• 1A. Principles of Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open to freshmen. Introduction to financial accounting principles, including preparation and analysis of financial transactions and financial statements. Valuation and recording of asset-related transactions, including cash, receivables, marketable securities, inventories, and long-lived assets. Current liabilities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 1B. Principles of Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 1A. Not open to freshmen. Completion of balance sheet with emphasis on debt and equity, including in-depth introduction to time value of money concepts. Introduction to partnership and individual income tax accounting. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 88. Lower Division Seminar: Special Topics in Management

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Variable topics seminar that examines specific issues or problems and ways that professionals in management approach study of them. Students define, prepare, and present their own research projects with guidance of professional school faculty member. Letter grading.

  • 88S. Mad Over Marketing: Why We Buy What We Buy

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Study of world of marketing with holistic approach, combining creative, strategic, and psychological elements of marketing. Examination of different marketing campaigns across variety of brands and media channels such as TV, social media, print, out-of-home, Guerilla, etc. P/NP grading. Facilitated by Shashvat Somany, with Dominique M. Hanssens as faculty mentor.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors and departmental honors programs. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 108. Business Law

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Not open to freshmen. Essentials of contracts, agency, partnerships, corporations, and other select areas of law in a business environment. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 109. International Business Law

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 108. Study of international business legal environment, including general overview of international laws and organizations and comprehensive review of U.S. regulations of international business transactions. Special emphasis on international litigation, commercial transactions, regulation of investments, multinational corporations, and international banking. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120A. Intermediate Financial Accounting I

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 1B. Intermediate-level course in theory and practice of financial accounting. Underlying concepts of asset valuation and income measurement. Measurement and reporting of current and long-term assets, including cash and marketable securities, inventories, plant assets and depreciation, and intangibles. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120B. Intermediate Financial Accounting II

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 120A. Intermediate-level course in theory and practice of financial accounting. Underlying concepts of liability recognition and expense, including leases, bonds, and pensions. Shareholder's equity, including earnings per share. Accounting for changing prices. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 121. Ethical Leadership in Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, seven and one half hours. Not open to freshmen. Review of range of ethical considerations in business decisions involving individuals, corporations, society, and international business. Analysis of cases for presentation and discussion. What is ethical dilemma posed? What is range of possible decisions and band of ethical choices supporting them? Offered in summer only. Letter grading.

  • 122. Management Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 1B, one statistics course. Nature, objectives, and procedures of cost accounting and control; job costing and process costing; accounting for manufacturing overhead; cost budgeting; cost reports; joint-product costing; distribution cost; standard costs; differential cost analysis; profit-volume relationships and break-even analysis. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 123. Auditing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 120B. Comprehensive study of procedures used in verification of financial statements and related information, including ethical, legal, and other professional issues. Auditing of a complete set of financial statements. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124. Advanced Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 120B. Specialized accounting topics in business combinations, consolidated financial statements, branch accounting, leveraged buyouts, Securities and Exchange Commission, foreign currency transactions, translation of foreign financial statements, partnership ownership changes and liquidations, governmental accounting, and bankruptcy. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 126. Financial Statement Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 120B. Comprehensive study of concepts and procedures used to interpret and analyze balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Calculation and interpretation of financial ratios and credit analysis. Valuation theory using both discounted cash flows and residual income model. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 127A. Tax Principles and Policy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 1B. Study of fundamental income tax problems encountered by individuals and other entities in analyzing business, investment, employment, and personal decisions. Special emphasis on role of tax rules in capital transactions and decision making. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 127B. Corporate and Partnership Taxation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 1B. Recommended: course 127A. Study of tax issues arising in formation, operation, and termination of corporations and partnerships. Special emphasis on closely held enterprises, including S corporations. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 127C. International Taxation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 127A. Study of two principle areas of international taxation from U.S. regulatory perspective: taxation of American citizens and companies conducting business in international arena (outbound transactions) and taxation of foreign nationals and companies who invest or conduct business in the U.S. (inbound transactions). P/NP or letter grading.

  • 128. Special Topics in Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 120B. Selected topics in public accounting, such as audit and fraud examination, mergers and acquisitions, public-company status and going-public process, role of partner, serving entrepreneurial clients, and fund accounting. Discussion of case study of current interest in accounting profession. Business plan preparation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 130A. Basic Managerial Finance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 1B, one statistics course. Study of financial decision making by business firms, with emphasis on applications of economic and accounting principles in financial analysis, planning, and control. Extensive use of problems and cases to illustrate varied analytical techniques employed in decision making. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 140. Elements of Production and Operations Research

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: Mathematics 3A, 3B, 3C. Principles and decision analysis related to effective utilization of factors of production in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing activities. Analytical models and methods for allocation, transportation, inventories, replacement, scheduling, and facilities design. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 142A. Information Technology in Accounting

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 142.) Lecture, seven and one half hours. Not open to freshmen. Introduction to role and use of models and modeling in managerial decision making, with focus on important types of models, their formulation and application, and insight and information that may be gained from use of modeling. Enables managers to understand role of quantitative models in firms that are most often applicable in business planning and decision making. Discussion of applications in area of accounting, finance, marketing, and operations, with emphasis on model formulation, interpretation of solutions, and understanding of mathematical versus verbal explanation of situations. Use of solution techniques and computer to solve problems. Offered in summer only. Letter grading.

  • 142B. Communication Technology, Programming, and Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, six hours. Preparation: intermediate Excel user. Requisite: course 142A (or former 142). Not open to freshmen. Hands-on experience in accounting uses of Microsoft Excel. Topics include creating data boxes in financial accounting, using multiple sheets with Excel formulas, preparing professional quality financial reports, creating graphs to interpret business results, and using Excel functions to evaluate accounting data. Exploration of utility of QuicBooks and functionality for small businesses. Offered in summer only. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 160. Entrepreneurship and Venture Initiation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to key concepts of entrepreneurship, including new product development, finance, business plan development, and technology commercialization. Basic tools and personal characteristics required for entrepreneurship. Terminology used by lawyers, accountants, venture capitalists, and other investors when forming and financing new companies to be developed as startups, spinouts from existing company, or acquisitions of existing company (or its assets). Assessment of feasibility of business concept and communication of concept to potential investors, employees, and business partners. Discussion of technology feasibility, intellectual property, and licensing. Letter grading.

  • 161. Business Plan Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 160. Fundamentals of developing effective business plans, both in presentation and written form. Basic principles of designing and articulating plans for sales, marketing, product or service, operations, financials, management, and staffing functions of new startup businesses. How to develop well-written investment-quality business plans and business plan presentations, understand various analytical processes required to produce such plans, improve student writing and oral presentation skills, and formally present their business plans to audience of angel and venture capital investors. Letter grading.

  • 162. Entrepreneurship and Technology Commercialization

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to transformation of new knowledge and inventions into viable commercial products and services, with particular emphasis on technology being developed at major research universities like UCLA. Initial emphasis on assessment and protection of intellectual property and early evaluation of technologies to determine potential for commercialization. How intellectual property in its various forms is protected and how rights to these assets are negotiated by parties involved. Examination of nature of contracts and negotiation between university technology transfer offices, researchers, technical experts, and early investors in commercialization space that might lead to patents, licenses, or new business development. Letter grading.

  • 163. Entrepreneurship and New Product Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to new product innovation and management. Students assume role of product managers in identifying, developing, and commercializing new products through cases, businesses currently in news, team project, and readings to develop critical thinking, decision-making skills, and creativity in launch of successful new product (team project). Letter grading.

  • 164. Entrepreneurial Finance and Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to fundamental concepts of financial management of early-stage companies, with particular emphasis on capital formation of new ventures. Relationship between entrepreneurs and investors and discussion of different goals of founders and investors, including nature of negotiation and relationship between parties over time. Letter grading.

  • 165. Marketing Principles for Entrepreneurs

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Study and application of analytic frameworks to assess market opportunities and implement marketing strategies for entrepreneurial firms. Letter grading.

  • 167. Social Entrepreneurship

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of fundamental challenges and opportunities of developing and managing enterprises with social missions. Use of framework to develop strategic implementation plan that incorporates external analysis, organizational assessment, strategy development, and executable action steps and draws on expertise and experience of faculty members and alumni as well as experts in fields of social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management, and strategic philanthropy who present select topics of interest. Letter grading.

  • 180. Special Topics in Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Topics of special interest to undergraduate students. Specific subjects may vary each term depending on particular interest of instructors or students. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 182. Leadership Principles and Practice

    Units: 4

    Lecture, six hours. Proven methods for motivating, and inspiring best performance, persuading, and influencing others; leading high-performance teams; creativity and innovation; decision-making, and negotiating skills, both one-on-one and in groups. Organizational examples, simulations, and in-class exercises. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors and departmental honors programs. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 195. Community or Corporate Internships in Management

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship in supervised setting in community agency or business. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports of their experience. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research in Management

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation of selected research topic under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 201A. Business Forecasting: Turning Numbers into Knowledge

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Preparation: familiarity with linear regression. Examination of one approach to analytical thinking -- forcing numerical and textual data into carefully formulated alternative models. Data studied include macroeconomic variables (growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, and exchange rates), industry data, and firm data. Letter grading.

  • 201B. Econometrics and Business Forecasting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Development of standard topics in applied econometric modeling. Emphasis on assumptions underlying classical normal linear regression model, special problems in application, and interpretation of results. Practical applications extensively developed in student projects.

  • 202B. Economic Consulting and Applied Managerial Economics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 402, 405. Use of economic methods to analyze issues of intellectual property, environmental damage, trademark infringement, brand value, and consumer demand. Focus on econometric thinking and problem solving using case studies as basis for lectures and homework. S/U or letter grading.

  • 205A. International Business Economics

    Units: 4

    Requisite: course 405. International business environment, international economic institutions, national and regional trade policies and developments, trends in foreign markets, and international monetary problems, studied for their influence on organization and operation of the international corporation.

  • 209. Managing Complex Business Deals

    Units: 4 or 6

    (Formerly numbered M209.) Lecture, three hours. Preparation: familiarity with basic vocabulary and concepts, including basic principles of accounting and valuation. Advanced course in business organization. Examination of structure of business transactions and allocation of control, risk, and return. Topics include venture capital investments, debt and loan agreements, employment agreements, distribution and marketing agreements (including franchising), motion picture production/finance/distribution agreements, and joint ventures. Assigned reading and focus on documents that incorporate terms of business transactions of deals. Concurrently scheduled with Law 239. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209A. Managing Complex Business Deals

    Units: 3 or 4

    (Formerly numbered M209A.) Lecture, three hours. Preparation: familiarity with basic vocabulary and concepts, including basic principles of accounting and valuation. Course 209A is enforced requisite to 209B. Advanced course in business organization. Examination of structure of business transactions and allocation of control, risk, and return. Topics include venture capital investments, debt and loan agreements, employment agreements, distribution and marketing agreements (including franchising), motion picture production/finance/distribution agreements, and joint ventures. Assigned reading and focus on documents that incorporate terms of business transactions of deals. Concurrently schedule with Law 239. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 209B).

  • 209B. Managing Complex Business Deals

    Units: 1 or 2

    Lecture, three hours. Preparation: familiarity with basic vocabulary and concepts, including basic principles of accounting and valuation. Enforced requisite: course 209A. Continuation of course 209A. Advanced course in business organization. Examination of structure of business transactions and allocation of control, risk, and return. Topics include venture capital investments, debt and loan agreements, employment agreements, distribution and marketing agreements (including franchising), motion picture production/finance/distribution agreements, and joint ventures. Assigned reading and focus on documents that incorporate terms of business transactions of deals. Concurrently schedule with Law 239. S/U or letter grading.

  • 214. Managerial Decision Making

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to principles of rational judgment and choice, common behavioral biases of managers and consumers, and corrective tools and procedures, drawing heavily on disciplines of psychology and behavioral economics. Topics include decision structuring, chance processes, forecasting, confidence, likelihood judgment, risk perception and risk-taking, decision under uncertainty, multiattribute choice, framing and mental accounting, intertemporal choice, allocation decisions, organizational decision making, choice architecture, happiness, and well-being. S/U or letter grading.

  • 215A. Negotiations Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Series of negotiation exercises to foster development of students' negotiation skills and experience. Use of economic and game-theoretic concepts in debrief to gain insight and develop framework for finding broad negotiation principles applicable. S/U or letter grading.

  • 215B. Market Entry Strategy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 420. Analysis of strategic issues encountered by entrepreneurial and established companies in entering new markets. Emphasis on idea generation, timing, industry evolution, entry modes, optimal growth, and competitive interaction. S/U or letter grading.

  • 217A. Decision Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 402. Managerial decision making occurs in presence of uncertainty which can be about events over which no individual has any control or it can be about what other individuals will do. Framework provided for structuring and analyzing such decisions, with application of framework to such scenarios as product development, litigation, business of treasure hunting, and bidding. S/U or letter grading.

  • 220. Corporate Financial Reporting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 403. In-depth treatment of significant corporate financial reporting issues to enhance understanding of financial statements and student ability to interpret and use information contained in these disclosures. Emphasis on economic substance of transactions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 222. Corporate Decision Making and Incentives

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 403. Use of basic microeconomics to answer what information is needed to make managerial decisions, what incentives are needed to motivate managers, and how information should be recorded to facilitate both. Essential for careers in consulting, private equity, and general management. S/U or letter grading.

  • 223. Behavioral Economics in Digital World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Consideration of how heuristics and biases influence consumer decision making and how businesses can help people make better personal finance decisions with innovative digital technologies. Letter grading.

  • 224. Business Law for Managers and Entrepreneurs

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introductory course that uses practical approach to teach students to recognize, understand, and manage legal issues. Topics include contract law, litigation process and alternatives, intellectual property law, business formation, corporate law, employment law, collateralized lending, and bankruptcy reorganizations. How to deal with potential legal issues before they become serious problems. S/U or letter grading.

  • M225. Law and Management of Nonprofit Organizations

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M229.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to important legal, financial, and management issues confronting nonprofit organizations. Topics include how to start nonprofit tax-exempt organizations, qualifying and maintaining tax-exempt status under IRC Code Section 501(c)(3), corporate governance, political and legislative activity restrictions, and strategic planning, fundraising, nonprofit accounting, and employment law. S/U or letter grading.

  • 226. Special Advanced Topics in Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 403. Examination of advanced topics in accounting that arise in business combinations and international accounting practices, including principles underlying consolidated financial statements, treatment of unconsolidated subsidiaries and affiliate investments, translation of foreign exchange, and valuation of derivatives for hedging exchange risk. S/U or letter grading.

  • 227. Taxation and Management Decisions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 403. Examination of impact of taxes on decisions of businesses and investors. Effects of taxes on investment decisions, mergers and acquisitions, capital structure, dividend policies, and employee compensation. S/U or letter grading.

  • 228. Financial Reporting and Equity Valuation

    Units: 4

    Lecture and cases, three hours. Requisite: course 403. Focus principally on equity valuation from financial accounting data, with emphasis on construction of proforma financial statements and application of discounted cash flow and residual income valuation approaches. Consideration of complications posed by capital structure, recapitalizations, derivative securities, intercorporate investments, abandonment options, accounting restatements, and equity trading. Use of multiples in valuation and pricing anomalies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 231C. Corporate Valuation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 408, 430. Lectures, discussions, and student presentations. Issues and analytical tools relevant for valuing projects, divisions, and corporations. Theories of discounted cash flow valuation (DCF) and relative valuation using market multiples. Theories of practice to value different projects, including IPO, mergers and acquisitions, divestitures, and private firms. Exploration of how real options affect investment decisions and how they can be identified and valued. Letter grading.

  • 231D. Takeovers, Restructuring, and Corporate Governance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 230 (or 430), 408. Process by which corporate control transactions take place; role of market for corporate control in leading to economic restructuring and shifts in resource allocation by corporations. Empirical evidence on economic and capital market reactions to control transactions and to defensive measures by management. Focus on interaction of strategic planning, firm value maximization, and investment decisions in life cycle of growth of firm. S/U or letter grading.

  • 231E. Managing Finance and Financing Emerging Enterprises

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 230 (or 430), 403, 408. Designed for second-year graduate students. Emphasis on financial, control, and investment issues confronting rapidly growing companies in entrepreneurial settings. Consideration and selection of financing vehicles that may be appropriate to securing organizations' money requirements. S/U or letter grading.

  • 232A. Investment Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 230 (or 430), 408. Topics include application of portfolio theory to investment decisions, performance evaluation, and basics of portfolio management strategies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 232B. Fixed-Income Markets

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Preparation: demonstrable training in statistics. Requisite: course 408. Introduction to fixed-income markets: institutional arrangements in primary and secondary markets; description and analysis of various types of fixed-income instruments; valuation; fixed-income portfolio management; use of derivative instruments and dynamic investment strategies; asset securitization. S/U or letter grading.

  • 232D. Option Markets

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 408. Organization and role of organized derivative markets, including listed and OTC options and futures: arbitrage and hedging relationships, valuation of derivative trading strategies, and innovations in derivative markets. Students learn fundamentals of hedging and spreading by playing option trading game and writing term paper analyzing their strategies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 232E. Market and Credit Risk Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 408, 430. Discussion of regulatory environment for both market and credit risk management, data necessary to manage these risks, types of models used for risk management, types of securities and techniques for hedging market and credit risks, performance measurement of risk management systems, and other types of risks that affect risk management, such as operation risk, liquidity risk, commodity risk, weather risk, and model risk. Letter grading.

  • 232F. Behavioral Finance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 408. Introduction to and explanation of evidence of anomalous return behavior found in U.S. equities markets. Presentation of some paradigms of stock price movements that are rooted in studies from psychology and explanation of trading activity in equity risk-return paradigm. Introduction to some psychological biases that researchers suspect are inherent to investors. Employment of some results from psychology literature to explain irrationalities encountered in finance literature. Presentation of latest evidence on why individual investors trade and how individual and institutional investors form their portfolios. Letter grading.

  • 234A. International Financial Markets

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 408. Conceptual understanding of foreign exchange market, Eurocurrency market, international bond market, and equity markets in various countries. Emphasis on underlying economic principles, although where relevant, institutional features helpful in understanding structure and operations of markets to be dealt with in detail. S/U or letter grading.

  • 235. Venture Capital and Private Equity

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 408, 430. Use of cases to study entrepreneurial finance and venture capital. Analysis of issues faced by entrepreneurs who are setting up new firms, as well as decisions of private equity partnership managers and investors. How transactions are structured and why investors and entrepreneurs choose certain contractual arrangements. Development of understanding for institutional context of private equity finance. Time also devoted to leveraged buyouts. S/U or letter grading.

  • 238. Special Topics in Finance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 230 (or 430), 408. Selected topics in finance theory, empirical studies, and financial policy. May be repeated for credit with instructor change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240E. Managing Entrepreneurial Operations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 410. Designed for second-year graduate students. Exploration of operating issues involved in managing entrepreneurial enterprises. Integrative course, building on methodologies, principles, and concepts provided in requisite functional and strategic core courses. Use of extensive readings and case studies to develop skills and philosophical basis for applying managerial concepts to entrepreneurial operations. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240F. Global Supply Chain Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 410. Business environment today is characterized by globalized operations, intense competition, rapid technological change, and short product life cycles. Consequently, firms can no longer afford to operate in isolation. In many industries competition has moved from firm level to supply chain level. Provides understanding of strategic, tactical, and operational issues in supply chain management, with generous attention to emerging digital economy. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240G. Global Operations Strategy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 410. Study of challenges of operating globally in range of industries, including software, consulting, automotive, and textile. Several opportunities for hands-on quantitative methods, with strategic perspective throughout. S/U or letter grading.

  • 241A. Technology Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 410, 411. Management of high-technology firm, including acquisition, creation, and utilization of technology and knowledge assets. Research and product development, product and process technologies, technology regimes, high-technology markets, competition, and technology strategies. Case examples from sectors such as computing, telecommunications, e-business, medical devices, nanotechnology, advanced transportation systems, and electronics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 246A. Business and Environment

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Overview of many ways in which environmental issues interact with main functional areas of business: finance, marketing, strategy, operations, accounting. Basic introduction to background of environmental issues, with focus primarily on business aspects. Specific topics vary from year to year, but course details what every manager should know about environmental issues in business. S/U or letter grading.

  • M247. Intellectual Property for Technology Entrepreneurs and Managers

    Units: 2

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M293.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Introduction to intellectual property (IP) in context of technology products and markets. Topics include best practices to put in place before product development starts, how to develop high-value patent portfolios, patent licensing, offensive and defensive IP litigation considerations, trade secrets, opportunities and pitfalls of open source software, trademarks, managing copyright in increasingly complex content ecosystems, and adopting IP strategies to globalized marketplaces. Includes case studies inspired by complex IP questions facing technology companies today. S/U or letter grading.

  • 250D. Patterns of Problem Solving

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Acquisition of strategies that enhance adaptive planning and real-time judgment, based on findings from brain studies and cognitive research. Design of tools to respond to emergent uncertainties and to address situations where intense pressures of time and cost are present. Letter grading.

  • 252. Persuasion and Influence

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 409. Designed for individuals interested in improving their ability to persuade and influence others. Consideration of number of well-studied persuasion and influence strategies that result in greater buy-in for one's ideas, initiatives, proposals, products, and requests. Letter grading.

  • 254. Incentives and Motivation in Organizations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Course 254 is open to MBA, EMBA, and FEMBA students. Focus on strategic management of human resources to create value by directly motivating behavior consistent with goals and policies of firm. Motivating effects of different forms of monetary and non-monetary incentives in different types of organizations and for different types of employees and executives. Analysis of cases and interaction with experts in human resource management and compensation practices to develop skills needed to design and implement optimal reward systems for organizations. S/U or letter grading.

  • 256. Leadership and Ethics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Series of real-life business situations that pose complex problems of leadership and ethics, so students develop better understanding of how they can successfully address business situations that define their leadership and ethical positions. Letter grading.

  • 260A. Customer Assessment and Analytics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 411. Decision-oriented course concerned with marketing research and data-driven marketing analytics. Detailed hands-on understanding of market research methodologies used in strategic assessment of customer perceptions and preferences. Extensive use of case studies. Letter grading.

  • 260B. Marketing Strategy and Planning

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Development of framework for strategic marketing planning based on customer behavior, market segmentation, product positioning, product life cycle, market responsiveness, and competitive reaction. Within this framework, development of key elements in annual marketing process. Letter grading.

  • 261A. Sales and Channel Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Study of problems in management of sales and distribution channels. Issues of personal selling, account management, determining sales force size, organization, and compensation plans. Coverage of channel selection, conflict, power, and control. Extensive use of case studies. Letter grading.

  • 261B. Global Marketing Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Analysis of opportunities, distinctive characteristics, and emerging trends in foreign markets, including exploration of alternative methods and strategies for entering foreign markets; organizational planning and control; impact of social, cultural, economic, and political differences; and problems of adapting American marketing concepts and methods. Letter grading.

  • 262. Price Policies

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 405, 411. Consideration of environment of pricing decision -- costs, customer, channels, competition, and regulation. Analysis of when and how to apply specific pricing strategies, including two-part tariffs, quantity discounts, product differentiation, bundling, and auctions. Letter grading.

  • 263A. Consumer Behavior

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Study of nature and determinants of consumer behavior. Emphasis on influence of sociopsychological factors such as personality, small groups, demographic variables, social class, and culture on formation of consumers' attitudes, consumption, and purchasing behavior. S/U or letter grading.

  • 264A. Market Research

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Designed for prospective users of research results rather than for specialists in research. Marketing research is aid to management decision making. Development of problem-analysis skills, providing knowledge of concepts and methods of marketing research, with increased sensitivity to limitations of marketing data. Letter grading.

  • 264B. Data Analytics for Marketing and Finance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 402. How to fit predictive models and visualize multivariate data using examples and topics from marketing and finance. Topics include conditional prediction and predictive models, advanced treatment of regression, visualization and graphics, automating analysis for high dimensional data. Use of industry-leading R/Rstudio statistical environment. S/U or letter grading.

  • 265. Brand Management

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 265A.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Introduction to considerations in development, implementation, and management of brands. Discussion of challenges to creating and maintaining strong brands. Topics include building brand knowledge and identities, marketing mix and brands, brand architectures, and brand equity. Letter grading.

  • 266A. New Product Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Examination of new product development (NPD) process with objective of learning key tools and methods and applying them to case studies, exercises, and course project. Products viewed through three lenses: quantifiable rational attributes, appeal due to emotional characteristics, and cost/technology/competitive tradeoffs. NPD process also investigated through five key phases: ideation, concept generation and selection, detailed design, prototyping and testing, and ramp-up and product launch. Coverage of mass customization, parallel prototyping, cost reduction, and creativity. Letter grading.

  • 266B. Advertising and Marketing Communications

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Detailed study of decisions regarding media and forms of advertising and marketing communications to develop integrated strategies. Review of use and effectiveness of advertising and communication tools. Evaluation of advertising and promotional policies from development through implementation. Letter grading.

  • 267. Digital One-to-One Marketing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 402, 411. Use of notion of customer life cycle as organizing principle and application to digital one-to-one marketing context. Frameworks and analytical tools for interacting with customers and learning about their preferences as they evolve through four stages of customer life cycle: (1) customer acquisition, (2) initial post-promotion purchasing, (3) mid-maturity purchase and transaction behavior, and (4) customer attrition or switchover to other product lines. S/U or letter grading.

  • 268. Selected Topics in Marketing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 411. Study of selected areas of marketing knowledge and thought. Specific subjects vary each term depending on particular interests of instructor and students. Individual projects and reports. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 270C. Web Business

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Doing business on Web. Web infrastructure and ecology. Web business models and strategies. Web business development, operation, and marketing. New frontiers, such as Web services, social networking, and semantic Web. S/U or letter grading.

  • M271A. Medtech Innovation I: Entrepreneurial Opportunities in Medical Technology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Bioengineering M233A.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Designed for graduate and professional students in engineering, dentistry, design, law, management, and medicine. Focus on understanding how to identify unmet clinical needs, properly filtering through these needs using various acceptance criteria, and selecting promising needs for which potential medtech solutions are explored. Students work in groups to expedite traditional research and development processes to invent and implement new medtech devices that increase quality of clinical care and result in improved patient outcomes in hospital system. Introduction to intellectual property basics and various medtech business models. Letter grading.

  • M271B. Medtech Innovation II: Prototyping and New Venture Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Bioengineering M233B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, three hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisite: course M271A. Designed for graduate and professional students in engineering, dentistry, design, law, management, and medicine. Development of medtech solutions for unmet clinical needs previously identified in course M271A. Steps necessary to commercialize viable medtech solutions. Exploration of concept selection, business plan development, intellectual property filing, financing strategies, and device prototyping. Letter grading.

  • 272A. Information Systems Project Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Methods and tools for project management in information systems (IS) context. Initiating, planning, executing, controlling, reporting, and closing projects. Project integration, scope, time, cost, quality control, and risk management. Sourcing and external procurement. Contracting and managing partner relationships. Change management. S/U or letter grading.

  • 273. Current Topics in Entertainment, Media, and Sports

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Designed for graduate students. Examination in depth of current issues in entertainment, media, and sports. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 275. Current Topics in Emerging Technologies and Markets

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Designed for graduate students. Examination in depth of current emerging technologies and related market developments. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M277. Real Estate Finance Law

    Units: 1 to 8

    (Same as Law M209.) Lecture, three hours. Concentrated study of law governing financing of land transactions from both national and California perspectives. Topics include California deed of trust, installment land contracts and other mortgaging substitutes, assignments of rents, receiverships, prepayment, foreclosure, priorities, California antideficiency legislation, impact of borrower bankruptcy on mortgage lenders, construction lending, future advances lending, and secondary market. S/U or letter grading.

  • 277A. Real Estate Finance Law

    Units: 3 or 4

    (Formerly numbered M277A.) Lecture, three hours. Course 277A is enforced requisite to 277B. Concentrated study of law governing financing of land transactions from both national and California perspectives. Topics include California deed of trust, installment land contracts and other mortgaging substitutes, assignments of rents, receiverships, prepayment, foreclosure, priorities, California antideficiency legislation, impact of borrower bankruptcy on mortgage lenders, construction lending, future advances lending, and secondary market. Concurrently scheduled with Law 209. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 277B).

  • 277B. Real Estate Finance Law

    Units: 1 or 2

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 277A. Continuation of course 277A. Concentrated study of law governing financing of land transactions from both national and California perspectives. Topics include California deed of trust, installment land contracts and other mortgaging substitutes, assignments of rents, receiverships, prepayment, foreclosure, priorities, California antideficiency legislation, impact of borrower bankruptcy on mortgage lenders, construction lending, future advances lending, and secondary market. Concurrently scheduled with Law 209. S/U or letter grading.

  • 278A. Urban Real Estate Financing and Investing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 408, 430. Investor-oriented course in which real estate and business trends are evaluated to determine alternative real estate investment opportunities. Use of current financial, economic, and investment theories and techniques to real estate investment opportunities in case studies and short case problems to illustrate development of investment strategies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 279A. Cases in Real Estate Investments

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 408, 430. Development of understanding of principal issues involved with real estate investment and finance. Topics include real estate financial analysis and valuation in variety of contexts (single and multifamily residential, commercial/industrial, shopping center, and hotel properties), real estate taxation, real estate law, development process, securitization, REITs, and leasing and workout of troubled properties. S/U or letter grading.

  • 279B. Entrepreneurial Real Estate Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 278A (or 279A), 408, 430. Introduction to various aspects of real estate development from perspectives of entrepreneur and investor. Coverage of all types of developments, including single family, multifamily, hotel, office, retail, and industrial. Industry guest speakers to help reinforce principles taught. Real estate development simulation and group presentations to panel of investors included. S/U or letter grading.

  • 279C. Real Estate Economics, Capital Markets, and Securitization

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Exploration of linkages between real estate, macroeconomy, and capital markets. New insights as to structure and practice of macroeconomic regulation, crisis policy formulation, and related capital markets and real estate outcomes. Letter grading.

  • 281B. People in Organizations

    Units: 4

    Designed for graduate students. Introduction to different philosophical perspectives for understanding human behavior. Theories and concepts important for understanding human behavior in organizations, as well as managerial implications of individual, group, and social behavior. Special attention to knowledge about satisfaction, motivation, and productivity in organizations.

  • 282. Optimizing Team Performance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 409, 414A. Optimization of team performance by diagnosing complex team dynamics and taking appropriate action to improve team functioning to help students strengthen their teamwork skills in ways that are proven to increase effectiveness and performance of teams. Letter grading.

  • 284C. Managing Entrepreneurial Organizations

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Issues involved in developing and managing entrepreneurial organizations. Topics include organizational growth, managerial tools, strategic planning, organizational design, management development, control systems, leadership, and cultural management. Examination of transitions that individuals must make as organizations grow. S/U or letter grading.

  • 285A. Leadership, Motivation, and Power

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Theoretical and practical approaches to influencing and motivating people. Relative effectiveness of various leadership styles, different motivation theories, and power tactics from managerial point of view. Use of experience-based learning methods to aid diagnosis and understanding of one's own influence styles. S/U or letter grading.

  • 285B. Managerial Interpersonal Communication

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Interpersonal and personality factors affecting managerial communications. Styles and modes of communication in one-to-one, group, and large-systems settings. Opportunities offered to deepen understanding of one's own communication styles and skills, considering verbal, nonverbal perceptual, and cross-cultural aspects. S/U or letter grading.

  • 286. Negotiations Behavior

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Presentation of theoretical principles and concepts from psychology, sociology, and economics through lectures and readings, with focus primarily on improving practical negotiating skills through experiential learning (i.e., negotiations simulations). Participants learn not only to enhance their individual abilities in dyadic and group situations, but also to analyze contexts for most effective application of these skills. S/U or letter grading.

  • 291. Strategies for Technology-Based Corporate Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 420. Focus on key aspects of corporate business development transactions, including strategic deal selection, mergers and acquisitions deal integration, deal structure (including accounting and tax issues), and economic analysis of transactions. Examination of technology and digital media markets. Letter grading.

  • M292B. Growth, Science, and Technology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M280B.) Lecture, three hours. Economic growth and change. Role of advances in science and technology, and actions of maximizing innovators and factors impinging on their behavior. How technological breakthroughs (or discontinuities) can form new industries or transform nature of and population of firms in existing industries. S/U or letter grading.

  • M293A. Political Environment of American Business

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M281.) Lecture, three hours. Evaluation of certain criticisms made by business of American political system. Designed to provide clearer understanding of principal features of American politics, especially as they influence business enterprise. S/U or letter grading.

  • 293C. Ethical Considerations in Business

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of a range of ethical considerations in business decisions involving the individual, corporation, society, and international business. Analysis of cases for classroom presentation and discussion.

  • 294. Law and Economics Workshop

    Units: 2 or 3

    Seminar, two hours. Requisite: course 405 or Economics 201A. Knowledge of empirical methods and basic calculus required. Interdisciplinary speaker series bringing together outside speakers with scholars and students from UCLA Law School and academic departments. Topics include contracts, torts, intellectual property, and business law. Students write graded reaction papers. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with Economics 206 and Law 648. S/U or letter grading.

  • 295A. Entrepreneurship and Venture Initiation

    Units: 4

    Exploration in entrepreneurship particularly concerned with formation and operation of new business ventures. Significant and crucial aspects of exploring new business opportunities and starting a business.

  • 295B. Small Business Management

    Units: 4

    Exploration of crucial aspects in managing small business enterprises. Emphasis on identification and analysis of characteristic operating problems of small firms and application of appropriate methods or techniques for their solution.

  • 295C. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    Units: 4

    Inquiry into nature of entrepreneurship and effective implementation of entrepreneurial strategies in large industrial enterprises. Emphasis primarily on managerial effects aimed at identification, development, and exploitation of technical and organizational innovations, management of new product or process developments, and effective new venture management in a corporate context.

  • 295D. Business Plan Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 295A. Fundamentals of developing effective written business plans. Basic principles of developing plans for sales, marketing, product or service, operations, financials, and management and staffing functions of new startup businesses. S/U or letter grading.

  • 296A. International Business Management

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Identification, analysis, and resolution of managerial issues of policy and action within context of a multinational corporation, with emphasis on problems of adaptation to different sociological, cultural, legal, political, and economic environmental characteristics on planning, structuring of organizational relationships, and coordination and control in multinational firms. S/U or letter grading.

  • 297B. International Business Strategy

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Analysis of key strategic problems encountered by multinational corporations entering foreign markets. Application of concepts and theories acquired in other courses to series of complex cases on international business or by use of a complex simulation of competition in global markets. Letter grading.

  • 297C. International Business Law

    Units: 4

    Prerequisites: courses 205A, 296A. Legal environments in which international business operates; overseas business relationships and organizations; antitrust, taxation, transfer of capital, and technology regulations; patent, trademark, and copyright safeguards; arbitration of international business disputes; expropriation of foreign investments; international business and government relations.

  • 297D. International Business Negotiations

    Units: 4

    Prerequisite: course 296A. Exploration of international business negotiations of multinational enterprises with governmental agencies and foreign-based firms on a wide range of issues, such as establishment/dissolution of joint ventures, extent of foreign ownership/management control, terms/conditions for technology transfer, investment incentives.

  • 297E. Business and Economics in Emerging Markets

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 205A or 405. Analysis of changing economic, political, demographic, and sociocultural conditions in developing countries as they affect the business environment. Process of economic growth, market-oriented reforms, and creation of domestic capital markets. Inflation and stabilization programs, identification of business risks and opportunities, as well as tools needed to manage firms under these conditions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 298D. Special Topics in Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. In-depth examination of problems or issues of current concern in management, with numerous topics offered each year. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 298E. Special Topics in Management

    Units: 2

    Lecture, 90 minutes. Designed for graduate students. In-depth examination of problems or issues of current concern in management, with numerous topics offered each year. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 298F. Special Topics in Management

    Units: 1

    Lecture, one hour. Designed for graduate students. In-depth examination of problems or issues of current concern in management, with numerous topics offered each year. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 298G. Special Topics in Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. In-depth examination of problems or issues of current concern in management, with numerous topics offered each year. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 298H. Special Topics in Management

    Units: 2

    Lecture, 90 minutes. Designed for graduate students. In-depth examination of problems or issues of current concern in management, with numerous topics offered each year. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 298I. Special Topics in Management

    Units: 1

    Lecture, one hour. Designed for graduate students. In-depth examination of problems or issues of current concern in management, with numerous topics offered each year. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 400. Mathematics for Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Limited to graduate students. General mathematics review for M.B.A. students. Fundamental mathematics, including topics from algebra, differential calculus in single and multiple variables, logarithmic and exponential functions, probability, and statistics; applications, including economic theory, finance, time value of money, inventory management, linear programming, and mathematical models. S/U grading.

  • 402. Data and Decisions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Topics include probabilities, random variables (expectation, variance, covariance, normal random variables), decision trees, estimation, hypothesis testing, and multiple regression models. Emphasis on actual business problems and data. Letter grading.

  • 403. Financial Accounting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to fundamental financial accounting methods and procedures, with emphasis on financial statements. Provides basis for firm understanding of "language of business" -- accounting. Letter grading.

  • 405. Managerial Economics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Analysis of consumer, producer, and market behavior. Market structure, pricing, and resource allocation. Applications to managerial strategy and public policy, with emphasis on competition, market power, and externalities. Letter grading.

  • 406. Global Macroeconomy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 402, 403, 405. Provides analytical framework required for understanding way changing macroeconomic conditions in world economy affect economic growth, inflation, interest rates behavior, exchange rate determination, global competitiveness, unemployment, and trade account. Provides skills to enable students to assess critically how developments in world economy affect particular industry environments. Letter grading.

  • 407. Business Analytics with Spreadsheets

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 402. Introduction to uses of analytical methods for making strategic, tactical, and operational decisions arising from accounting, finance, marketing, and production, with focus on three key areas in problem solving: formal problem definition, spreadsheet model formulation, alternatives evaluation. Letter grading.

  • 408. Foundations of Finance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to managerial finance. Topics include time value of money, discounting and present values, valuation of bonds and stocks, risk and return, construction of optimal portfolios, capital budgeting, and weighted average cost of capital. Letter grading.

  • 409. Organizational Behavior

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 414A. Introduction to human resource management function and management of human behavior in organizations. Emphasis on relationships among individuals, groups, and organizational units as they influence managerial process and development of prospective general managers. Letter grading.

  • 410. Operations Technology Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 402, 403. Principles and decision analysis related to effective utilization of factors of production in manufacturing and nonmanufacturing activities for both intermittent and continuous systems. Production organizations, analytical models and methods, facilities design, and design of control systems for production operations. Letter grading.

  • 411. Marketing Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Principles of market-driven managerial decision making: consumer, competitor, and company analysis, market segmentation, definition of target markets, and product positioning. Management of marketing function: product and pricing decisions, channels of distribution, marketing communications. Letter grading.

  • 413A. Managerial Computing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Individual computing in support of strategic analysis, decision making, and management communication. Use of personal productivity tools, such as Excel and VBA, and network resources for data access. Emphasis on hands-on exercises. S/U or letter grading.

  • 414A. Leadership Foundations

    Units: 2

    Three-day residential format. Managing and working with people, with emphasis on motivation and development of individuals, leadership and interpersonal relationships, and group dynamics in complex organizational settings. S/U grading.

  • 420. Business Strategy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Evaluation and formulation of organization's overall policies and strategies. Economic, heuristic, and social process approaches to policy formulation, environmental analysis, and organizational appraisal. Senior management's role in managing policy process. Letter grading.

  • 421A. Communication Development for Leaders

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered 421.) Lecture, three hours. Course 421A is requisite to 421B. Focus on communication basics and tailored to students' needs--entrepreneurship, interpersonal communications, or public speaking. Students learn skills required to become successful presenter; how to present differing types of materials, apply communication theory and strategy to organize informative and persuasive content, and effectively deliver presentations to varied audiences; how to apply visual and verbal messaging research and theory while analyzing audiences, organize and target messages for maximum persuasive impact, and communicate these messages in persuasive manner. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 421B).

  • 421B. Communication Development for Leaders II

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 421A. Focus on providing tools and skills that allow students to excel in communicating their vision, inspiring and gaining commitment from stakeholders, and impressing interviewers and investors. Course materials are grounded in empirical research. Skills and techniques learned are broadly generalizable. Experiential exercises to enhance students' abilities in oral and written communications. Study builds on managerial communication skills from Communication Development for Leaders (course 421A). S/U or letter grading.

  • 422. Analysis and Communications

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Study and practice of oral and written management communications, including audience analysis, persuasion, revising and editing, presentation of technical information, and uses of computer technology. Organized around writing and speaking exercises. Personal attention to students' written communications and oral presentations.

  • 424. Strategic Business Presenting

    Units: 2

    Lecture, 90 minutes. Improvement of strategic business presenting skills such as presentation delivery techniques, visual and verbal persuasion principles, building arguments with supporting evidence, art of business storytelling, and other related topics, with focus on individual student presentations. Letter grading.

  • 425. Advanced Management Communication

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Advanced course on business presenting and management communication. Presentation of differing types of materials. Individual and team presentations to varied audiences. Examination of special topics in communication. S/U or letter grading.

  • 427A. Global Access Program

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 414B.) Fieldwork, 60 hours. Requisites: courses 402, 403, 405, 408, 409, 410, 411, 414A, 420. Limited to Fully Employed M.B.A. Program students. Must be taken in third year. Faculty-guided consulting project with international company or U.S. company with international project focus. Establishment of client relationships, identification of problems or strategic questions, design of study, collection and analysis of secondary and primary research data, development of comprehensive business plan, and formal presentation of findings and recommendations. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 427B).

  • 427B. Global Access Program

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 427.) Fieldwork, 60 hours. Requisites: courses 402, 403, 405, 408, 409, 410, 411, 414A, 420. Limited to Fully Employed M.B.A. Program students. Must be taken in third year. Faculty-guided consulting project with international company or U.S. company with international project focus. Establishment of client relationships, identification of problems or strategic questions, design of study, collection and analysis of secondary and primary research data, development of comprehensive business plan, and formal presentation of findings and recommendations. Letter grading.

  • 430. Corporate Finance

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 408. Consideration of broad range of issues faced by corporate financial managers. Analysis of firm's investment and financing decisions. Impact on firm of agency costs and asymmetric information. Study of mergers and acquisitions through use of empirical studies. Security design also covered. Letter grading.

  • 440. International Preorientation

    Units: 1

    Lecture, six hours. Limited to international students in M.B.A. program. Intensive communication workshop that meets six times (Saturdays included) per week for three weeks. Basic listening, speaking, writing, and working/leading teams for case analysis, cold call participation, presentations, and job search. Introduction to research and career resources. May not be applied toward M.B.A. degree. Offered in summer only. S/U grading.

  • 444A. Introduction to Applied Management Research

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Limited to full-time M.B.A. program students. Must be taken after completion of first year in program. Methods of organizational and strategic analysis to determine relationship of organization with its environment. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of courses 444B and 444C).

  • 444B. Applied Management Research: Two-Quarter Plan

    Units: 4

    Fieldwork, four hours. Limited to full-time M.B.A. program students. Must be taken after completion of first year in program. Projects include: (1) faculty-guided consulting project with private companies, nonprofit organizations, or government agencies; establishment of client relationships, identification of problems or strategic questions, design of study, collection and analysis of secondary and primary research data, development of comprehensive business plan, and formal presentation of findings and recommendations or (2) faculty-guided implementation of one new business or (3) pursuit of one faculty-led special research project worthy of publication in recognized academic research journal. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 444C).

  • 444C. Applied Management Research: Two-Quarter Plan

    Units: 4

    Fieldwork, four hours. Limited to full-time M.B.A. program students. Must be taken after completion of first year in program. Projects include: (1) faculty-guided consulting project with private companies, nonprofit organizations, or government agencies; establishment of client relationships, identification of problems or strategic questions, design of study, collection and analysis of secondary and primary research data, development of comprehensive business plan, and formal presentation of findings and recommendations or (2) faculty-guided implementation of one new business or (3) pursuit of one faculty-led special research project worthy of publication in recognized academic research journal. S/U or letter grading.

  • 445. Applied Management Research

    Units: 8

    Fieldwork, eight hours. Must be taken in second year (or its equivalent for part-time students). Supervised study of an organization, including establishment of client/consultant relationships, identification of problems or strategic questions, design of study, collection and analysis of data, development and reporting of implementable recommendations. Letter grading.

  • 454. Fieldwork in Organizations

    Units: 4

    Fieldwork, to be arranged. Preparation: completion of at least two terms of M.B.A. program. Required of all full-time M.B.A. students. Under direction of M.B.A. program senior associate dean or other supervising faculty adviser, students perform supervised practical experience or fieldwork in organization as intern or fellow. Execution of predetermined assignment(s) pursuant to defined program of study that includes reporting and assessment of fieldwork experience through combination of written or oral presentations and may include preparation of evaluations or consulting report correlating to defined program of study. S/U grading.

  • 455E. International Exchange Program

    Units: 2 to 16

    Lecture, 30 hours; discussion, 10 hours. Students attend up to four M.B.A.-level courses at institutions with exchange agreements with Anderson School. Some courses may be taught in local language. In addition to learning subject matter of courses, provides opportunity for students to enhance their knowledge of region while exchanging ideas and views with their peers at that institution. S/U grading.

  • 457. Fieldwork in Investment Management

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. Use of academic theories learned in a practical experience by managing a portfolio started with donated funds. Mirrors situations experienced by typical money management firms and includes investment strategy, asset allocation, security analysis, and organizational issues. S/U or letter grading.

  • 458A. Global Immersion: Two-Quarter Plan

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours; presentations, site visits, and discussion, 20 hours. Course 458A is enforced requisite to 458B. Taught in English. Designed for MBA, EMBA, FEMBA, and GEMBA students. Four on-campus academic sessions and one intensive week in another country for blend of lectures, guest speakers, panel discussions, and company site visits, with focus on doing business in other countries. Exposure to economy, legal and political environment, major industries and businesses, local culture, key historical events, and many aspects of conducting business outside U.S. Taught by school faculty members in conjunction with lectures by faculty members from top institutional partners, as well as local and regional government officials and ministers, local business executives, and influential leaders from country of focus. May be repeated for credit based on program requirements. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 458B).

  • 458B. Global Immersion: Two-Quarter Plan

    Units: 2

    Fieldwork, three hours; presentations, site visits, and discussion, 20 hours. Enforced requisite: course 458A. Taught in English. Designed for MBA, EMBA, FEMBA, and GEMBA students. Four on-campus academic sessions and one intensive week in another country for blend of lectures, guest speakers, panel discussions, and company site visits, with focus on doing business in other countries. Exposure to economy, legal and political environment, major industries and businesses, local culture, key historical events, and many aspects of conducting business outside U.S. Taught by school faculty members in conjunction with lectures by faculty members from top institutional partners, as well as local and regional government officials and ministers, local business executives, and influential leaders from country of focus. May be repeated for credit based on program requirements. Letter grading.

  • 458I. International Studies

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; presentations, site visits, and discussion, 20 hours. Preparation: completion of first-year core courses in Fully Employed M.B.A. Program. Taught in English. Intensive one-week program in one foreign country with five lectures at UCLA before and/or after trip. Courses taught by school faculty members in conjunction with faculty members from partner institutions in that country. Attendance at presentations by government officials and business executives in destination country. Exposure to business practices and operations in destination country through site visits, study of economy and political environment by comparing and contrasting it with U.S., and important historical and cultural aspects of destination country. May be repeated once for credit. Letter grading.

  • 459E. International Exchange

    Units: 2 to 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion and site visits, 20 hours. Preparation: completion of first-year core courses in Fully Employed M.B.A. Program. Taught in English. Intensive one-week program in one foreign country. Courses taught by faculty members from partner institutions in destination country. Topics vary but are tailored to M.B.A. curriculum. Exposure to local business practices, visiting companies, and exploration of local cultural and historical sites. S/U or letter grading.

  • 460A. Managing Finance and Financing Emerging Enterprises

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Course 460A is enforced requisite to 460B. Designed for second-year graduate students. Emphasis on financial, control, and investment issues confronting rapidly growing companies in entrepreneurial settings. Consideration and selection of financing vehicles that may be appropriate to securing money requirements of organizations. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 460B).

  • 460B. Managing Finance and Financing Emerging Enterprises

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 460A. Designed for second-year graduate students. Emphasis on financial, control, and investment issues confronting rapidly growing companies in entrepreneurial settings. Consideration and selection of financing vehicles that may be appropriate to securing money requirements of organizations. Letter grading.

  • 461A. Leadership Foundations I

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Focus on individual problem-solving and decision-making skills. Alternative conceptual frameworks presented for augmenting diagnostic and decision-making skills of individuals. Use of readings, cases, decision simulations, and discussions to explore areas of charting job and career progress, working with others, and shaping work culture. S/U or letter grading.

  • 461B. Leadership Foundations II

    Units: 1

    Lecture, one hour. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Continuation of course 461A, with focus on development of self-assessment and self-reflection skills. Facilitation of self-evaluation of leadership strengths and weaknesses, with emphasis on individual problem solving and decision making and team design and development. Readings, cases, decision simulations, peer coaching, and discussions. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 461C).

  • 461C. Leadership Foundations II

    Units: 1

    Lecture, one hour. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Continuation of course 461B. Further exploration of leadership strengths and weaknesses, with emphasis on individual peer coaching, conflict management, individual goal setting, and goal achievement. Readings, cases, decision simulations, peer coaching, and discussions. S/U grading.

  • 461D. Leadership Foundations III

    Units: 1

    Lecture, one hour. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Continuation of course 461C. Facilitation of self-evaluation of leadership strengths and weaknesses, with emphasis on career development, social networks, and organizational design. Readings, cases, decision simulations, peer coaching, and discussions. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 461E).

  • 461E. Leadership Foundations III

    Units: 1

    Lecture, one hour. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Continuation of course 461D. Further exploration of leadership strengths and weaknesses, with emphasis on individual leadership and organizational change. Readings, cases, decision simulations, peer coaching, and discussions. S/U grading.

  • 462. Economic Analysis for Managers

    Units: 4

    Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Policy-oriented problems in antitrust, tax securities, and environmental regulation. Concepts of microeconomic theory illustrated. Topics include traditional antitrust regulations, new trends in antitrust, private versus government antitrust, securities regulation, environmental regulations, and a business firm's optimal response to regulation.

  • 463. Data Analysis and Management Decisions under Uncertainty

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Survey of statistical model building, with emphasis on managerial interpretation of statistical summary of data. Classical statistics covered through multiple regression to support courses in finance and marketing that follow. Fundamental approaches to decision making under uncertainty. S/U or letter grading.

  • 464. Managerial Accounting

    Units: 4

    Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Familiarizes the manager with functions of accounting by focusing on use of external financial reports for evaluating corporate performance and use of accounting information for internal planning and control.

  • 466A. Financial Policy for Managers

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Modern financial management deals with decision making under uncertainty for corporate financial management, portfolio investment decisions, financial institutions, and international financial management. Focus on learning sound theoretical tools and applying them in casework. S/U or letter grading.

  • 466B. Advanced Financial Policy for Managers

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Modern financial management deals with decision making under uncertainty for corporate financial management, portfolio investment decisions, financial institutions, and international financial management. Focus on learning sound theoretical tools and applying them in casework. S/U or letter grading.

  • 467. Real-World Challenges Leaders Face

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Examination of range of ethical considerations in business decisions involving individuals, corporations, society, and international businesses. Analysis of cases for classroom presentation and discussion. Letter grading.

  • 468. Macroeconomics and Economic Forecasting

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Macroeconomic theory and its application to business forecasting. Major economic indicators and their historical description of the U.S. economy; theoretical tools that business economists use to analyze impacts of monetary and fiscal policy; macroeconometric techniques applicable to business decisions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 469. Organizational Behavior

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 469A.) Lecture, three hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Introduction to organizational behavior for executives, including but not limited to optimal decision making, fostering motivation, and other topics on psychology of leadership. Lecture, discussion, and experiential applications of course concepts. S/U or letter grading.

  • 470A. Introduction to Strategic Management Research

    Units: 2

    Fieldwork, two hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Methods of organizational and strategic analysis to determine relationship of organization with its environment. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of courses 470B and 470C).

  • 470B. Strategic Management Research

    Units: 4

    Fieldwork, four hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Preparation of strategic overview of selected company entailing collection and analysis of primary and secondary data, including (but not limited to) interviews of corporate executives, corporate financial and marketing data, industry reports, and customer and competitor interviews and/or surveys. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 470C).

  • 470C. Strategic Managment Research

    Units: 4

    Fieldwork, four hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Further research and analysis of one strategic issue facing selected company and identified in course 470B. Presentation of final reports and evaluation of student efforts by corporate personnel. S/U or letter grading.

  • 470D. Seminar: Policy Analysis

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Site visit to selected company, presentation of final reports, and evaluation of student efforts by corporate personnel. S/U or letter grading.

  • 471A. Management Practicum

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Two-term individual or group (three to five students) project on global strategic issues designed to allow students to employ and enhance concepts learned in classroom. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 471B).

  • 471B. Management Practicum

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Two-term individual or group (three to five students) project on global strategic issues designed to allow students to employ and enhance concepts learned in classroom. Letter grading.

  • 472A. Marketing Strategy and Policy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Strategic marketing decisions, including development of marketing objectives and strategies and implementation of these strategies through pricing, channel, promotion, and new product decisions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 472B. Customer Information Strategy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Exploration of innovation and marketing of products and services to customers. Use of creativity tools, customer research, and marketing science to create value and allocate resources so as to maximize revenues and profits that result. S/U or letter grading.

  • 474. Operations and Technology Management: Systems, Strategies, and Policies

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Analysis of strategic and operating policies and decisions for systems that produce goods and services. Examination of role of comprehensive planning, inventories, scheduling of resources, distribution systems, and system location. Comprehensive operating problems.

  • 476. Competitive Strategy and Business Policy

    Units: 4

    Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Study of general management task of forging a corporate competitive strategy. Emphasis on economics of business rivalry within a variety of industrial settings and implications of changing environments on business strategy.

  • 478. Selected Topics in Management

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, 90 minutes to three hours. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Examination of selected problems and issues in an area of current concern in management. S/U or letter grading.

  • 479E. International Exchange: Executive M.B.A. Program

    Units: 2 to 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion and site visits, 20 hours. Preparation: completion of first-year core courses in Executive M.B.A. Program. Intensive one-week program in one foreign country, with courses taught by faculty members from partner institutions in destination country. Topics vary but are tailored to M.B.A. curriculum, including but not limited to finance, marketing, global economics, strategy, human resources, operations, and technology management. Exposure to local business practices, company site visits, and exploration of local cultural and historical sites. S/U or letter grading.

  • 481A. Negotiations Behavior

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Course 481A is enforced requisite to 481B. Limited to Global Executive M.B.A. students. Presentation of theoretical principles and concepts from psychology, sociology, and economics through lectures and readings, with focus primarily on improving practical negotiating skills through experiential learning (i.e., negotiations simulations). Participants learn to enhance their individual abilities in dyadic and group situations and to analyze contexts for most effective application of these skills. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 481B).

  • 481B. Negotiations Behavior

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 481A. Limited to Global Executive M.B.A. students. Presentation of theoretical principles and concepts from psychology, sociology, and economics through lectures and readings, with focus primarily on improving practical negotiating skills through experiential learning (i.e., negotiations simulations). Participants learn to enhance their individual abilities in dyadic and group situations and to analyze contexts for most effective application of these skills. Letter grading.

  • 482. Negotiations Behavior

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Presentation of theoretical principles and concepts from psychology, sociology, and economics through lectures and readings, with focus primarily on improving practical negotiating skills through experiential learning (i.e., negotiations simulations). Participants learn to enhance their individual abilities in dyadic and group situations and to analyze contexts for most effective application of these skills. Letter grading.

  • 483. Management of Technology and Innovation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Problems of managing technological innovation in Asia. Topics include incorporation of technological consideration into strategy, adoption of technological innovation, promoting innovation through organizational design and leadership, e-business, and m-business. Letter grading.

  • 484A. Management of Technology and Innovation

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Course 484A is enforced requisite to 484B. Limited to Global Executive M.B.A. students. Problems of managing technological innovation in Asia. Topics include incorporation of technological consideration into strategy, adoption of technological innovation, promoting innovation through organizational design and leadership, e-business, and m-business. In Progress (484A) and letter (484B) grading.

  • 484B. Management of Technology and Innovation

    Units: 2

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 484A. Limited to Global Executive M.B.A. students. Problems of managing technological innovation in Asia. Topics include incorporation of technological consideration into strategy, adoption of technological innovation, promoting innovation through organizational design and leadership, e-business, and m-business. Letter grading.

  • 485. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Managerial efforts aimed at identification, development, and exploitation of technical and organizational innovations, management of new product or process developments, and effective new venture management in context of large corporations in manufacturing and service industries. Development of awareness and understanding of range, scope, and complexity of issues related to creation of organizational environment that is supportive of entrepreneurial endeavors, and insight concerning effective implementation of technological and organizational innovations in corporate setting. Letter grading.

  • 486. Strategic Leadership and Strategic Implementation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed to address several fundamental aspects of leading complex organizations, with emphasis on important tasks of developing well-aligned, high-performance organizations and on challenges of leading change in organizations. Enables students to develop organized point of view on strategic leadership and to increase their awareness of themselves as leaders. Letter grading.

  • 487A. Entrepreneurship and Venture Initiation I

    Units: 2

    Lecture, 90 minutes. Course 487A is enforced requisite to 487B. Limited to Global Executive M.B.A. Program students. Introduction to basic tools and jargon required for entrepreneurship that requires financing or management of intellectual property. Terminology used by lawyers, accountants, venture capitalists, and other investors when forming and financing new companies. Assessment of feasibility of business concept and communication of concept to potential investors, employees, and business partners. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 487B).

  • 487B. Entrepreneurship and Venture Initiation II

    Units: 2

    Lecture, 90 minutes. Enforced requisite: course 487A. Limited to Global Executive M.B.A. Program students. Introduction to basic tools and jargon required for entrepreneurship that requires financing or management of intellectual property. Terminology used by lawyers, accountants, venture capitalists, and other investors when forming and financing new companies. Assessment of feasibility of business concept and communication of concept to potential investors, employees, and business partners. Letter grading.

  • 488. Business Plan Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 487A, 487B. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. How to develop business plans, understanding of analytical processes required to produce plans, improvement of student writing and oral presentation skills, and review of business plans of other entities. Writing of one complete business plan and presentation of it to experienced investors. Letter grading.

  • 489. Entrepreneurship and Venture Initiation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, 90 minutes. Limited to Executive M.B.A. Program students. Introduction to basic tools and jargon required for entrepreneurship that requires financing or management of intellectual property. Terminology used by lawyers, accountants, venture capitalists, and other investors when forming and financing new companies. Assessment of feasibility of business concept and communication of concept to potential investors, employees, and business partners. S/U or letter grading.

  • 501. Cooperative Program

    Units: 2 to 8

    Preparation: consent of UCLA AGSM graduate adviser and assistant dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

  • 596. Research in Management

    Units: 1 to 8

    Directed individual study or research. May be repeated. S/U or letter grading.

  • 597. Preparation for Qualifying Examinations

    Units: 4 to 12

    Preparation for master's comprehensive examination or Ph.D. qualifying examinations. S/U grading.

  • 598. Thesis Research in Management

    Units: 4 to 12

    Research for and preparation of master's thesis. May be repeated. S/U grading.

  • 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research in Management

    Units: 4 to 12

    Research for and preparation of Ph.D. dissertation. S/U grading.