• 1A. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Mechanics

    Units: 5

    Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended preparation: high school physics, one year of high school calculus or Mathematics 31A and 31B. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 32A. Recommended corequisite: Mathematics 32B. Motion, Newton laws, work, energy, linear and angular momentum, rotation, equilibrium, gravitation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 1AH. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Mechanics (Honors)

    Units: 5

    Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 31A, 31B. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 32A. Recommended corequisite: Mathematics 32B. Enriched preparation for upper division physics courses. Same material as course 1A but in greater depth; recommended for Physics majors and other students desiring such coverage. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 1B. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Oscillations, Waves, Electric and Magnetic Fields

    Units: 5

    Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 1A, Mathematics 31B, 32A. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 32B. Recommended corequisite: Mathematics 33A. Damped and driven oscillators, mechanical and acoustic waves. Electrostatics: electric field and potential, capacitors, and dielectrics. Currents and DC circuits. Magnetic field. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 1BH. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Oscillations, Waves, Electric and Magnetic Fields (Honors)

    Units: 5

    Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: course 1AH or 1A, Mathematics 31B, 32A. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 32B. Recommended corequisite: Mathematics 33A. Enriched preparation for upper division physics courses. Same material as course 1B but in greater depth; recommended for Physics majors and other students desiring such coverage. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 1C. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Electrodynamics, Optics, and Special Relativity

    Units: 5

    Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 1A, 1B, Mathematics 32A, 32B. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 33A. Recommended corequisite: Mathematics 33B. Ampere law, Faraday law, inductance, and LRC circuits. Maxwell equations in integral and differential form. Electromagnetic waves. Light, geometrical, and physical optics. Special relativity. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 1CH. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: Electrodynamics, Optics, and Special Relativity (Honors)

    Units: 5

    Lecture/demonstration, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 1AH or 1A, 1BH or 1B, Mathematics 32A, 32B. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 33A. Recommended corequisite: Mathematics 33B. Enriched preparation for upper division physics courses. Same material as course 1C but in greater depth; recommended for Physics majors and other students desiring such coverage. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 1Q. Contemporary Physics

    Units: 2

    Review of current problems in physics, with emphasis on those being studied at UCLA. Significance of the problems and their historical context. P/NP grading.

  • 4AL. Physics Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers: Mechanics

    Units: 2

    Laboratory, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 1A or 1AH. Enforced corequisite: course 1B or 1BH. Experiments on measuring gravity, accelerated motion, kinetic and potential energy, impulse and momentum, damped and driven oscillators, resonance and vibrating strings. Computer data acquisition and analysis. Introduction to error analysis, including distributions and least-squares fitting procedures. Letter grading.

  • 4BL. Physics Laboratory for Scientists and Engineers: Electricity and Magnetism

    Units: 2

    Laboratory, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 1A or 1AH, 1B or 1BH. Enforced corequisite: course 1C or 1CH. Experiments on electric forces, fields, and potentials. Magnetic fields. Linear and nonlinear devices. Resistors, capacitors, and inductors. Modern circuits. Geometrical and physical optics. Letter grading.

  • 5A. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Mechanics and Energy

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: Life Sciences 30A, 30B, or Mathematics 3A, 3B, 3C (3C may be taken concurrently). Statics and dynamics of forces, motion, energy, including thermal energy, with applications to biological and biochemical systems. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 5B. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Thermodynamics, Fluids, Waves, Light, and Optics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Requisite: course 5A. Thermal properties of matter, free energy, fluids, ideal gas, diffusion, oscillations, waves, sounds, light, and optics, with applications to biological and biochemical systems. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 5C. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Electricity, Magnetism, and Modern Physics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Requisite: course 5A. Electrostatics in vacuum and in water. Electricity, circuits, magnetism, quantum, atomic and nuclear physics, radioactivity, with applications to biological and biochemical systems. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 6A. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Mechanics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 3A, 3B. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 3C. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 6AH. Motion, Newton laws, energy, linear and angular momentum, rotation, equilibrium, gravity, biological applications. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 6B. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Waves, Electricity, and Magnetism

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 6A or 6AH. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 6BH. Mechanical waves, sound, electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic waves, biological applications. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 6C. Physics for Life Sciences Majors: Light, Fluids, Thermodynamics, Modern Physics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 6B. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 6CH. Geometrical and physical optics, fluid statics and dynamics, thermodynamics. Selected topics from foundations of quantum mechanics; atomics, nuclear and particle physics; relativity; medical detectors; biological applications. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 10. Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1A, 1AH, 6A, or 6AH. Special mathematical preparation beyond that necessary for admission to University in freshman standing not required. Topics include planetary motion, Newton laws, gravitation, electricity and magnetism, wave motion, light, sound, and heat, relativity, quantum mechanics, atoms, and subatomic particles. As time permits, development of physical ideas placed in cultural and historical perspective. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 10. Physics (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1A, 1AH, 5A, or 6A. Special mathematical preparation beyond that necessary for admission to University in freshman standing not required. Topics include planetary motion, Newton laws, gravitation, electricity and magnetism, wave motion, light, sound, and heat, relativity, quantum mechanics, atoms, and subatomic particles. As time permits, development of physical ideas placed in cultural and historical perspective. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 11. Revolutions in Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of modern physics intended for general UCLA students. Overview of classical physics from late 19th century and its growing set of dilemmas. Revolutions of relativity and quantum mechanics that have led to much deeper understanding of structure and evolution of our Universe. Specific topics include special and general relativity, cosmology (Big Bang), quantization of light, nucleus and radioactivity, origin of elements, and quantum mechanics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 12. Physics of Sustainable Energy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Special mathematical preparation beyond that necessary for admission to UCLA in freshman standing not required. Discussion of physics underpinnings of energy sources and consumption, with emphasis on renewables. Global view of energy balance in our lives from point of view of physical processes. Ways in which energy is used in everyday life (transportation, heating, cooling), and ways in which it is produced, covering all common and speculative sources of energy from fossil fuels to solar, wind, nuclear, and fusion. Fundamental physical limitations of each technology to master concepts such as efficiency of thermodynamic cycles and of chemical and nuclear reactions. Quantitative estimation of amount of energy students use in their daily lives and what physical processes could produce it. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 17. Elements of Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), Mathematics 32A, 32B. Enforced corequisite: Mathematics 33A. Photons, photoelectric effect, uncertainty principle Bohr atom, Schrödinger equation, hydrogen atom, Gaussian and Poisson distributions, temperature, entropy, Maxwell/Boltzmann distribution, kinetic theory of gases, laws of thermodynamics, black body radiation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 18L. Modern Physics Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 4AL, 4BL, 17. Experiments on radioactivity, scattering, Planck constant, superconductivity, superfluidity. Letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 87. Introduction to Biophysics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C, or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH, or 6A, 6B, and 6C, Chemistry 20A, 20B, Life Sciences 1, 3, Mathematics 3A, 3B, and 3C, or 31A, 31B, and 32A. Specific examples of diverse biological design such as scaling of metabolic activity, bone and muscle mass, cell size, cell membranes and pumps, heart and blood circulation, swim bladders, insect vision, magnetic bacteria, etc., studied quantitatively using elementary mathematics and physical principles. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 88. Lower Division Seminar: Current Topics in Physics

    Units: 2

    Limited to freshmen/sophomores. Intensive exploration of a particular theme or topic based on current research. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in a specific term. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 98A. Workshop: Numerical Computational Physics

    Units: 1

    Laboratory, one hour. Introductory presentations on three most common mathematical software packages -- Mathematica, Mathcad, and MATLAB. After some familiarization with most common software functions, development of student personal preferences and assessment of advantages and strong points of each by solving problems in computational physics. P/NP grading.

  • 98XA. PEERS Collaborative Learning Workshops for Life Sciences Majors

    Units: 1

    Laboratory, three hours. Corequisite: associated undergraduate lecture course in physics for life sciences majors. Limited to Program for Excellence in Education and Research in Science (PEERS) students. Development of problem-solving skills and intuition in collaborative learning environment. May be repeated three times, but only 1 unit may be applied toward graduation. P/NP grading.

  • 98XB. PEERS Collaborative Learning Workshops for Physical Sciences and Engineering Majors

    Units: 1

    Laboratory, three hours. Corequisite: associated undergraduate lecture course in physics for physical sciences and engineering majors. Limited to Program for Excellence in Education and Research in Science (PEERS) students. Development of problem-solving skills and intuition in collaborative learning environment. May be repeated three times, but only 1 unit may be applied toward graduation. P/NP grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 105A. Analytic Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), Mathematics 32B, 33A. Corequisite: Mathematics 33B. Newtonian mechanics and conservation laws, gravitational potentials, calculus of variations, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, central force motion, linear and nonlinear oscillations. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 105B. Analytic Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 105A. Relativity with four vectors, noninertial reference frames, dynamics of rigid bodies, coupled oscillators, normal modes of oscillation, vibrating strings, and wave propagation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 108. Optical Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 110B. Interaction of light with matter; dispersion theory, oscillator strength, line widths, molecular scattering. Coherence theory, Kirchhoff formulation of diffraction theory, crystal optics, optical rotation, electro and magneto optical effects. Additional topics of fundamental or current interest. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 110A. Electricity and Magnetism

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 131, Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Electrostatics and magnetostatics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 110B. Electricity and Magnetism

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 110A, Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Faraday law and Maxwell equations. Propagation of electromagnetic radiation. Multipole radiation and radiation from an accelerated charge. Special theory of relativity. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 112. Thermodynamics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Corequisite: course 115B. Fundamentals of thermodynamics, including first, second, and third laws. Statistical mechanical point of view and its relation to thermodynamics. Some simple applications. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 114. Mechanics of Wave Motion and Sound

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 105A, 105B, Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Vibrating systems and wave propagation in gases, liquids, and solids, including elements of hydrodynamics and elasticity. Applications in ultrasonics, low-temperature physics, solid-state physics, architectural acoustics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 115A. Quantum Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 17, 105A, 131. Corequisite: course 105B. Classical background. Basic ideas of quantum nature of light, wave-particle duality, Heisenberg uncertainty principle, Bohr atom, physical operators. Schrödinger equation. One-dimensional square well and harmonic oscillator problems. Boundary values. Classical correspondences. Letter grading.

  • 115B. Quantum Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 115A, 131. Formal theory: commutator algebra, Hermitian operators, generalized uncertainty principle, Ehrenfast relations. Three-dimensional problems. Central potentials. Angular momentum. Hydrogen atom. Identical particles and Pauli exclusion principle. Electrons in an electromagnetic field. Letter grading.

  • 115C. Quantum Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 115B. Matrix mechanics. Addition of angular momentum. Time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory. Fermi Golden Rule. Applications. Scattering theory. Letter grading.

  • 116. Electronics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Alternating current circuits, transmission line circuits, transistor and IC circuits to generate, modify, and detect electrical signals, introduction to digital circuits, analysis of noise and methods to reduce its influence in electrical measurements.

  • 117. Electronics for Physics Measurement

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Hands-on experimental course to develop understanding of design principles in modern electronics for physics measurements. Broad introduction to analog and digital electronics from practical viewpoint, followed by examination of typical circuits for scientific instrumentation and study of methods of computer data acquisition and signal processing. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 118. Electronics for Physical Measurements

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, 1C, 117, Mathematics 32A, 32B, 33A. Provides students with opportunity to apply basic knowledge of circuit design for purpose of building stand-alone circuits with function related to control or measurement. Examples of physics-oriented projects include radio-frequency detection and measurement of mechanical resonances of bar, FM transmitter, speed of sound using radio-frequency pulsed ultrasound, sun-following pointers, cosmic ray detector. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M122. Introduction to Plasma Electronics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M185.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 110A or Electrical Engineering 101A. Senior-level introductory course on electrodynamics of ionized gases and applications to materials processing, generation of coherent radiation and particle beams, and renewable energy sources. Letter grading.

  • M122. Introduction to Plasma Electronics (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M185.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 110A or Electrical Engineering 101A. Senior-level introductory course on electrodynamics of ionized gases and applications to materials processing, generation of coherent radiation and particle beams, and renewable energy sources. Letter grading.

  • 123. Atomic Structure

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Corequisite: course 115C. Theory of atomic structure. Interaction of radiation with matter. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124. Nuclear Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Corequisite: course 115C. Nuclear properties, nuclear forces, nuclear structure, nuclear decays, and nuclear reactions. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 126. Elementary Particle Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Corequisite: course 115C. Introduction to physics of elementary particles. The four basic interactions: strong, electromagnetic, weak, and gravitational. Properties of baryons, mesons, quarks, and leptons; conservation laws, symmetries and broken symmetries; the Standard Model; experimental techniques; new physics at the new accelerators. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 127. General Relativity

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 105B, 110A, 110B, 131. Recommended: courses 115A, 115B, 115C. Introduction to general relativity. Principle of equivalence and curved spacetime, local inertial frames, vectors and three-dimensional surfaces in curved spacetime. Schwarzchild metric, perihelion precession, bending of light by sun, and gravitational redshift. Star-system applications, black holes, gravitational waves. Introduction to cosmology, including Robertson/Walker metric and expanding universe solution to Friedman equations. Dark energy and cosmological constant. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 128. Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 115A, 115B, 126. Introduction to cosmology and high-energy particle astrophysics, based on latest developments of both experiment and theory. Special emphasis on unified picture of universe that emerges from particle physics, astronomy, and cosmology. Extensive discussion of unsolved problems and future prospects to help students determine their opportunities in future. Letter grading.

  • 131. Mathematical Methods of Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Vectors and fields in space, linear transformations, matrices, and operators; Fourier series and integrals. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 132. Mathematical Methods of Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 131, Mathematics 32B, 33A, 33B. Functions of a complex variable, including Riemann surfaces, analytic functions, Cauchy theorem and formula, Taylor and Laurent series, calculus of residues, and Laplace transforms. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 140A. Introduction to Solid-State Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 112. Introduction to basic theoretical concepts of solid-state physics with applications. Crystal symmetry; cohesive energy; diffraction of electron, neutron, and electromagnetic waves in a lattice; reciprocal lattice; phonons and their interactions; free electron theory of metals; energy bands. Letter grading.

  • 140B. Properties of Solids

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 140A. Elementary discussion of properties of solids. Use of theory of electrons and the lattice to examine properties of semiconductors, metals, and superconductors, together with magnetic and dielectric properties of materials. Properties of noncrystalline solids. Letter grading.

  • 144. Polymer Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 105A, 110A, and 112 or Chemistry 110A. How physical properties of polymers can be derived from mathematical models of chains and coils. Comparison of these models to calculations based on random walk problem and used to predict mechanical characteristics of large molecules. Study of networks of polymers and polymeric fluids, with focus on their viscoelastic properties. Discussion of movement of individual polymers within melts. Study of examples of more complex structures, such as polymer fractals. Consideration of applications of this work to biology, with focus on their potential role in evolution and current hypotheses on origins of life. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 150. Physics of Charged-Particle and Laser Beams

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 110A, 110B, 115A, 115B. Physics of charged-particle and laser beams presented as a unified subject. Basic physics of charged-particle beams, covering relativistic particle motion in electromagnetic fields, transverse focusing, acceleration mechanisms, linear and circular accelerators, and advanced topics. Some fundamentals of laser physics, including gain and broadening mechanisms, linear light optics, laser resonators, and advanced topics and applications. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M155. Energy in Modern Economy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M155.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 1A and 1B (or 6A and 6B), Mathematics 3A and 3B (or 31A and 31B), Statistics 12 or 13. Examination of physics of energy, history of energy development, and role that energy plays in our economy, particularly in transportation and power grid. Prospects for decreasing availability of fossil fuels and impact of global warming on energy development. Current and potential future government and social responses to energy issues. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 160. Numerical Analysis Techniques and Particle Simulations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; computer terminals, six hours. Preparation: minimum knowledge of computer programming (Fortran). Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C (or 1AH, 1BH, and 1CH), 105A, 105B, 110A, 110B. Introduction to field of computer modeling of physical systems using particle models; numerical models and methods, methods of diagnosing results, experience with running interesting physical problems. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180A. Nuclear Physics Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180B. Physical Optics and Spectroscopy Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180C. Solid-State Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180D. Acoustics Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180E. Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180F. Elementary Particle Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M180G. Biophysics Laboratory (Effective Spring 2018 )

    Units: 4

  • M180G. Soft Matter Laboratory

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemistry M120.) Laboratory, four hours. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180N. Computational Physics and Astronomy Laboratory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 188B.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, six hours. Requisites: courses 105A, 105B, 110A, 110B, 112 (or Astronomy 115), 115A, 115B. Prior experience in working with computers helpful but not required. Designed to give first-hand experience in solving physics and astronomy problems on computers. Project-based course, with projects selected from core areas of classical mechanics, electrodynamics, quantum physics, statistical physics, and astronomy. Introduction to problems and to required numerical methods in lectures so students can write programs in one modern programming language of their choice (Python recommended) and carry out numerical experiments with it, with results documented in reports. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180Q. Quantum Optics Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours. Requisite or corequisite: course 115C. Limited to junior/senior Astrophysics and Physics majors. Use of techniques of quantum optics to demonstrate concepts of quantum mechanics, including superposition, quantum measurement, hidden variable theories, and Bell's inequality. Examination and use of modern optics, including lasers, optics, fibers, polarization manipulation, and photon counting. Letter grading.

  • C185. Foundations of Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Historical development and philosophical sources of classical and modern physics. Concurrently scheduled with course C285. Letter grading.

  • C186. Neurophysics: Brain-Mind Problem

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL, 6A, 6B, 6C, Chemistry 14A or 20A, Mathematics 3A, 3B, 3C, 31A, 32A, 32B, 33A. How does mind emerge from brain? Provides summary of basic biophysics of neurons, synapses, and plasticity. Introduction to commonly used experimental and theoretical techniques of measuring, quantifying, and modeling neural activity, and their relative strengths and weakness and use of them to understand link between neural circuits, their emergent neural dynamics, and behavior in example model systems. Discussion of mechanisms of interaction between neural circuits and their role in cognition, learning, and sleep. Computer laboratory component where students learn to write simple codes to quantify neural activity patterns. Concurrently scheduled with course C286. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C186. Neurophysics: Brain-Mind Problem (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C, or 5A, 5B, and 5C, or 6A, 6B, and 6C, Chemistry 14A or 20A, Mathematics 3A, 3B, 3C, 33A. How does mind emerge from brain? Provides summary of basic biophysics of neurons, synapses, and plasticity. Introduction to commonly used experimental and theoretical techniques of measuring, quantifying, and modeling neural activity, and their relative strengths and weakness and use of them to understand link between neural circuits, their emergent neural dynamics, and behavior in example model systems. Discussion of mechanisms of interaction between neural circuits and their role in cognition, learning, and sleep. Computer laboratory component where students learn to write simple codes to quantify neural activity patterns. Concurrently scheduled with course C286. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C187A. Biological Physics I: Life at Rest

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 187.) Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 105A, 110A, 115A, Chemistry 110A, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology 100 (or M140 or 165A). Equilibrium phenomena. Application of basic mechanics, optics, and thermodynamics to biological design: structure of skeleton, scaling of bone and muscle mass, swim bladders, and animal vision. Application of elementary statistical physics, electrostatics, and elasticity to structure of proteins, DNA, and biomembranes. Concurrently scheduled with course C287A. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C187B. Biological Physics II: Life in Motion

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 105A, 110A, 115A, C187A, Chemistry 110A, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology 100. Nonequilibrium phenomena. Application of mechanics, hydrodynamics, diffusion, and electrical transport to dynamical phenomena. Macroscopic phenomena: swimming, flying, thermoregulation, blood circulation, breathing, electrical transport along membranes. Physics of cells: Brownian motion, molecular motors, and cytoskeleton. Concurrently scheduled with course C287B. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188. Special Courses in Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Limited to junior/senior Astrophysics and Physics majors. Departmentally sponsored temporary courses such as pilot courses or those taught by visiting faculty members. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188A. Physics of Energy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, 1C, 17, Mathematics 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A. Description of underlying physics of energy. Energy systems are based on well-known undergraduate-level physics principles such as mechanics, electromagnetism, and thermodynamics. Some understanding of fluid mechanics, quantum physics, statistical mechanics, nuclear physics also helpful, but those concepts introduced as needed. Understanding energy is of primary importance to our world today, as we face serious challenges to finding adequate energy sources to meet world demand, and as energy production is often accompanied by undesirable environmental and social side-effects. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188L. Special Laboratory Courses in Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Limited to junior/senior departmental majors. Departmentally sponsored temporary laboratory courses such as pilot courses or those taught by visiting faculty members. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 190. Research Colloquia in Physics

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Designed to bring together students undertaking supervised tutorial research in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to discuss their own work or related work in discipline. Led by one supervising faculty member. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • 191. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Physics and Astronomy

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Participating research seminar on advanced topics in physics. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. Content varies from year to year. May be repeated for credit by petition. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 192. Undergraduate Practicum in Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Training and supervised practicum for advanced undergraduate students. Students assist in preparation of materials and development of innovative programs with guidance of faculty members in small course settings. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 193. Journal Club Seminars: Physics

    Units: 2

    Seminar, one hour. Limited to undergraduate students. Seminars are linked to speaker-series seminars offered by department on weekly basis. Supplemental reading from literature on speaker's topic, as well as active participation and discussion to understand what kind of questions modern-day physicists actually ask and how they go about answering them. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • 194. Research Group Seminars: Physics and Astronomy

    Units: 1

    Research group meeting, one hour. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group/laboratory. Discussion of research of faculty members or students with regard to understanding methodology in field and laboratory equipment. May be repeated for credit. P/NP grading.

  • 196. Research Apprenticeship in Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, three hours per week per unit. Limited to juniors/seniors with overall 3.0 grade-point average. Entry-level research apprenticeship for upper division students under guidance of faculty mentor. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP grading.

  • 197. Individual Studies in Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 198. Honors Research in Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, 12 hours. Limited to juniors/seniors with overall 3.0 grade-point average. Development and completion of honors thesis or comprehensive research project under direct supervision of faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, two hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 201Q. Modern Physics Research Areas

    Units: 2

    Review of modern physics research areas, with emphasis on those actively pursued at UCLA. S/U grading.

  • 210A. Electromagnetic Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Boundary value problems in electrostatics and magnetostatics. Multipole expansions; dielectrics and macroscopic media. Maxwell equations and conservation laws. Wave guides and resonators; simple radiating systems. Letter grading.

  • 210B. Electromagnetic Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Electromagnetic potentials and Hertz vectors. Cylindrical waves. Spherical waves. Debye potentials. Multipole radiation. Classical relativistic electrodynamics. Radiation from moving charges. Letter grading.

  • 213A. Advanced Atomic Structure

    Units: 4

    Group representation theory. Angular momentum and coupling schemes. Interaction of radiation with matter.

  • 213B. Advanced Atomic Structure

    Units: 4

    N-j symbols, continuous groups, fractional parentage coefficients, n electron systems.

  • 213C. Molecular Structure

    Units: 4

    Application of group theory to vibrational and electronic states of molecules. Molecular orbital theory. Raman effect. Angular momentum and coupling in molecules.

  • 214A. Advanced Acoustics

    Units: 4

    Propagation of waves in elastic and fluid media. Reflection, refraction, diffraction, and scattering of waves in fluids. Attenuation mechanisms in fluids.

  • 214B. Advanced Acoustics

    Units: 4

    Propagation in nonhomogeneous fluids and in moving fluids. Radiation pressure, acoustic streaming, and attenuation in large amplitude sound fields. Propagation of sound in liquid helium. Mechanisms resulting in attenuation for elastic waves in solids.

  • 215A. Statistical Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Microstates and macrostates, statistical ensembles, entropy and other thermodynamic functions, equilibrium, variational principles, functional integration methods. Applications: ideal gas, oscillators, rotors, elasticity, paramagnetism. Indistinguishable particles, Fermi/Dirac and Bose/Einstein distributions. Applications: electron gas, neutron stars, white dwarfs, Bose/Einstein condensation. Kinetics. Letter grading.

  • 215B. Advanced Statistical Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Symmetry characterization of phases of matter, phase transitions, Landay theory, order parameters. Applications: superfluidity, liquid crystals, superconductivity, Higgs mechanism. Scaling theory of critical phenomena, correlation functions, critical exponents, renormalization group methods. Goldstone models and topological defects, spin waves, sound waves, Kosterlitz/Thouless transition. S/U or letter grading.

  • 215C. Quantum Statistical Mechanics and the Many Body Problem

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Classical methods for interacting systems; quantum field theory techniques in statistical mechanics; Green's function approach; Coulomb gas; imperfect Bose gas; electron/phonon interaction; superconductivity; phase transitions; theory of Fermi liquid. S/U or letter grading.

  • M215D. Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics and Molecular Biophysics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemistry M223C.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 215A, or Chemistry C215B and C223B. Fundamentals of nonequilibrium thermodynamics and statistical mechanics applied to molecular biophysics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 220. Classical Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Lagrangian formulation, action, symmetries, conservation laws; Hamiltonian formulation, canonical structure, symmetries. Applications: harmonic oscillators, rotating solids. Special relativistic mechanics, Maxwell field, and dynamics of charged particles. Nonlinear dynamics and global behavior. Letter grading.

  • 221A. Quantum Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics, operators and state vectors, equations of motion. Letter grading.

  • 221B. Quantum Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 221A. Rotations and other symmetry operations, perturbation theory. Letter grading.

  • 221C. Quantum Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Formal theory of collision processes, quantum theory of radiation, introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 222A. Plasma Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Properties of Coulomb gas with and without magnetic field: equilibrium, oscillations, instabilities, fluctuations, collective phenomena, transport properties, and radiation. Description via single-particle orbit theory, magnetohydrodynamics, and kinetic equations of various types. S/U or letter grading.

  • 222B. Plasma Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Properties of Coulomb gas with and without magnetic field: equilibrium, oscillations, instabilities, fluctuations, collective phenomena, transport properties, and radiation. Description via single-particle orbit theory, magnetohydrodynamics, and kinetic equations of various types. S/U or letter grading.

  • 222C. Plasma Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Properties of Coulomb gas with and without magnetic field: equilibrium, oscillations, instabilities, fluctuations, collective phenomena, transport properties, and radiation. Description via single-particle orbit theory, magnetohydrodynamics, and kinetic equations of various types. S/U or letter grading.

  • 223. Advanced Classical Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 220. Topics such as nonlinear mechanics, ergodic theory, mechanics of continuous media. S/U or letter grading.

  • 224. Introduction to Strong Interaction

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Evidence concerning strong interaction, particularly as exemplified in nucleon/nucleon and pion/nucleon systems. Isospin, scattering matrix, density matrix and polarization, properties of pions, one pion exchange potential, phase shift analysis. S/U or letter grading.

  • 225A. Advanced Nuclear Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B. Normally preceded by course 224. Advanced course in structure of complex nuclei, nuclear models, scattering and reactions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 225B. Advanced Nuclear Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B. Normally preceded by course 224. Advanced course in structure of complex nuclei, nuclear models, scattering and reactions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 226A. Elementary Particle Physics

    Units: 6

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B, 221C, 230A, 230B (230A, 230B may be taken concurrently). Modern theories of elementary particle physics beginning with symmetry principles and conserved quantities, classic V-A theory of weak interactions, gauge field theories (Abelian and non-Abelian), spontaneous symmetry breaking, SU(2) x U(1) electroweak interactions of leptons, quarks, Ws, Zo and y, quark theory of hadrons and quantum chromodynamics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 226B. Elementary Particle Physics

    Units: 6

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B, 221C, 230A, 230B (230A, 230B may be taken concurrently). Modern theories of elementary particle physics beginning with symmetry principles and conserved quantities, classic V-A theory of weak interactions, gauge field theories (Abelian and non-Abelian), spontaneous symmetry breaking, SU(2) x U(1) electroweak interactions of leptons, quarks, Ws, Zo and y, quark theory of hadrons and quantum chromodynamics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 226C. Elementary Particle Physics

    Units: 6

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B, 221C, 230A, 230B (230A, 230B may be taken concurrently). Modern theories of elementary particle physics beginning with symmetry principles and conserved quantities, classic V-A theory of weak interactions, gauge field theories (Abelian and non-Abelian), spontaneous symmetry breaking, SU(2) x U(1) electroweak interactions of leptons, quarks, Ws, Zo and y, quark theory of hadrons and quantum chromodynamics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 226D. Beyond the Standard Model

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 226A, 226B, 226C, 230A, 230B, 230C. Discussion of possible extensions of the current standard model of electroweak and strong interactions, including axions, technicolor, grand unified theories, supersymmetry, supergravity, and superstrings. S/U grading.

  • 226E. Particle Astrophysics: Exploring Earliest and Extreme Universe

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three and one half hours. Requisites: courses 210A, 210B, 221A, 221B. Recommended: course 226A. Introduction to high-energy astrophysics and discussion of latest developments in both experimentation and theory. Special emphasis on unified picture of universe that emerges from particle physics, astronomy, and cosmology. S/U or letter grading.

  • 230A. Quantum Field Theory

    Units: 6

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B, 221C. Modern quantum field theory, including free and interacting field quantization, operator and path integral formulation, renormalization theory and renormalization group methods, gauge theories, quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics, spontaneous symmetry breakdown, mass generation, and anomalies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 230B. Quantum Field Theory

    Units: 6

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B, 221C. Modern quantum field theory, including free and interacting field quantization, operator and path integral formulation, renormalization theory and renormalization group methods, gauge theories, quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics, spontaneous symmetry breakdown, mass generation, and anomalies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 230C. Quantum Field Theory

    Units: 6

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B, 221C. Modern quantum field theory, including free and interacting field quantization, operator and path integral formulation, renormalization theory and renormalization group methods, gauge theories, quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics, spontaneous symmetry breakdown, mass generation, and anomalies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 230D. Quantum Field Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B, 221C. Topics in modern quantum field theory, including solitons, instantons, and other topological defects, large N methods, finite temperature field theory, lattice field theory, effective field theory methods and chiral Lagrangians, conformal field theory, and topological aspects of anomalies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 231A. Methods of Mathematical Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for Mathematics 266A. Linear operators, review of functions of a complex variable, integral transforms, partial differential equations. S/U or letter grading.

  • 231B. Methods of Mathematical Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for Mathematics 266B. Ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, and integral equations. Calculus of variations. S/U or letter grading.

  • 231C. Methods of Mathematical Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for Mathematics 266C. Perturbation theory. Singular integral equations. Numerical methods. S/U or letter grading.

  • 232A. Relativity

    Units: 4

    Special and general theories, with applications to elementary particles and astrophysics.

  • 232B. Relativity

    Units: 4

    Special and general theories, with applications to elementary particles and astrophysics.

  • 232C. Special Topics in General Relativity

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 233. Introduction to High-Energy Astrophysics

    Units: 4

    Introductory lectures on modern high-energy astrophysics. High-energy radiation processes. Neutron stars. Pulsars. X-ray sources. Black holes. Supermassive rotators and quasars.

  • 235. Group Theory and Quantum Mechanics

    Units: 4

    Requisite: course 221A. Group representation theory and applications to quantum mechanics of atoms, molecules, and solids.

  • M236. Geometry and Physics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Mathematics M217.) Lecture, three hours. Interdisciplinary course on topics at interface between physics quantum fields and superstrings and mathematics of differential and algebraic geometry. Topics include supersymmetry, Seiberg/Witten theory, conformal field theory, Calabi/Yau manifolds, mirror symmetry and duality, integrable systems. S/U grading.

  • 237A. String Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 221A, 221B, 221C, 230A. Historical introduction to string theory, including classical bosonic string and its symmetries, light cone quantization, covariant quantization, conformal field theory, Polyakov path integral, tree level amplitudes, and loop amplitudes. S/U grading.

  • 237B. String Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 237A. Topics may include toroidal compactification, t-duality and d-branes, supersymmetric strings, orbitfolds, Calabi/Yau compactifications and physics in four dimensions, and strings at strong coupling and dualities. S/U or letter grading.

  • 241A. Solid-State Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 140A, 140B, 215A, 221C. Symmetry, free electrons, electrons in periodic potential, experimental measurement of band structure and Fermi surface parameters, cohesive energy, lattice vibrations, thermal properties. Letter grading.

  • 241B. Solid State Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 241A. Transport theory with applications, electron/electron interactions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 241C. Solid State Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 241B. Semiconductors, magnetism, phase transitions, superconductivity. S/U or letter grading.

  • 242A. Advanced Solid-State Theory

    Units: 4

    Requisites: courses 241A, 241B, 241C (may be taken concurrently). Many body methods in solid-state physics.

  • 242B. Advanced Solid-State Theory

    Units: 4

    Requisites: courses 241A, 241B, 241C (may be taken concurrently). Many body methods in solid-state physics.

  • 243A. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Disordered Systems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243B. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Magnetic Resonance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243C. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Quantum Criticality

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243D. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Magnetism

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243E. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Superconductivity

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243F. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Macromolecules

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243G. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Nanosystems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243H. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Optical Interactions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243I. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Nonlinear Optics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243J. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Topological Phases

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243K. Special Topics in Solid-State Physics: Low-Temperature Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • M243L. Condensed Matter Physics of Cells

    Units: 4

    (Same as Biomathematics M243.) Seminar, four hours. Designed for graduate students. Basic paradigms of condensed matter physics and applications to biophysical modeling. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243M. Statistical Mechanics of Living Systems from Active Matter to Immune System

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Exploration of how concepts and models from statistical physics can be used to gain quantitative and intuitive understanding of biological phenomena. Introduction to analytical and computational methods for describing stochastic complex systems, with application to problems in mechanics and dynamics of active matter and evolutionary dynamics of immune system. S/U or letter grading.

  • 243M. Statistical Mechanics of Living Systems from Active Matter to Immune System (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, four hours. Exploration of how concepts and models from statistical physics can be used to gain quantitative and intuitive understanding of biological phenomena. Introduction to analytical and computational methods for describing stochastic complex systems, with application to problems in mechanics and dynamics of active matter and evolutionary dynamics of immune system. S/U or letter grading.

  • 250. Introduction to Acceleration of Charged Particles

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 210A, 210B, 215A. Principles of charged-particle acceleration, including principles of synchrotrons and storage rings, beam parameter determination, statistical behavior of beams and beam cooling techniques, synchrotron light sources, colliding beam storage rings, medical accelerators, and free electron lasers.

  • 260. Seminar: Problems in Plasma Physics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 261. Seminar: Special Problems in Theoretical Physics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 262. Seminar: Physics of the Solid State

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 264. Seminar: Advanced Physical Acoustics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 266. Seminar: Propagation of Waves in Fluids

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 268. Seminar: Spectroscopy

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 269A. Seminar: Nuclear Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 269B. Seminar: Elementary Particle Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • 269C. Seminar: Accelerator Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, three hours. Physics principles governing design and performance analysis of particle accelerators, using existing accelerators as examples and emphasizing interplay among design goals, component performance, and operational experience. S/U grading.

  • 269D. Strobe Seminar Series: Frontiers in Imaging and Microscopy

    Units: 2

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion with leading figures of frontiers of imaging and microscopy fields, including multi-dimensional electron microscopy at atomic resolution, real-time functional three-dimensional X-ray imaging of advanced materials, advanced optical nano-imaging, and integrative approaches and underpinning technologies for different imaging modalities. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U grading.

  • 280E. Advanced Plasma Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Requisites: courses M122, 180E. Laboratory experiments on behavior of plasmas in magnetic fields. Study of basic physics of particle motions, distribution functions, and fluid dynamics. Plasma waves and nonlinear phenomena. Advanced probe, microwave and plasma diagnostics.

  • C285. Foundations of Physics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Historical development and philosophical sources of classical and modern physics. Concurrently scheduled with course C185. Letter grading.

  • C286. Neurophysics: Brain-Mind Problem

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered CM286.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL, 6A, 6B, 6C, Chemistry 14A or 20A, Mathematics 3A, 3B, 3C, 31A, 32A, 32B, 33A. How does mind emerge from brain? Provides summary of basic biophysics of neurons, synapses, and plasticity. Introduction to commonly used experimental and theoretical techniques of measuring, quantifying, and modeling neural activity, and their relative strengths and weakness and use of them to understand link between neural circuits, their emergent neural dynamics, and behavior in example model systems. Discussion of mechanisms of interaction between neural circuits and their role in cognition, learning, and sleep. Computer laboratory component where students learn to write simple codes to quantify neural activity patterns. Concurrently scheduled with course C186. S/U or letter grading.

  • C286. Neurophysics: Brain-Mind Problem (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered CM286.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 1A, 1B, and 1C, or 5A, 5B, and 5C, or 6A, 6B, and 6C, Chemistry 14A or 20A, Mathematics 3A, 3B, 3C, 33A. How does mind emerge from brain? Provides summary of basic biophysics of neurons, synapses, and plasticity. Introduction to commonly used experimental and theoretical techniques of measuring, quantifying, and modeling neural activity, and their relative strengths and weakness and use of them to understand link between neural circuits, their emergent neural dynamics, and behavior in example model systems. Discussion of mechanisms of interaction between neural circuits and their role in cognition, learning, and sleep. Computer laboratory component where students learn to write simple codes to quantify neural activity patterns. Concurrently scheduled with course C186. S/U or letter grading.

  • C287A. Biological Physics I: Life at Rest

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 105A, 110A, 115A, Chemistry 110A, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology 100 (or M140 or 165A). Equilibrium phenomena. Application of basic mechanics, optics, and thermodynamics to biological design: structure of skeleton, scaling of bone and muscle mass, swim bladders, and animal vision. Application of elementary statistical physics, electrostatics, and elasticity to structure of proteins, DNA, and biomembranes. Concurrently scheduled with course C187A. S/U or letter grading.

  • C287B. Biological Physics II: Life in Motion

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 105A, 110A, 115A, C287A, Chemistry 110A, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology 100. Nonequilibrium phenomena. Application of mechanics, hydrodynamics, diffusion, and electrical transport to dynamical phenomena. Macroscopic phenomena: swimming, flying, thermoregulation, blood circulation, breathing, electrical transport along membranes. Physics of cells: Brownian motion, molecular motors, and cytoskeleton. Concurrently scheduled with course C187B. S/U or letter grading.

  • 290. Research Tutorial: Plasma Physics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Three terms required of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion by staff and students directed toward problems of current research interest in plasma physics group, both experimental and theoretical. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 291. Research Tutorial: Elementary Particle Theory

    Units: 2 or 4

    Requisites: courses 226A, 230A, 230B. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion by staff, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 292. Research Tutorial: Spectroscopy, Low-Temperature, and Solid-State Physics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Required of each graduate student doing research in these fields, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion by staff and students on problems of current research interest in spectroscopy, low-temperature, and solid-state physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 293. Research Tutorial: Current Topics in Physics

    Units: 2

    Lecture, one hour. Seminar and discussion by staff and students on current topics in physics, both experimental and theoretical (topics not limited to one field of physics). Strongly recommended for graduate students in physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 294. Research Tutorial: Accelerator Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Lecture, one hour; discussion, two hours. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field. Seminar and discussion by faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students on topics of current interest in accelerator physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295. Research Tutorial: Soft Matter/Biological Physics

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, one hour. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field. One-hour presentation by students either on their ongoing research or on agreed on topic. Students answer critical questions and participate in critical examination of research. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 296. Research Topics in Physics

    Units: 2

    Advanced study and analysis of current topics in physics. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • M297. Research Tutorial: Astroparticle Physics

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Same as Astronomy M297.) Lecture, one hour; discussion, two hours. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field. Seminar and discussion by faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students on topics of current interest in astroparticle physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 298. Research Tutorial: Experimental Elementary Particle Physics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Limited to six students. Required of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion by staff and students on current problems in experimental elementary particle physics. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 299. Research Tutorial: Nuclear Physics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Required of each graduate student doing research in this field, ordinarily during second or third year. Seminar and discussion on nuclear physics by staff and students, in both experiment and theory. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • M370A. Integrated Science Instruction Methods

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemistry M370A and Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M370A.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: one introductory lower division year (including laboratory) each of chemistry, life sciences, and physics and at least two Earth science courses, preferably one with field experience. Classroom management, lesson design, assessment, history of science education. S/U or letter grading.

  • M370B. Integrated Science Instruction Methods

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemistry M370B and Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M370B.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Requisite: course M370A or Chemistry M370A or Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M370A. Application of learning theory to science instruction and classroom management, including use of technology, collaborative learning, laboratory safety, ethical issues, field experiences, and professional development. S/U or letter grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 490. Scientific Writing

    Units: 2

    Seminar, 90 minutes. Practical guidelines for improved scientific writing and oral presentation. Writing of several short papers with subsequent analysis in class. Short blackboard and/or viewgraph presentations. Topics vary. S/U grading.

  • 495. Teaching College Physics

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; multi-day intensive training at beginning of Fall Quarter. Required of all new teaching assistants. Special course for teaching assistants designed as an introduction to teaching college physics, with emphasis on applying discussed techniques in classroom. Ideas and skills learned are evaluated in the sections of each teaching assistant. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual Studies

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 597. Preparation for Master's Comprehensive Examination or Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U grading.

  • 598. Master's Thesis Research and Writing

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated twice for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 599. Ph.D. Research and Writing

    Units: 4 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for maximum of 18 units. S/U grading.