process and capacity of representative institutions to govern in contemporary society.

  • 140B. National Institutions: The Presidency

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of nature and problems of presidential leadership, emphasizing impact of the bureaucracy, congress, public opinion, interest groups, and party system on the presidency and national policy-making.

  • 140C. National Institutions: Supreme Court

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to American constitutional development and role of Supreme Court as interpreter of the U.S. Constitution. Reading of Supreme Court cases as well as various historical and current commentaries.

  • M141A. Electoral Politics: Political Psychology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Psychology M138.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of political behavior, political socialization, personality and politics, racial conflict, and psychological analysis of public opinion on these issues. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 141B. Electoral Politics: Public Opinion and Voting Behavior

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of character and formation of political attitudes and public opinion. Role of public opinion in elections, relationship of political attitudes to vote decision, and influence of public opinion on public policy formulation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 141C. Electoral Politics: Political Behavior Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 6, 40, 141B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Advanced course in use of quantitative methods in study of political behavior, especially in relation to voting patterns, political participation, and techniques of political action. Students conduct computer-aided analyses of issues and problems treated in course 141B and similar courses. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 141E. Electoral Politics: Elections, Media, and Strategy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 30. Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of elections and media, including game-theoretic analysis, Downs spatial model of elections, valence characteristics in elections, campaign finance, endogeneity problems in social sciences, liberal bias in media, industrial organization of news industry, and effects of media on voter decisions. May be applied toward Field III or V. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 142A. Political Parties and Interest Groups: Political Parties

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Organization and activities of political parties in U.S. Attention to historical development of parties, nature of party change, campaign functions and electoral role of parties, membership problems and party activists, political finance, and policy formulation practices. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M142D. Understanding Public Issue Life Cycle

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M127.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Recommended preparation: courses 10, 40, and one course from Economics 1, 2, 5, 11, or 101. Examination of how public issue life cycle is shaped by (1) economic and political incentives of various actors -- business, news media, mass public, organized interests, Congress, the president, regulatory agencies, and courts and (2) ideology, cognitive biases, and ethical reasoning. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 143A. Subnational Government: American State Government

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of governments of states of federal union as major sources of public policy in U.S., with government of California as principal topic. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 143B. Metropolitan Governance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of how political, social, economic, and cultural factors influence metropolitan governance in both U.S. central cities and suburban areas. Study of some major issues in metropolitan governance through classic and contemporary readings on political power, political economy of cities, and racial/ economic segregation, as well as political incorporation and racial/ethnic coalitions. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 143C. Politics of American Suburbanization

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of political, social, and economic evolution of American suburbs, particularly in post-WWII era. Dominant themes focus primarily on historical patterns and implications of U.S. racial/ethnic inclusion and exclusion; class conflict and gender roles; classic and contemporary theories of metropolitan governance; and civic/political implications of American suburbanization. Select topics and case studies include housing, schools, and taxes; immigrant and ethnic minority suburbanization; suburban sprawl and uneven growth; suburban decline; and regionalism. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 145A. Public Law and Judicial Process: Anglo-American Legal System

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Evolution of English common law courts and their legal system, with emphasis on development of basic concepts of law which were received from that system in U.S. and remain relevant today. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 145B. Public Law and Judicial Process: Constitutional Law -- Separation of Powers

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Constitutional questions concerning separation of powers, federalism, and relationship between government and property. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 145C. Public Law and Judicial Process: Constitutional Law -- Civil Liberties

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Protection of civil and political rights and liberties under constitution. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 145D. Public Law and Judicial Process: Judicial Oversight of Bureaucracy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Legal controls of administration action. Substantive and procedural limits on administrative discretion imposed by legislation, executive and judicial agencies, and sources of legal powers of administrative bodies within these limits. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 145E. Public Law and Judicial Process: Constitutional Law -- Rights of Accused

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Constitutional rights of persons suspected, accused, and convicted of crimes, with attention to how protections have changed through history. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 146B. Organization Theory, Public Policy, and Administration: Bureaucracy and Public Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: familiarity with American government. Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Nature of bureaucracy in modern government, with emphasis on U.S.; explanation of why government agencies behave as they do. Focus on real and imagined problems with bureaucratic rule; evaluation of commonly proposed solutions for these problems. Examples from schools, armies, welfare bureaus, regulatory agencies, and intelligence services, among others. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 146D. Organization Theory, Public Policy, and Administration: Theories of Organization and Decision Making

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of theoretical frameworks for studying public and private bureaucracies, with emphasis on ideologies, values, behavioral patterns, and concepts of organization. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 146E. Organization Theory, Public Policy, and Administration: National Policy Development and Implementation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Investigation of complex process of policy development and implementation in U.S., including roles of federal, state, and local agencies as well as private organizations. Subsections offered on particular policy areas, with topics announced in preceding term. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 147A. American Political Development: Overview

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to historical development of American politics and ideas and institutions that drive durable change over time. Examination of theories, concepts, and analytical tools at center of developmental inquiry. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 147B. American Political Development: Period Inquiry

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of one period in American political history. Critical features fostering stability and change. Discussion of contributions to structure and content of contemporary American politics. Possible periods, Founding, Reconstruction, Progressive Era, New Deal, and Cold War. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 147C. American Political Development: Institutional Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of one American political institution and its development over time, or interaction of American politics and some aspect of culture and society. Assessment of broader political environment of politics, isolating points of contact, conflict, and pressure for change. Possible topics include party development, Constitution, business regulation, and politics and religion. Sections offered on regular basis, with topics announced in preceding term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 149. Special Topics in American Government and Politics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: course 40, two courses in Field III. Designed for juniors/seniors. Intensive examination of one or more special problems appropriate to American politics. Sections offered on regular basis, with topics announced in preceding term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 150. Political Violence

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of one or several different uses of violence in revolutionary process: demonstrations, mass uprisings, coup d'etat, assassination, and terrorism. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 151A. African Politics: Government and Politics of Africa

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Comparative study of government and politics in contemporary Africa, with special attention to state/society relations, interaction of politics and economic development, political institutions, and conflict and conflict resolution. Letter grading.

  • 151B. African Politics: Political Economy of Africa

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of interactions of economic and political factors in African development, with special attention to political basis of inappropriate economic policy during early post-independence period and change toward a more appropriate economic strategy in recent times. Letter grading.

  • 151C. African Politics: Special Topics in African Politics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in a specific term. Letter grading.

  • 153A. Comparative Government and Politics of Western Europe: West European Government and Politics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 50. Designed for juniors/seniors. Comparison of constitutional and political structure of West European states, with particular attention to contemporary problems. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 154A. Government and Politics in Latin America: States of Middle America

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 50 or 50R. Designed for juniors/seniors. Comparative study of governmental and political development, organization, and practices. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 154B. Government and Politics in Latin America: States of South America

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Comparative study of governmental and political development, organization, and practices. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 156A. Government and Politics of Post-Communist States: Russia

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Intensive study of institutions and political development in Russia, with special attention to legacy of Soviet Union. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 157. Government and Politics in the Middle East

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Comparative study of government in the Arab States, Turkey, Israel, and Iran. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 158. Southeast Asian Politics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 50. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of political environment in major Southeast Asian states. Use of comparative analysis to address major problems confronting region, including democratization, economic growth, drug trade, deforestation, and security threats. Letter grading.

  • 159A. Government and Politics of China: Chinese Revolution and Age of Mao Zedong

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of modern Chinese politics from decline of Manchu dynasty and rise of revolutionary nationalism to death of Mao Zedong, with emphasis on socioeconomic foundations and political dynamics of revolution in modern China.

  • 159B. Government and Politics of China: China in Age of Reform

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of China's political and ideological transformation in post-Mao era. Assessment of impact of changing socioeconomic conditions on revolutionary policies and programs of Chinese Communist Party. Exploration of etiology of 1989 Tiananmen crisis and consequences for China of collapse of Communism in East Europe and the Soviet Union.

  • 160. Government and Politics of Japan

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 50. Designed for juniors/seniors. Structure and operation of contemporary Japanese political system, with special attention to domestic political forces and problems.

  • 163A. Discourse before Democracy

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 163.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Regularities in language used to talk or write about politics across states preceding emergence of universal adult franchises. Problems of collective action in oppression, contribution of shared identities to organizing collective action, role of discourse in cueing awareness of shared identity, evidence across time and space of association between discursive distancing and undemocratic rule (monarchy, exclusive republics, dictatorship). Letter grading.

  • 163B. Colonialism, Discourse, and Democracy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Transformation of language used to talk or write about politics during era of European colonialism and resulting shifts in identity ensuing in political change. Theories of democracy, dynamics of colonial encounter between Europeans and peoples living outside Europe, problems of collective action in tyranny and democracy, consequences of sharing identity for collective action, transformation of discourse in response to colonialism and ensuing enfranchisement in Europe, North America, and Southwest Pacific, spread of enfranchisement following discursive transformations in Russia and in selected states emerging in formerly colonized territories. Letter grading.

  • 164A. Roots of Democracy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of development of democracy around world from its beginnings in ancient Greece to present day. Techniques of comparative politics used to evaluate major arguments about why different countries become democratic at different times, and why some remain authoritarian. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 164B. Fascism and Right-Wing Extremism: Historical and Present Day

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Historical rise of Fascism in Germany, Italy, Japan, and Eastern Europe; its social support and ideology. Focus on Germany, including Nazi economic policy (Tooze, "Wages of Destruction"). Do today's xenophobic movements in Europe and U.S. resemble earlier Fascism in ideology and social base? P/NP or letter grading.

  • 165. Islam and Politics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Religious and spiritual foundations of Islamic legal and political institutions; legitimacy of historical and contemporary Islamic regimes, movements, and ideologies; political strategies of Islamic activism. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 166. Comparative Constitutional Design

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Comparison of major institutional structures such as presidentialism versus parliamentarism, unicameralism versus bicameralism, two-party versus multiparty systems, federal versus unitary systems, plurality versus proportional electoral systems, etc. Method of analysis is rational choice (political actors are assumed to optimize their results given institutional constraints and action of other actors). Result is that institutions affect political outcomes in systematic ways. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M167C. Political Economy of Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as International Development Studies M120.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Political economy approach to puzzle of why some countries are rich and others are poor and why, among latter, some have been able to achieve rapid rates of economic growth and others have not. Explanation and review of logic behind most important arguments that have been advanced to account for differences across countries in rates and levels of economic development. May be applied toward either Field IV or V. Letter grading.

  • 167D. Political Institutions and Economic Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one statistics course. Designed for juniors/seniors. Data analytic approach to question of why some countries are rich and others are poor, with special attention to evidence about how governments and political institutions affect economic development. May be applied toward either Field IV or V. Letter grading.

  • 168. Comparative Political Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: two courses in Field IV, or course 50 and one course in Field IV. Designed for juniors/seniors. Major approaches to study of comparative politics. Concepts and methodology of comparative analysis. Letter grading.

  • 169. Special Studies in Comparative Politics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: two courses in Field IV. Designed for juniors/seniors. Intensive examination of one or more special problems appropriate to comparative politics. Sections offered on regular basis, with topics announced in preceding term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 170A. Studies in Statistical Analysis of Political Data

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 6 or 6R. Designed for juniors/seniors. Use of statistical methods to interpret data and test theories from various fields in political science and use of quantitative evidence in construction of convincing and truthful arguments related to world of politics. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 171A. Applied Formal Models: Collective Action and Social Movements

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 30. Designed for juniors/seniors. How do social and political movements convince people to participate? Consideration of various theoretical perspectives, including game-theoretic, social network, structural, and identity approaches, illustrated by case studies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 171B. Collective Choice and Majority Rule

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 30. Designed for juniors/seniors. How do different ways of counting and casting votes affect political decisions? When can voting rules be manipulated by leaders and voters? Examples from legislative, electoral, and judicial politics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 171C. Legislative Strategy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 30. Designed for juniors/seniors. How do politicians get policy changes passed by legislatures, city councils, and other voting bodies? Applications of game-theoretic reasoning to common strategies and tactics in legislative settings. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 171D. Negotiation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 30. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of negotiation and bargaining in different contexts. Experiential exercises with emphasis on various aspects of negotiation, including coalition formation, honesty, and role of agents. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 172. Strategy and Conflict

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 30. Designed for juniors/seniors. Intermediate topics in game theory applied to political problems, with special attention to strategic consequences of incomplete information and information asymmetries. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 179. Special Topics in Methods and Models

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 30. Designed for juniors/seniors. Intensive examination of one or more special problems related to methods and models in political science. Sections offered on regular basis, with topics announced in preceding term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M180A. African American Political Thought

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M114C and Labor and Workplace Studies M114C.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Intensive introduction to African American political thought, with focus on major ideological trends and political philosophies as they have been applied and interpreted by African Americans. Debates and conflicts in black political thought, historical contest of African American social movements, and relationship between black political thought and major trends in Western thought. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 181A. Politics of Latino Communities

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 181.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one 140-level course or one upper division course on race or ethnicity from history, psychology, or sociology. Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Focus on understanding relationships of power and interaction between institutional contexts of Latino life, such as economy, state, and cultural system on one hand and structure of everyday life in Latino households, neighborhoods, and communities on other. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 181B. Latino Politics in U.S.

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one 140-level course or one upper division course on race or ethnicity from history, psychology, or sociology. Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of history and contemporary role of Latinos as minority group in U.S. political system. Topics include Latino immigration and migration, civil rights movement, citizenship and voting, anti-immigrant attitudes, and political relationships between Latinos and non-Latinos. Analysis of data on Latino public opinion, voting behavior, and political attitudes on broad range of topics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M182. Ethnic Politics: African American Politics

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M144.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one 140-level course or one upper division course on race or ethnicity from history, psychology, or sociology. Requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Emphasis on dynamics of minority group politics in U.S., touching on conditions facing racial and ethnic groups, with black Americans being primary case for analysis. Three primary objectives: (1) to provide descriptive information about social, political, and economic conditions of black community, (2) to analyze important political issues facing black Americans, (3) to sharpen students' analytical skills. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M184A. Black Experience in Latin America and Caribbean I

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M154C.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Culture, history, politics, and identity of African Americans in Spanish and Lusophone Caribbean, South America, and Central America. Exploration of issues of identity in context of Afro/Latino migration to U.S. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M184B. Black Experience in Latin America and Caribbean II

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M154D.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of issues regarding race and ethnicity in Latin America, with emphasis on comparisons to U.S. and within Latin America. Covers populations of African and indigenous origins, with emphasis on former. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 186. Special Studies in Race, Ethnicity, and Politics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Recommended requisite: course 40. Designed for juniors/seniors. Intensive examination of one or more special problems related to race, ethnicity, and politics in political science. Sections offered on regular basis, with topics announced in preceding term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 190. Research Colloquia in Political Science

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Designed to bring together students undertaking supervised tutorial research in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to discuss their own work or related work in discipline. Led by one supervising faculty member. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • 190H. Honors Research Colloquia in Political Science

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Designed to bring together students writing departmental honors theses in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to discuss their thesis work in progress. Led by one supervising faculty member. P/NP grading.

  • 191A. Variable Topics Research Seminars for Majors: Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two upper division courses in field in which seminar is offered. Limited to junior/senior Political Science majors with 3.25 grade-point average in upper division political science courses. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be applied toward distribution or concentration requirement. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 191B. Variable Topics Research Seminars for Majors: International Relations

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two upper division courses in field in which seminar is offered. Limited to junior/senior Political Science majors with 3.25 grade-point average in upper division political science courses. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be applied toward distribution or concentration requirement. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 191C. Variable Topics Research Seminars for Majors: Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two upper division courses in field in which seminar is offered. Limited to junior/senior Political Science majors with 3.25 grade-point average in upper division political science courses. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be applied toward distribution or concentration requirement. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 191D. Variable Topics Research Seminars for Majors: Comparative Government

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two upper division courses in field in which seminar is offered. Limited to junior/senior Political Science majors with 3.25 grade-point average in upper division political science courses. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be applied toward distribution or concentration requirement. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M191DC. CAPPP Washington, DC, Research Seminars

    Units: 8

    (Same as Communication Studies M191DC, History M191DC, and Sociology M191DC.) Seminar, three hours; laboratory, 24 hours. Limited to CAPPP Program students. Seminars for undergraduate students in Center for American Politics and Public Policy's program in Washington, DC. Focus on development and execution of original empirical research based on experiences from Washington, DC-based field placements. Study of variety of qualitative methods (observation, interviewing, etc.), with comparison to quantitative analysis. Examination of features of solid and significant research; intensive writing. Letter grading.

  • 191E. Variable Topics Research Seminars for Majors: Methods and Models

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two upper division courses in field in which seminar is offered. Limited to junior/senior Political Science majors with 3.25 grade-point average in upper division political science courses. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be applied toward distribution or concentration requirement. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 191F. Variable Topics Research Seminars for Majors: Race, Ethnicity, and Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two upper division courses in field in which seminar is offered. Limited to junior/senior Political Science majors with 3.25 grade-point average in upper division political science courses. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be applied toward distribution or concentration requirement. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 191H. Research Design Seminar for Honors Thesis

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Preparation: one course in 191 series, 3.5 grade-point average in upper division political science courses, eligibility for Letters and Science honors. Required of all students who wish to write honors thesis. Students define their research topic, select suitable research method, determine appropriate sources of information, prepare research proposal, find thesis director, begin their research, and submit progress reports or preliminary drafts. Class sessions emphasize critical and constructive discussions of students' topics, methods, and problems in research, as well as general consideration of political science research topics and methods of current or continuing interest. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 193. Journal Club Seminars: Political Science

    Units: 1

    Seminar, two hours. Limited to undergraduate students. Discussion of readings selected from current literature of field. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • 194. Research Group Seminars: Political Science

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field of research of faculty members or students. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • M194DC. CAPPP Washington, DC, Research Seminars

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M194DC and Sociology M194DC.) Seminar, three hours. Limited to CAPPP Quarter in Washington students and other students enrolled in UC Washington Center programs. Seminars for undergraduate students in Center for American Politics and Public Policy's program in Washington, DC. Focus on development and execution of original empirical research based on experiences from Washington, DC-based field placements. Study of variety of qualitative methods (observation, interviewing, etc.), with comparison to quantitative analysis. Examination of features of solid and significant research; intensive writing. Letter grading.

  • 195CE. Community and Corporate Internships in Political Science

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged; fieldwork, eight to 10 hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship in corporate, governmental, or nonprofit setting coordinated through Center for Community Learning. Students complete weekly written assignments, attend biweekly meetings with graduate student coordinator, and write final research paper. Faculty sponsor and graduate student coordinator construct series of reading assignments that examine issues related to internship site. May be repeated for credit with consent of Center for Community Learning. No more than 8 units may be applied toward major; units applied must be taken for letter grade. May not be applied toward concentration or distribution requirements. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M195DC. CAPPP Washington, DC, Internships

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M195DC and Sociology M195DC.) Tutorial, four hours. Limited to junior/senior CAPPP Program students. Internships in Washington, DC, through Center for American Politics and Public Policy. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports of their experience. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP grading.

  • 198. Honors Research in Political Science

    Units: 1 to 4

    Tutorial, two hours. Requisite: course 191H. Limited to juniors/seniors. Development and completion of honors thesis or comprehensive research project under direct supervision of faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research in Political Science

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, two hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 200A. Statistical Methods I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to statistical analysis of political data. Methods of data analysis, estimation, and inference. Letter grading.

  • 200B. Statistical Methods II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: knowledge of elementary calculus. Requisite: course 200A. Applications of multiple regression in political science. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200C. Statistical Methods III

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Preparation: knowledge of elementary calculus. Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Corequisite: course 200CL. Statistical modeling of political processes. Topics include simultaneous equations models, discrete choice models, time-series models. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200CL. Statistical Methods Laboratory III

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, three hours. Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Corequisite: course 200C. Study of theory and application of linear regression analysis in political and social sciences. Starting with basic knowledge of probability theory and statistics, investigation of computation and interpretation of regression results, their statistical justifications, diagnostics for violations of assumptions, stability of results under perturbations of data and models, and extensions into nonstandard situations. Topics may include classical linear model, statistical inference and hypothesis testing, vector geometry of regression, diagnostics, weighted least squares, cross validation and model selection, resampling, outliers, missing data, errors in variables, transformations, robust regression, logistic regression, and modern computing packages. Letter grading.

  • 200D. Quantitative Methods in Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: knowledge of calculus, basic probability, and statistics, including linear regression and experience with computing in R. Recommended requisite: course 200C. Focus on causal inference in social science settings, particularly where randomized experiments may be difficult or impossible to implement. Introduction to commonly used estimation techniques, with focus on conditions under which they produce causal estimates. Emphasis on understanding and maximizing credibility of causal claims researchers can make given pragmatic limitations. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200E. Advanced Topics in Quantitative Methods

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Topics vary each year and have included instrumental variables principal components and scaling, models of selection, models of duration, ecological inference, and hierarchal models. Student-led presentations on relevant statistical theory and applications. Monte Carlo simulations and replications of well-known studies used to demonstrate how various models work and how they are applied in practice. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200X. Data Analysis Workshop

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 200C. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 200Y. Practice in applying statistical techniques to political science data. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200Y. Data Analysis Workshop I

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 200C. Course 200Y is enforced requisite to 200Z. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 200X. Practice in applying statistical techniques to political science data. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200Z. Data Analysis Workshop II

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Enforced requisites: courses 200C, 200Y. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 200X. Practice in applying statistical techniques to political science data. S/U or letter grading.

  • 201A. Introduction to Formal Political Analysis

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of formal political theory to enhance literacy and provide analytical tools without presupposing mathematical background. Model building, collective goods, unanimity and the social contract, voting rules, paradoxes and impossibility theorems, stability, individual liberty and decentralization, strategic manipulation representation, vote trading.

  • 201B. Theory of Collective Choice

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Recommended (but not prerequisite) for political science students: course 201A. Open to any student of politics, economics, philosophy, or mathematics with ability for deductive reasoning. Introduction to abstract, deductive study of voting systems and other collective-choice processes. Axiomatic method applied to politics and political economy, concept of rationality, and agenda control, choice-set or solution concepts.

  • 202. Mathematics for Political Science

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: working knowledge of high school algebra. Survey of mathematical methods useful in political science. Topics include differential and integral calculus, differential equations, optimization, and linear algebra.

  • 203A. Economic Theory and Methods for Political Science I

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Prerequisite: knowledge of elementary calculus. Introduction to techniques of economic analysis and survey of major topics in formal political economy. Investigation of models of regulation, trade protection, collective bargaining, and economic growth as time permits.

  • 203B. Economic Theory and Methods for Political Science II

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Prerequisite: course 203A. Continuing survey of microeconomic techniques used in formal political science, with focus on market failures and on modeling individual choice in nonmarket situations. Specific topics include externalities, public goods and allocation mechanisms, collective action, spatial models, structure-induced equilibrium, and information asymmetries.

  • 204A. Game Theory in Politics I

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of game theory, with emphasis on utilizing mathematical models to understand political and economic phenomena. Applications concern political participation, public goods, legislatures, industrial regulation, bureaucracies, interest groups, and party competition. Designed to help students become informed consumers of game-theoretical literature in political science. S/U or letter grading.

  • 204B. Game Theory in Politics II

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; fieldwork, eight hours. Requisite: course 204A. Intermediate game theory course. Topics include games of incomplete information, cheap talk games, and bargaining theory. Applications concern political participation, public goods, legislatures, bureaucracies, conflict, and communication. Designed to help students use game theory in their research. S/U or letter grading.

  • 204C. Game Theory in Politics III

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; fieldwork, eight hours. Requisites: courses 204A, 204B. Advanced game theory course, with emphasis on new and/or advanced techniques. Topics include timing games, stochastic games, and mechanism design. Applications concern bureaucracies, conflict mediation, and political transitions. Designed to help students use advanced game theory in their research. S/U or letter grading.

  • M208B. Topics in Applied Game Theory

    Units: 4

    (Same as Economics M215.) Lecture, three hours. Prerequisites: calculus or introductory probability, and graduate standing in economics or consent of instructor. Survey and applications of major solution concepts to models of bargaining, oligopoly, cost allocation, and voting power. S/U or letter grading.

  • M208D. Multivariate Analysis with Latent Variables

    Units: 4

    (Same as Psychology M257 and Statistics M242.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to models and methods for analysis of data hypothesized to be generated by unmeasured latent variables, including latent variable analogues of traditional methods in multivariate analysis. Causal modeling: theory testing via analysis of moment structures. Measurement models such as confirmatory, higher-order, and structured-means factory analytic models. Structural equation models, including path and simultaneous equation models. Parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, and other statistical issues. Computer implementation. Applications. S/U or letter grading.

  • M208E. Bayesian Econometrics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Economics M232A.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: Economics 231A, 231B. Subjective probability, introduction to decision theory, Bayesian analysis of regression, sensitivity analysis, simplification of models, criticism. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209. Special Topics in Formal Theory and Quantitative Methods

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 210A. Introduction to Political Theory: Classical and Medieval Formulations from Plato through Aquinas

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Exploration of major texts and issues in political theory.

  • 210B. Introduction to Political Theory: Early Modern Period from Machiavelli through the Enlightenment

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Exploration of major texts and issues in political theory.

  • 212. Seminar: Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 214. Political Theory in Transnational Context

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Critical analysis of selected text from postcolonial, spatial, feminist, postmodern, and post-structuralist theories that assess impact of processes of globalization on such major concepts and problems of traditional social and political theory as sovereignty, citizenship, rights, community, representation, and democracy. S/U or letter grading.

  • 215. Liberalism and Its Critics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Examination of works of one or more major contemporary liberal theorists (Rawls, Dworkin, Habermas, Nussbaum, etc.) in light of alternatives which have been proposed to the liberal position (communitarianism, post-structuralism, group rights theories, etc.). S/U or letter grading.

  • M216. Toleration, Pluralism, and Diversity

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M248.) Seminar, three hours. Prior experience in political or legal theory helpful. Exploration of both abstract concepts of toleration and contemporary disputes. S/U or letter grading.

  • 217. Selected Texts in Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Critical examination of major texts in political theory, with particular attention to their philosophic system, their relations to contemporary political and intellectual currents, and importance of system for present-day political analysis. S/U or letter grading.

  • 218. Selected Topics in Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Critical examination of major problem in political theory. S/U or letter grading.

  • 219. Workshop: Political Theory

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 220A. International Relations Core Seminar I

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Introduction to international relations theory: main schools of thought, methods of analysis, and research styles. Letter grading.

  • 220B. International Relations Core Seminar II

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Further analysis of academic work in international relations and introduction to design of research project in this area. Letter grading.

  • 220C. International Relations Research Seminar

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; tutorial meetings, to be arranged. Design, implementation, and presentation of research project in international relations within combination of seminar and tutorial settings. Letter grading.

  • 222. Seminar: Strategic Interaction

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. A strategic move influences the other person's choice by affecting his expectations of how we will behave. Discussion of theories of deterrence, coercive diplomacy, crisis management, war termination, and negotiation. Use of various theoretical approaches to explaining strategic interaction, including psychology, bargaining theory, and game theory.

  • 223. Politics and Strategies of Modern War

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Analysis of various national security problems in both their military/technical and political dimensions. Letter grading.

  • 225. American Foreign Policy

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Discussion of approaches used to explain foreign policy-making at individual, small group, bureaucratic, and domestic politics levels. Application to selected cases in American foreign policy.

  • 226. Making of American Foreign Policy

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Intensive analysis of policy formulation process and substance of selected contemporary problems in foreign policy. Political and institutional factors affecting foreign policies; analysis of policy options. S/U or letter grading.

  • 227. Foreign Policy Process

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 120A, 220A, 220B. Political science and policy science approaches to national foreign policy process, with primary focus on formulation and implementation of American foreign policy. S/U or letter grading.

  • 230. Contending Perspectives on International Political Economy

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Survey of various theoretical approaches to international political economy.

  • 231. International Political Economy I

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Interaction between international trade and investment and domestic political economics of both industrialized and industrializing societies.

  • 232. International Political Economy II

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Designed to develop Ph.D. students' skills in setting up and solving simple institutional design, political economy macro, signaling, and participation models, as well as two-level game models of domestic politics and international conflict and cooperation, with emphasis on applications in international political economy and comparative politics.

  • 233A. Political Economy Workshop

    Units: 4

    Discussion, two hours. Preparation: successful completion of major field examinations. Workshops for students writing or preparing to write dissertations. Reading and discussion of research in progress presented by UCLA faculty, visiting scholars, and advanced graduate students. Research paper of publishable length and quality required. S/U or letter grading.

  • 233B. Political Economy Workshop

    Units: 4

    Discussion, two hours. Preparation: successful completion of major field examinations. Workshops for students writing or preparing to write dissertations. Reading and discussion of research in progress presented by UCLA faculty, visiting scholars, and advanced graduate students. Research paper of publishable length and quality required. S/U or letter grading.

  • 233C. Political Economy Workshop

    Units: 4

    Discussion, two hours. Preparation: successful completion of major field examinations. Workshops for students writing or preparing to write dissertations. Reading and discussion of research in progress presented by UCLA faculty, visiting scholars, and advanced graduate students. Research paper of publishable length and quality required. S/U or letter grading.

  • 234A. Workshop: National Security, Foreign Policy, and International Relations

    Units: 0

    Discussion, two hours. Course 234A is requisite to 234B, which is requisite to 234C. Courses must be taken in sequence. Open to graduate students who have successfully completed major examinations and intended for students preparing for or working on dissertations. Reading and discussion of research in progress presented by UCLA faculty, visiting scholars, and advanced graduate students. Major research paper required. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of courses 234B and 234C).

  • 234B. Workshop: National Security, Foreign Policy, and International Relations

    Units: 0

    Discussion, two hours. Requisite: course 234A. Courses must be taken in sequence. Open to graduate students who have successfully completed major examinations and intended for students preparing for or working on dissertations. Reading and discussion of research in progress presented by UCLA faculty, visiting scholars, and advanced graduate students. Major research paper required. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 234C).

  • 234C. Workshop: National Security, Foreign Policy, and International Relations

    Units: 12

    Discussion, two hours. Requisite: course 234B. Courses must be taken in sequence. Open to graduate students who have successfully completed major examinations and intended for students preparing for or working on dissertations. Reading and discussion of research in progress presented by UCLA faculty, visiting scholars, and advanced graduate students. Major research paper required. Letter grading.

  • 239. Selected Topics in International Relations

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240A. Seminar: Comparative Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Course 240A is not requisite to 240B. Survey of ideas and approaches that have been historically important in field of comparative politics, with selection of theories and methodologies that have comprised field over time. Letter grading.

  • 240B. Seminar: Comparative Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Course 240A is not requisite to 240B. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in field of comparative politics, with a range of theories and methodologies used by practitioners in the field. Letter grading.

  • 241. African Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in African politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 242. Chinese and East Asian Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in Chinese and East Asian politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243. Japanese and Western Pacific Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in Japanese and Western Pacific politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 244. Latin American Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in Latin American politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 245. Middle Eastern Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in Middle Eastern politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 246A. Western European Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in Western European politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 246B. Political Development of Modern Europe

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Principal phases of political development from high feudalism to the present, together with theories of causation.

  • 247. Politics of Soviet Union and Post-Soviet Region

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in Soviet Union and post-Soviet region politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 247A. Evolution of Soviet and Russian Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Discussion seminar surveying political evolution of Soviet Union and its transformation.

  • 247B. Domestic Context of Russian Foreign Policy

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Examination of domestic social, political, bureaucratic, and organizational sources of Russian foreign and strategic policy. S/U or letter grading.

  • 248. South Asian Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Survey of contemporary research approaches and problems in South Asian politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 251. Political Economy of Economic Reform

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Some familiarity with economics helpful. Principal political and economic arguments for economic reform and consideration of political issues that arise from this process. Letter grading.

  • 252. Parties and Party Systems

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Theories and practices of political parties, party systems, and elections in comparative perspective.

  • 253. Political Change in Communist Systems

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Examination of political context and consequences of structural reform in Communist systems; theories of post-Leninist political pluralization and convergence.

  • 254A. Institutions and Comparative Politics: Comparative Institutional Analysis

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Use of advances of rational choice theory and new institutionalism to compare and analyze major institutional structures, including presidentialism vs. parliamentarism, unicameralism vs. bicameralism, two-party vs. multiparty systems, cadre vs. mass parties, and plurality vs. proportional electoral systems.

  • 254B. Institutions and Comparative Politics: Political Institutions, Delegation, and Policy-Making

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Analysis of political foundations of policy-making. Characterization of democratic institutions as a series of delegations, from voters to elected officials, within parties and legislatures, and from elected politicians to unelected bureaucrats. Examination of implications of different institutional designs for how those delegations are made and controlled.

  • 255. Seminar: Political Economy of Developing Countries

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Interdisciplinary seminar directed toward comparative analysis of political development and modernization. S/U or letter grading.

  • 256. External Sources of Domestic Politics

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Theoretical and historical studies of impact of war and trade on domestic cleavages, policy, and institutions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 257. Labor and Working-Class Politics

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Questions and topics on comparative labor and working-class politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 258. Comparative Politics Proseminar

    Units: 2

    Seminar, 90 minutes. Biweekly speaker series featuring presentation of unpublished research papers by comparative politics faculty members as well as external scholars. Required participation and written assignments. S/U grading.

  • 259. Selected Topics in Comparative Politics

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Critical examination of major problems in comparative politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 260A. Survey Course in American Politics: Political Parties and Electoral Process

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 260B. Survey Course in American Politics: American Political Institutions

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • M261A. Proseminar: Political Psychology

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M236A and Psychology M228A.) Seminar, three hours. Introduction to political psychology: psychobiography, personality and politics, mass attitudes, group conflict, political communication, and elite decision making.

  • 261B. Mass Attitudes and Political Behavior

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 141B or 260A. Analysis of development and change of political attitudes in mass publics and their relationship to voting, protest, and violence. S/U or letter grading.

  • 261C. Political Communication

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Broad survey of research bearing on role of mass media in the American political process. Topics include theories of persuasion, evolution of "media effects" research, reporting and advertising as determinants of election outcomes, adversarial versus deferential journalism, and analyses of media bias.

  • M261D. Seminar: Political Psychology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Psychology M228B.) Discussion, three hours. Requisite: course M261A or Psychology 220A. Examination of political behavior, political socialization, racial conflict, mass political movements, and public opinion. S/U or letter grading.

  • M261E. Critical Problems: Political Psychology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Psychology M228C.) Discussion, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 262. Political Parties

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Critical examination of literature on party systems and organization. Special attention to political functions, electoral campaigns, and party cadres. S/U or letter grading.

  • 264. Politics and Society

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Application of selected classical and contemporary sociological theories to politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 265. Politics and Economy

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Analysis of theoretical and practical relationships between economic organization and governmental institutions. Development and political implications of market system, banking and finance, corporate enterprise, and organized labor. S/U or letter grading.

  • 266. Group Theories of Politics

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Critical appraisal of "group theory" approaches to study of political decision making, with special attention to empirical research problems and findings. S/U or letter grading.

  • 268. Seminar: Political and Electoral Problems

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two graduate courses in politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • M268B. Electoral Democracy: Theory and Behavior

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M246.) Seminar, three hours. Examination of both empirical and normative questions from rich variety of perspectives for scholars in all subfields of political science as well as policy students and others interested in these issues. Consideration of topics fundamental to both democratic theory and study of American politics -- public opinion; nature and purpose of elections; representation; parties; and purpose of democracy as whole -- through both classic political theory treatments and modern research in American political behavior. Letter grading.

  • 269. Seminar: Political Behavior

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 270. Legislative Behavior

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Analysis of major approaches to study of representative institutions, with special emphasis on assumptions, concepts, methods, and theoretical implications associated with each approach. S/U or letter grading.

  • 271. Executive Politics and Presidency

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Analysis of executive organization and leadership, with emphasis on American Presidency. Special attention to theories of organization and personality and relationship between executive and other institutions and groups. S/U or letter grading.

  • 272. Political Environment of Federal Executive

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Examination of political environment of federal executive in the U.S. Special attention to executive/legislative relations. S/U or letter grading.

  • 273. American Political Development

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. National political institutions in historical perspective, theories of state building, state societal relations, political culture. S/U or letter grading.

  • 275. Seminar: American Political Institutions

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 281. Public Policy Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Systematic analysis of nature and scope of public policy and its programmatic implications. Special emphasis on government organizations and process, as well as types of government intervention and stages of policy process. Substantive focus primarily on American public policy and analysis. S/U or letter grading.

  • 284. Seminar: Bureaucracy and Organization

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Exploration of topics in analysis of public and private bureaucracies and organizational theory. Topics include empirical theories of bureaucratic behavior; bureaucratic growth; bureaucratic behavior and political culture; organizational structures and strategies; and function of executive. S/U or letter grading.

  • M287A. Immigration, Racial Change, and Education in 21st-Century Metropolis

    Units: 4

    (Same as Education M289A, Public Policy M289A, and Sociology M290A.) Seminar, four hours. Examination of metropolitan American society and institutions at beginning of 21st century. Consideration of best available information on patterns of settlement, changing functions of urban space and institutions, and issues of opportunity linked to urban structure in society facing unprecedented demographic change that will end primarily European domination of our society by mid-century, creating democracy with no racial or ethnic majority. How this demographic transition and postindustrial transformation of urban functions and space interact to shape opportunity and inequality. Vast economic transformations, brought about by globalization of workplace and dramatic decline of industrial employment in advanced nations, not only greatly raise stakes on creating equal opportunity but also cut off what were previously extremely important parts of intergenerational mobility. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course M289B).

  • M287B. Immigration, Racial Change, and Education in 21st-Century Metropolis

    Units: 4

    (Same as Education M289B, Public Policy M289B, and Sociology M290B.) Seminar, four hours. Examination of metropolitan American society and institutions at beginning of 21st century. Consideration of best available information on patterns of settlement, changing functions of urban space and institutions, and issues of opportunity linked to urban structure in society facing unprecedented demographic change that will end primarily European domination of our society by mid-century, creating democracy with no racial or ethnic majority. How this demographic transition and postindustrial transformation of urban functions and space interact to shape opportunity and inequality. Vast economic transformations, brought about by globalization of workplace and dramatic decline of industrial employment in advanced nations, not only greatly raise stakes on creating equal opportunity but also cut off what were previously extremely important parts of intergenerational mobility. Letter grading.

  • 289A. Approaches to Study of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Analysis of alternative theoretical, methodological, and empirical approaches to study of race, ethnicity, and politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 289B. Current Research on Race, Ethnicity, and Politics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Exploration of current research on race, ethnicity, and politics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 290. Modern Political Economy

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Discussion of implications for understanding politics of thinking of politicians, bureaucrats, producers, consumers, and nations as utility maximizers. Topics include microfoundations for macromodels, forms of political participation, state, government regulation, growth of government, bureaucracy elections, public policy, inflation. S/U or letter grading.

  • 292A. Introduction to Political Inquiry: Problems of Scientific Inquiry and Normative Discourse

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). S/U grading.

  • 292B. Introduction to Political Inquiry: Research Design

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Design of qualitative and quantitative empirical research projects. S/U or letter grading.

  • 293. Great Ideas in Social Sciences

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Vehicle for faculty and visitors to teach research seminars of variable length. Special training opportunities on advanced quantitative methods, including complexity theory, agent-based modeling, experimental economics, social cognitive neuroscience, and evolutionary psychology, to be offered at irregular intervals. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 495. Teaching Political Science

    Units: 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Workshop in teaching techniques, including evaluation of each student's own performance as a teaching assistant. Normally to be taken by all new teaching assistants in first term of their assistantships. May be taken only in term in which students are teaching assistants. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. course requirements. S/U grading.

  • 501. Cooperative Program

    Units: 2 to 8

    Preparation: consent of UCLA graduate adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual Study or Research

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be applied only three times toward minimum course requirement in first two years. May be repeated. S/U or letter grading.

  • 597. Preparation for Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated. S/U grading.

  • 599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated. S/U grading.