• 1. Introduction to Study of Language

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Summary, for general undergraduates, of what is known about human language; unique nature of human language, its structure, its universality, and its diversity; language in its social and cultural setting; language in relation to other aspects of human inquiry and knowledge. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 2. Language in U.S.

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Survey of languages of U.S. (American Indian languages, oldest immigrant languages, ethnic and regional varieties of English, and newest arrival languages) and social and political aspects of American language use. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 3. American Sign Language: Structure and Culture

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) not required. Introduction to principles of linguistics through study of structure of American Sign Language and culture of deaf Americans. Phonology, morphology, syntax of ASL, historical change, signed language universals, education, identity, and ASL literature. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 4. Language and Evolution

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Basic concepts and tools of evolutionary theory and linguistics relevant to how organisms with linguistic abilities could evolve, and how particular languages, as cultural artifacts, survive and change so rapidly. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 5. World Languages

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Introduction to linguistic diversity of world and to such core areas of linguistics as study of sound production and patterning (phonetics and phonology), word formation (morphology), and sentence formation (syntax). Structural characteristics of world languages and methods of classifying languages into families and types. Detailed discussion of representative languages with audiovisual illustrations to acquaint students with distinctive features of several key language families. Discussion of such linguistic concepts as pidgins and creoles, unaffiliated languages, language contact, and language endangerment, together with related sociopolitical issues. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 6. Out of Mouths of Babes

    Units: 4

    Lecture, six hours. How children acquire language, most complex of human cognitive achievements. Look at amazing linguistic abilities of infants and their first perception and production of speech sounds, then investigation of how children learn words and rules for producing and understanding sentences. Language acquisition in special populations such as children acquiring sign languages, bilingual children, and people acquiring language beyond critical period. Focus mainly on English, with consideration of other languages. Offered in summer only. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 8. Language in Context

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). How is meaning of language influenced by world around us? Introduction to pragmatics, speech acts, ordinary language philosophy, and linguistic relativity. Good foundation for students of linguistic theory, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and communication studies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 9W. Linguistic Humor: Amusing and Abusing with Language

    Units: 5

    Seminar, five hours. Requisite: English Composition 3. Study of how principles of science of linguistics are applied in analyzing language structure. Data from humor and other amusements, such as secret languages (Pig Latin and more). Introduction to basics of linguistics analysis, including language sound systems, syntactic analysis, word structure, word meaning, and pragmatics. Focus on nature of language as innate part of human biology that allows people from all cultural and linguistic backgrounds to adapt language for humorous purposes, albeit shaped by culture as to what counts as funny. Satisfies Writing II requirement. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M10. Structure of English Words

    Units: 5

    (Same as English M40.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to structure of English words of classical origin, including most common base forms and rules by which alternate forms are derived. Students may expect to achieve substantial enrichment of their vocabulary while learning about etymology, semantic change, and abstract rules of English word formation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 11. Language in Action: Perspectives from Applied Linguistics

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered Applied Linguistics 10.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for former Applied Linguistics 10 or 10W. Introduction to rich variety of topics, approaches, research, and resources in interdisciplinary field of applied linguistics as it is practiced at UCLA. Series of presentations by various faculty members whose work is in those areas. Introduction to various ways language works in real life and how this can be described and studied in systematic ways; designed to teach students to write effectively. Letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 20. Introduction to Linguistic Analysis

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Introduction to theory and methods of linguistics: universal properties of human language; phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic structures and analysis; nature and form of grammar. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 88A. Lower Division Seminar

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to freshmen/sophomores. Variable topics; consult "Schedule of Classes," College of Letters and Science, or department for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 88B. Lower Division Seminar

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to freshmen/sophomores. Variable topics; consult "Schedule of Classes," College of Letters and Science, or department for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 97. Variable Topics in Linguistics

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, three hours; fieldwork, two hours. Variable topics offered by departmental faculty members. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 102. Introduction to Applied Phonetics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 20 with grade of B- or better. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 103. Basics of articulation and acoustics of phonetic categories used in world's languages, including English in comparison with other languages. Practice in speech-sound perception and transcription using International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Applications to language learning/teaching and other fields. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 103. Introduction to General Phonetics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 20 with grade of B- or better. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 102. Phonetics of variety of languages and phonetic phenomena that occur in languages of world. Extensive practice in perception and production of such phenomena. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 104. Experimental Phonetics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 102 or 103. Survey of principal techniques of experimental phonetics. Use of laboratory equipment for recording and measuring phonetic phenomena. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 105. Morphology

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 20. In linguistics, morphology is study of word structure. Morphological theory seeks to answer questions such as how should words and their component parts (roots, prefixes, suffixes, vowel changes) be classified crosslinguistically? how do speakers store, produce, and process complex words (words with affixes, compounds)? how do speakers know how to produce correct word forms even when they have not previously heard them and how do speakers know that particular words are well-formed or ill-formed? is there principled distinction in traditional division between inflection and derivation? how can we best account for variation in forms that are same (e.g., root in keep/kept even though vowels are different)? can we formulate crosslinguistic generalizations about word structure? P/NP or letter grading.

  • 110. Introduction to Historical Linguistics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 102 or 103, 119A or 120A. Methods and theories appropriate to historical study of language, such as comparative method and method of internal reconstruction. Sound change, grammatical change, semantic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 110G. Introduction to Historical Linguistics for Graduate Students

    Units: 2

    Lecture, four hours. Limited to and designed for entering linguistics graduate students to help remedy entrance deficiencies in historical linguistics. Basic historical linguistics: methods and theories appropriate to historical study of language, such as comparative methods and method of internal reconstruction. Sound change, grammatical change, semantic change. S/U grading.

  • 111. Intonation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: courses 20, 102 or 103, one course from 119A, 119B, 120A, or 120B. Recommended: course 104 or 204A. Survey of intonational theory for English and other languages, with particular emphasis on phonological models of intonation. Laboratory equipment used for recording and analyzing intonation, and students learn to transcribe intonational elements. Letter grading.

  • 114. American Indigenous Linguistics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Strongly recommended preparation: course 20. Survey of genetic, areal, and typological classifications of American indigenous languages; writing systems for American indigenous languages; American indigenous languages in social and historical context. One or more languages may be investigated in detail. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M116. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Japanese M120.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: Japanese 3 or 8 or Japanese placement test. Introduction to Japanese grammar and sociolinguistics through reading, discussion, and problem solving in phonology, syntax, semantics, and discourse pragmatics. Letter grading.

  • 119A. Phonological Structures

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 20, and 102 or 103. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 120A. Sound structures and sound patterns in world's languages. Rules, rule ordering, features, syllable, and higher structure. Comparison of sound patterns of different languages. Tools of phonology as applicable to other fields. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 119B. Syntactic Structures

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 20 with grade of B- or better. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 120B. Syntactic structures and syntactic patterns in world's languages. Basic tools of syntactic analysis. Comparison of syntactic patterns of different languages. Tools of syntax as applicable to other fields. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120A. Phonology I

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 103. Introduction to phonological theory and analysis. Rules, representations, underlying forms, derivations. Justification of phonological analyses. Emphasis on practical skills with problem sets. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120B. Syntax I

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20 with grade of B- or better. Course 120A is not requisite to 120B. Descriptive analysis of morphological and syntactic structures in natural languages; emphasis on insight into nature of such structures rather than linguistics formalization. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120C. Semantics I

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 120B. Survey of most important theoretical and descriptive claims about nature of meaning. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 127. Syntactic Typology and Universals

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Study of essential similarities and differences among languages in grammatical devices they use to signal the following kinds of concepts: relations between nouns and verbs (case and word order), negation, comparison, existence/location/possession, causation, interrogation, reflexivization, relativization, attribution (adjectives), time (tense and aspect), and backgrounding (subordination). Data from a range of languages presented and analyzed. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C128A. Romance Syntax: French

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: some knowledge of French (or one Romance language). Enforced requisite: course 120B. Course C128A is enforced requisite to C128B. Aspects of structure of French language, with emphasis on properties of construction not found in English. Concurrently scheduled with course C228A. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C128B. Romance Syntax: French

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: some knowledge of French (or one Romance language). Enforced requisites: courses 120B, C128A. Aspects of structure of French language, with emphasis on properties of construction not found in English. Concurrently scheduled with course C228B. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 130. Language Development

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 119A or 120A, 119B or 120B. Survey of research and theoretical perspectives in language development in children. Discussion and examination of child language data from English and other languages. Emphasis on universals of language development. Topics include infant speech perception and production, development of phonology, morphology, syntax, and word meaning. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 132. Language Processing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 119A or 120A, 119B or 120B. Central issues in language comprehension and production, with emphasis on how theories in linguistics inform processing models. Topics include word understanding (with emphasis on spoken language), parsing, anaphora and inferencing, speech error models of sentence production, and computation of syntactic structure during production. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C135. Neurolinguistics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 119A and 119B or 120A and 120B. Examination of relationship between brain, language, and linguistic theory, with evidence presented from atypical language development and language disorders in the mature brain. Topics include methodologies to investigate normal and atypical hemispheric specialization for language and children and adults with acquired and/or congenital language disorders. Concurrently scheduled with course C235. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C140. Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 119A or 120A, 119B or 120B. Introduction to study of childhood bilingualism and adult and child second language (L2) acquisition, with focus on understanding nature of L2 grammar and grammatical processes underlying L2/bilingual acquisition. Discussion of neurolinguistic and social aspects of bilingualism. Concurrently scheduled with course C244. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M141. Current Methods of Language Teaching

    Units: 5

    (Same as English Composition M141.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 20. Survey of theory and practice in teaching second languages, including (1) past and present methods used to teach second languages, (2) current theory and practice underlying skills-based instruction and integrated approaches, and (3) factors that affect second language acquisition and learning. Development of knowledge base in and rational base for design, development, implementation, and evaluation of second language instruction programs. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 144. Fundamentals of Translation and Interpreting

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered M144.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended preparation: knowledge of English and at least one other language. Enforced requisite: course 20. Examination of salient lexical, structural, cultural, and social aspects of translating and interpreting between two languages or dialects. Survey of development of translation theories and rise of community interpreting and critical role of language brokering. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M146. Language in Culture

    Units: 5

    (Same as Anthropology M150.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; fieldwork, two hours. Requisite: course 20 or Anthropology 4. Study of language as aspect of culture; relation of habitual thought and behavior to language; and language and classification of experience. Holistic approach to study of language, with emphasis on relationship of linguistic anthropology to fields of biological, cultural, and social anthropology, as well as archaeology. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M150. Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics

    Units: 5

    (Same as Indo-European Studies M150.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 1 or 20. Indo-European languages (ancient and modern), including their relationships, chief characteristics, writing systems, and sociolinguistic contexts; nature of reconstructed Indo-European proto-language and proto-culture. One or more Indo-European languages may be investigated in detail. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 160. Field Methods

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 102 or 103, 119A or 120A, 119B or 120B. Analysis of language unknown to members of class from data elicited from native speaker of that language. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 161. Language Documentation

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20 (enforced), and 105 or 119A or 120A. Issues in documenting languages, including collection of primary data using linguistic field methods, organizing data into documents (annotated texts, dictionaries, multimedia presentations, technical articles), audiences for language documents (speakers of target languages, linguists, scholars outside linguistics, general public), presentation and storage of documents (paper publication, online publication, electronic and physical archives), documenting endangered languages, and organizations and initiatives for documenting endangered languages. Presentations focus on case studies. Student projects in assembling primary data and creating annotated texts with commentary. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 165A. Phonology II

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 120A. To be taken in term following completion of course 120A or as soon as possible thereafter. Further study in phonological theory and analysis: autosegmental theory, syllable structure, metrical theory, interface of phonology and grammar. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 165B. Syntax II

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 120B. To be taken in term following completion of course 120B or as soon as possible thereafter. Recommended for students who plan to do graduate work in linguistics. Form of grammars, word formation, formal and substantive universals in syntax, relation between syntax and semantics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 165C. Semantics II

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 120C. Recommended for students who plan to do graduate work in linguistics. Further study in relevant logics, relations between sentences, lexical semantics, tense and aspect, adverbs, modality and intensionality. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 170. Language and Society: Introduction to Sociolinguistics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 20. Study of patterned covariation of language and society; social dialects and social styles in language; problems of multilingual societies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 175. Linguistic Change in English

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 110, 120A, 120B. Principles of linguistic change as exemplified through detailed study of history of English pronunciation, lexicon, and syntax. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M176A. Japanese Phonology and Morphology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Japanese CM122.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended preparation: course 20. Enforced requisite: Japanese 3 or 8 or Japanese placement test. Survey of Japanese phonetics, phonology, and morphology. Letter grading.

  • M176B. Structure of Japanese

    Units: 4

    (Same as Japanese CM123.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: Japanese 4 or 10 or Japanese placement test. Functional linguistic analysis of grammatical structures of Japanese, often in form of contrastive analysis of Japanese, English, and other languages. Letter grading.

  • M177. Structure of Korean

    Units: 4

    (Same as Korean CM120.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended preparation: two years of Korean, or one year of Korean and some knowledge of linguistics. Discussion of major syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic characteristics of Korean in light of linguistic universals, with brief introduction to formation, typological features, and phonological structure of Korean. Letter grading.

  • M178. Contrastive Analysis of Japanese and Korean

    Units: 4

    (Same as Japanese CM127 and Korean CM127.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended preparation: two years of Japanese and knowledge of Hangul, or two years of Korean and knowledge of Hiragana. Prior linguistic background also recommended. Critical reading and discussion of selected current research papers in syntax, pragmatics, discourse, and sociolinguistics from perspective of contrastive study of Japanese and Korean. Letter grading.

  • 180. Mathematical Structures in Language I

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 119B or 120B. Recommended: Philosophy 31. Prior mathematics knowledge not assumed. Mathematical introduction to phonology, syntax, and semantics. Elementary material on logic, sets, functions, relations, and trees. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 185A. Computational Linguistics I

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Requisites: courses 120B, Program in Computing 10C (or Computer Science 32). Recommended: course 165B or 200B. Overview of formal computational ideas underlying kinds of grammars used in theoretical linguistics and psycholinguistics, and some connections to applications in natural language processing. Topics include recursion, relationship between probabilities and grammars, and parsing algorithms. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 185B. Computational Linguistics II

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Requisite: course 185A. Extensions of basic language processing techniques to natural language processing. Recent models of syntactic, semantic, and discourse analysis, with particular attention to their linguistic sophistication and psychological plausibility. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 191A. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Linguistics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 1 or 20. Research seminar on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 191B. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Linguistics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. Research seminar on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 192A. Undergraduate Practicum in Linguistics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, seven hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Training and supervised practicum for advanced undergraduate students to assist in linguistics courses. Students assist in preparation of materials and development of innovative programs under guidance of faculty members and teaching assistants. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Linguistics Department major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Linguistics Department. P/NP grading.

  • 192B. Undergraduate Practicum in Linguistics

    Units: 2

    Seminar, six hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Training and supervised practicum for advanced undergraduate students to assist in linguistics courses. Students assist in preparation of materials and development of innovative programs under guidance of faculty members and teaching assistants. May not be applied toward course requirements for any Linguistics Department major. Individual contract required. Information and contracts may be obtained from Linguistics Department. P/NP grading.

  • 197. Individual Studies in Linguistics

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, four hours. Requisite: course 1 or 20. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 198A. Honors Research in Linguistics I

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: 3.5 grade-point average. Requisite or corequisite: course 165A (or 200A) or 165B (or 200B). Recommended: completion of both courses 165A and 165B (or 200A and 200B) before or during term in which course 198A is taken. Limited to juniors/seniors. Development of honors thesis or comprehensive research project on linguistic topic selected by student under direct supervision of faculty member. Consult professor in charge to enroll. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 198B).

  • 198B. Honors Research in Linguistics II

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Requisite: course 198A. Limited to juniors/seniors. Completion of honors thesis or comprehensive research project begun in course 198A under direct supervision of faculty member. Consult professor in charge to enroll. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Linguistics

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to senior Linguistics majors. Supervised individual research or investigation of linguistic topic selected by student under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper required. Consult professor in charge to enroll. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 200A. Phonological Theory I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: graduate linguistics student or grade of A in course 120A or equivalent course in phonology. Courses 200A and 201A form two-course survey of current research in phonological theory. Interaction of phonology with morphology and syntax, syllable structure, stress. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200B. Syntactic Theory I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: graduate linguistics student or grade of A in course 120B or equivalent course in syntax. In-depth introduction to selected topics in theory of constituent structure and syntax of predicates, arguments, and grammatical relations. Topics include levels of representation, X-bar theory, case theory, thematic roles, the lexicon, grammatical function-changing rules, head-complement relations. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200C. Semantic Theory I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Overview of current results and research methods in linguistic semantics. Topics include generalized quantifiers and semantic universals, predicate argument structures, variable binding and pronominalization, formal semantic interpretation, syntax and LF, tense, ellipsis, and focus. Letter grading.

  • 201A. Phonological Theory II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 200A. Continuation of course 200A. Second course in two-course survey of current research in phonological theory. Topics include autosegmentalism (tone, tiers, segment structure), feature theory, underspecification, prosodic morphology. S/U or letter grading.

  • 201B. Syntactic Theory II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 200B. In-depth introduction to selected topics in theory of movement processes and topics selected from following areas: WH-movement and related rules, subjacency and other constraints on movement; ECP and related conditions on distribution of empty categories; resumptive pronoun constructions; parametric variation in movement constructions; LF WH-movement; filters; reconstruction; parasitic gaps; barriers theory; control theory; null subject parameter. S/U or letter grading.

  • 201C. Semantic Theory II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 200C. Survey of current approaches to model-theoretic semantics and its relation to current linguistic theory. Approaches include generalized categorial grammars, Montague grammar, Boolean-based systems, generalized quantifier theory, logical form. S/U or letter grading.

  • 202. Language Change

    Units: 4

    Prerequisites: courses 110, 200A, 200B. Survey of current theories and research problems in language change.

  • 203. Phonetic Theory

    Units: 4

    Prerequisite: course 120A. Preliminaries to speech analysis. Functional anatomy of vocal organs; fundamental principles of acoustics and of acoustic theory of speech production; issues in perception of speech; nature and design of feature systems for phonetic and phonological analysis.

  • 204A. Experimental Phonetics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 103. Use of laboratory equipment to investigate articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual properties of speech. Topics include experimental design and statistics; theoretical basis of acoustic structure of speech sounds; computer-based speech processing, analysis, and modeling; perceptual and acoustic evaluation of synthetic speech. S/U or letter grading.

  • 204B. Speech Production

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Requisite: course 104 or 204A. Survey of topics in speech production research, especially as related to linguistic phonetics. Topics include physiology of vocal tract and models of speech production and articulatory/acoustic relations. Emphasis on use of laboratory methods such as aerodynamic transducers, electroglottography, static and electropalatography, electromagnetic articulography, and imaging techniques. S/U or letter grading.

  • 204C. Speech Perception

    Units: 2 to 4

    Lecture, four hours. Recommended requisite: course 104 (or 204A) or 111 (or 211). Limited to graduate students. Survey of topics in speech perception research. Topics include auditory physiology and psychophysics, categorical speech perception, and cross-linguistic speech perception and word recognition. Emphasis on use of experimental methods such as lexical decision, gating, priming, eye tracking, phoneme monitoring, and word spotting. S/U or letter grading.

  • 205. Morphological Theory

    Units: 4

    Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Survey of current theories and research problems in morphology. Nature of morphological structure; derivational and inflectional morphology; relation of morphology to phonology, syntax, and the lexicon.

  • 208. Mathematical Structures in Language I

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 120B. Recommended: Philosophy 31. Prior mathematics knowledge not assumed. Mathematical introduction to phonology, syntax, and semantics. Elementary material on logic, sets, functions, relations, and trees. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209A. Computational Linguistics I

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Overview of formal computational ideas underlying kinds of grammars used in theoretical linguistics and psycholinguistics. Themes include role of recursion, relationship between structure and interpretation (both PF and LF), relationship between grammars and probabilities, and relationship between derivations and parsing. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209B. Computational Linguistics II

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Requisite: course 209A. Extensions of basic language processing techniques to natural language processing. Recent models of syntactic, semantic, and discourse analysis, with particular attention to their linguistic sophistication and psychological plausibility. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209C. Computational Semantics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: basic knowledge of semantics. Requisite: course 185A or 209A. Study of algorithms to compute and reason with meanings of sentences and texts. Phenomena such as anaphor resolution, presupposition projection, and tracking time, objects, and space to be covered. S/U or letter grading.

  • 210A. Field Methods I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: grade of B or better in course 103 or in examination on practical phonetics. Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Analysis of a language unknown to members of class from data elicited from a native speaker of the language. Term papers to be relatively full descriptive sketches of the language. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 210B. Field Methods II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 210A in preceding term. Because different languages are investigated in different years, course 210B can only be taken as direct continuation of 210A in same year. When there are multiple sections, continuation must be in same section. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 211. Intonation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisite: course 120A or 120B. Survey of intonational theory for English and other languages, with particular emphasis on phonological models of intonation. Laboratory equipment used for recording and analyzing intonation, and students learn to transcribe intonational elements. Letter grading.

  • 212. Learnability Theory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Survey of some of most significant results on capabilities of learners, given precise assumptions about their memory, time, and computational power, and precise assumptions about information provided by environment. S/U or letter grading.

  • 213A. Grammatical Development

    Units: 4

    Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Recommended: course 130 or 233. Survey of theoretical perspectives and contemporary empirical research in development of syntax and other components of grammar, with particular emphasis on acquisition theory, linguistic theory, and issues of learnability.

  • 213B. Brain Bases for Language

    Units: 4

    Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Recommended: course C135 or C235. Survey of theoretical perspectives and contemporary empirical research in neurological and cognitive bases for language, language development, and language breakdown.

  • 213C. Linguistic Processing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 165B and/or 200B. Recommended: courses 132 or 232, 201B. Survey of theoretical perspectives and contemporary empirical research in human processing of language (comprehension and/or production), with emphasis on syntactic processing, ambiguity resolution, effects of memory load, and relationship between grammar and processor. S/U or letter grading.

  • 214. Survey of Current Syntactic Theories

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 201B. Survey of several current syntactic theories, compared with one another and with theory discussed in course 201B, from point of view of theories' relative descriptive and explanatory power. S/U or letter grading.

  • 215. Syntactic Typology

    Units: 2 or 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 200B. Current results in word-order universals; genetic classification of world's languages; cross-language properties of specific construction types, including relative clauses, passives, positive and negative coreference systems, agreement systems, deixis systems, and types of sentence complements. S/U or letter grading.

  • 216. Syntactic Theory III

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 201B. Selected topics on syntactic theories of anaphora and quantification from the following areas: typology of binding categories (pronouns, anaphors, etc.); theory of locality conditions in binding theory; parametric variation in binding; quantifier movement; existential quantification and unselective binding; strong and weak crossover; superiority; scope interactions; complex quantifier structures. S/U or letter grading.

  • 217. Experimental Phonology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 200A. Survey of experimental work that bears on claims about speakers' knowledge of phonology, including theories of lexicon, relation between perception and phonology, and universal markedness relations. Letter grading.

  • 218. Mathematical Structures in Language II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. In-depth study of generalized quantifier theory; selected topics from distinctive feature theory, formal syntax, partial orders and lattices, formal language theory, variable binding operators. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.

  • 219. Phonological Theory III

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 201A. Current research and issues in phonological theory. Topics include structure of phonological representations, relations between representations, architecture of grammar, and explanations for phonological typology. S/U or letter grading.

  • 220. Linguistic Areas

    Units: 4

    Requisites: courses 120A, and 120B or 127. Recommended: courses 165A or 200A, 165B or 200B. Analysis and classification of languages spoken in a particular area (e.g., Africa, the Balkans, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Australia, Aboriginal North America, Aboriginal South America, Far East, etc.). May be repeated for credit with topic change.

  • 225. Linguistic Structures

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 120A, and 120B or 127. Recommended: courses 165A or 200A, 165B or 200B. Phonological and grammatical structure of a selected language and its genetic relationships to others of its family. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • C228A. Romance Syntax: French

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: some knowledge of French (or one Romance language). Enforced requisite: course 120B. Course C228A is enforced requisite to C228B. Aspects of structure of French language, with emphasis on properties of construction not found in English. Concurrently scheduled with course C128A. S/U or letter grading.

  • C228B. Romance Syntax: French

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: some knowledge of French (or one Romance language). Enforced requisites: courses 120B, C228A. Aspects of structure of French language, with emphasis on properties of construction not found in English. Concurrently scheduled with course C128B. S/U or letter grading.

  • 230. History of Linguistics

    Units: 4

    Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Aspects of history of linguistics. Different course offerings may deal with different areas of linguistics (e.g., phonology, syntax) or with different historical periods. May be repeated for credit with topic change.

  • 232. Language Processing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour. Central issues in language comprehension and production, with emphasis on how theories in linguistics inform processing models. Topics include word understanding (with emphasis on spoken language), parsing, anaphora and inferencing, speech error models of sentence production, and computation of syntactic structure during production. S/U or letter grading.

  • 233. Language Development

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 20, 120A, 120B. Survey of research and theoretical perspectives in language development in children. Discussion and examination of child language data from English and other languages. Emphasis on universals of language development. Topics include infant speech perception and production, development of phonology, morphology, syntax, and word meaning. S/U or letter grading.

  • C235. Neurolinguistics

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 20, 119A and 119B or 120A and 120B. Examination of relationship between brain, language, and linguistic theory, with evidence presented from atypical language development and language disorders in the mature brain. Topics include methodologies to investigate normal and atypical hemispheric specialization for language and children and adults with acquired and/or congenital language disorders. Concurrently scheduled with course C135. Graduate students expected to read more advanced neurolinguistic literature and produce research papers of greater depth. S/U or letter grading.

  • 236. Computational Phonology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Introduction to computational models of phonology and phonological acquisition. Topics include finite state machines, probabilistic automata, over-constrained models, dynamic programming methods. Letter grading.

  • M238. Analyzing Historical Texts

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M266C.) Seminar, four hours. Designed for graduate students. Analysis of linguistic structure and ethnohistorical context of legal and other documents written by native-speaking scribes and translators. Topics include paleographic technique and text analysis software. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 239. Research Design and Statistical Methods

    Units: 2 or 4

    Lecture, four hours. Topics include identifying and defining research topics, selecting appropriate research design and measurements, designing student experiments, recording, analyzing, and interpreting data. S/U or letter grading.

  • C244. Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 119A or 120A, 119B or 120B. Introduction to study of childhood bilingualism and adult and child second language (L2) acquisition, with focus on understanding nature of L2 grammar and grammatical processes underlying L2/bilingual acquisition. Discussion of neurolinguistic and social aspects of bilingualism. Concurrently scheduled with course C140. Graduate students expected to read more advanced literature, do in-class presentation, and submit graduate-level term paper. S/U or letter grading.

  • 251A. Topics in Phonetics and Phonology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Requisite: course 200A. Course 201A, 203, or 204A may be required. Specialized topics in phonetics and phonology. Meets with course 251B. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 251B. Topics in Phonetics and Phonology

    Units: 2

    Seminar, four hours. Requisite: course 200A. Course 201A, 203, or 204A may be required. Specialized topics in phonetics and phonology. May not be applied toward M.A. degree requirements. Meets with course 251A. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. S/U grading.

  • 252A. Topics in Syntax and Semantics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Requisite: course 200B. Course 201B, 201C, 214, 215, or 216 may be required. Specialized topics in syntax and semantics. Meets with course 252B. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 252B. Topics in Syntax and Semantics

    Units: 2

    Seminar, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 200B. Course 214, 215, or 216 may be required. Specialized topics in syntax and semantics. May not be applied toward M.A. degree requirements. Meets with course 252A. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 253A. Topics in Language Variation

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours.Requisite: course 110. Course 202 may be required. Specialized topics in language variation. Meets with course 253B. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 253B. Topics in Language Variation

    Units: 2

    Seminar, four hours. Requisite: course 110. Course 202 may be required. Specialized topics in language variation. May not be applied toward M.A. degree requirements. Meets with course 253A. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 254A. Topics in Linguistics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours. Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Course 201A, 201B, 201C, 202, 203, 204A, 205, 208, 209A, 209B, 212, 213A, 213C, 214, 215, 216, or 218 may be required. Individual proseminars on topics such as child language, sociolinguistics, neurolinguistics, computational linguistics, psycholinguistics, etc. Meets with course 254B. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 254B. Topics in Linguistics

    Units: 2

    Seminar, four hours. Requisites: courses 200A, 200B. Course 201A, 201B, 201C, 202, 203, 204A, 205, 208, 209A, 209B, 212, 213A, 213C, 214, 215, 216, or 218 may be required. Individual proseminars on topics such as child language, sociolinguistics, neurolinguistics, computational linguistics, psycholinguistics, etc. May not be applied toward M.A. degree requirements. Meets with course 254A. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 260A. Seminar: Phonetics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 260B. Seminar: Phonetics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 260C. Seminar: Phonetics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 261A. Seminar: Phonology

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 261B. Seminar: Phonology

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 261C. Seminar: Phonology

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 262A. Seminar: Syntax and Semantics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 262B. Seminar: Syntax and Semantics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 262C. Seminar: Syntax and Semantics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 264A. Seminar: Psycholinguistics/Neurolinguistics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. Special topics may include child language, neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, etc. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 264B. Seminar: Psycholinguistics/Neurolinguistics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. Special topics may include child language, neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, etc. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 264C. Seminar: Psycholinguistics/Neurolinguistics

    Units: 2 or 4

    Seminar, three hours. Special topics may include child language, neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, etc. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. degree requirements when taken for 2 units. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 265A. American Indian Linguistics Seminar

    Units: 1 or 4

    Seminar, two hours; fieldwork, four hours. Presentation of research on American Indian linguistics. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 1 unit. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 265B. American Indian Linguistics Seminar

    Units: 1 or 4

    Seminar, two hours; fieldwork, four hours. Presentation of research on American Indian linguistics. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 1 unit. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 265C. American Indian Linguistics Seminar

    Units: 1 or 4

    Seminar, two hours; fieldwork, four hours. Presentation of research on American Indian linguistics. May be taken independently for credit. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements when taken for 1 unit. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 275. Linguistics Colloquium

    Units: 4

    Preparation: completion of requirements. Varied linguistic topics, generally presentations of new research by students, faculty, and visiting scholars. S/U grading.

  • 276. Linguistics Colloquium

    Units: 0

    Designed for graduate students. Same as course 275, but taken without credit by students not presenting a colloquium. S/U grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 403. Practical Phonetics Training

    Units: 1

    Extensive practice in production, perception, and transcription of sounds from a wide range of languages. Concurrently scheduled with practical sections of course 103. S/U grading.

  • 411A. Research Orientation

    Units: 2

    Designed for graduate students. Sequence of lectures by department faculty to acquaint new graduate students with research directions and resources of department and elsewhere on campus. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements. S/U grading.

  • 411B. Research Orientation

    Units: 2

    Prerequisite: graduate standing. Sequence of lectures by department faculty to acquaint new graduate students with research directions and resources of department and elsewhere on campus. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements. S/U grading.

  • 422. Practicum: Phonetic Data Analysis

    Units: 2

    Designed for graduate students. Workshop in examination of phonetic data, such as sound spectrograms, oscillographic records, and computer output. May not be applied toward M.A. or Ph.D. degree requirements. S/U grading.

  • 444. M.A. Thesis Preparation Seminar

    Units: 4

  • 495. College Teaching of Linguistics

    Units: 2

    Seminar, to be arranged. Designed for graduate students. Required of all new teaching assistants. Seminars, workshops, and apprentice teaching. Selected topics, including curriculum development, various teaching strategies and their effects, teaching evaluation, and other topics on college teaching. Students receive unit credit toward full-time equivalence but not toward any degree requirements. S/U grading.

  • 501. Cooperative Program

    Units: 2 to 8

    Preparation: consent of UCLA graduate adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

  • 596A. Directed Studies

    Units: 1 to 8

    Preparation: completion of all undergraduate deficiency courses. Directed individual study or research. May be applied toward M.A. course requirements. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 596B. Directed Linguistic Analysis

    Units: 1 to 8

    Preparation: completion of degree requirements. Intensive work with native speakers by students individually. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 597. Preparation for M.A. Comprehensive and Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations

    Units: 1 to 8

    Preparation: at least six graduate linguistics courses. May be taken only in terms in which students expect to take comprehensive or qualifying examinations. May not be applied toward M.A. course requirements. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 598. Research for M.A. Thesis

    Units: 1 to 8

    Research and preparation of M.A. thesis. May not be applied toward M.A. course requirements. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 units. S/U grading.

  • 599. Research for Ph.D. Dissertation

    Units: 1 to 16

    Preparation: advancement to Ph.D. candidacy. May not be applied toward Ph.D. course requirements. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.