• 1. Earth's Physical Environment

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Study of Earth's physical environment, with particular reference to nature and distribution of landforms and climate and their significance to people. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 2. Biodiversity in Changing World

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Biogeographic exploration of plant and animal diversity and conservation issues on continents and islands around world. Study of physical, biotic, and human factors responsible for evolution, persistence, and extinction of species and ecological communities. Analysis of effects of human activity. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 3. Cultural Geography

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Introduction to cultural geography of modern world, with examination of key concepts of space, place, and landscape as these have shaped and been shaped by connections between societies and their natural environments. Examples from variety of landscapes and places since 1800 and especially from Los Angeles region. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 4. Globalization: Regional Development and World Economy

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Economic geography explores spatial distribution of all forms of human productive activity at number of geographical scales -- local, regional, national, and global. Key theme is impact of increasingly powerful global economic forces on organization of production. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 5. People and Earth's Ecosystems

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Exploration of ways in which human activity impacts natural environment and how modification of environment can eventually have significant consequences for human activity. Examination, using case studies, of real environmental problems that confront us today. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 6. World Regions: Concepts and Contemporary Issues

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Interdisciplinary and historical approach to modern peoples, their differences in wealth or poverty, and their local origins of food production. Brief introduction to physical geography and biogeography of each region. Discussion of each region's peoples, languages, foods, prehistories, and histories. Letter grading.

  • 7. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Designed for freshmen/sophomores. Introduction to fundamental principles and concepts necessary to carry out sound geographic analysis with geographic information systems (GIS). Reinforcement of key issues in GIS, such as geographic coordinate systems, map projections, spatial analysis, and visualization of spatial data. Laboratory exercises use database query, manipulation, and spatial analysis to address real-world problems. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 88A. Lower Division Seminar: Geography

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours; reading period, one hour. Seminars designed to explore various themes and issues pertinent to environment and people. Seminar topics advertised in department during previous term. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 88GE. Seminar Sequence: Special Topics in Geography

    Units: 5

    Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 5. Designed for sophomores/juniors. Exploration of aspects of lecture topic through readings, images, and discussions. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 98T. Border Studies: Mobility, (Extra)territoriality, and Sovereignty in Globalizing World

    Units: 5

    Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Freshmen/sophomores preferred. Examination of theory and modern issues in border studies in political geography and related disciplines and insights into research methodologies. Topics include challenges to modern nation-state system, securitization and externalization of borders discursively and in practice, and immigration and (im)mobility. Letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 100. Principles of Geomorphology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 1. Recommended: course 100A. Study of processes that shape world's landforms, with emphasis on weathering, mass movement and fluvial erosion, transport, deposition; energy and material transfers; space and time considerations. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 101. Coastal Geomorphology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 1. Recommended: course 101A. Study of origin and development of coastal landforms, with emphasis on past and present changes, hydrodynamic processes, sediment transfers, and such features as beaches, estuaries, lagoons, deltas, wetlands, dunes, seacliffs, and coral reefs, together with coastal zone management. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 102. Tropical Climatology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. In-depth exploration of development of tropical climate, with special reference to hurricanes, ENSO, and monsoons. Examination of human interaction with tropical climate processes and human-induced climate change in tropics. Use of climatological information to foster sound environmental management of climate-related resources in tropics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 104. Climatology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of many relations between climate and world of man. Application of basic energy budget concepts to microclimates of relevance to ecosystems of agriculture, animals, man, and urban places. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 105. Hydrology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 104, Statistics 12. Role of water in geographic systems: hydrologic phenomena in relation to climate, landforms, soils, vegetation, and cultural processes and impacts on landscape. Field projects required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 105A. Hydrology: Field and Laboratory

    Units: 2

    Laboratory/fieldwork, six hours. Corequisite: course 105. Field and laboratory investigations into role of water in geographic systems: hydrologic phenomena in relation to climate, landforms, soils, vegetation, and cultural processes and impacts on landscape. Students solve applied hydrology problems in laboratory and make hydrologic measurements in field. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M106. Applied Climatology: Principles of Climate Impact on Natural Environment

    Units: 4

    (Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M106.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of knowledge and tools to solve complex problems in contemporary applied climatology, including current practices, influence of climate on environment, and human influence on changing climates. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M107. Soil and Water Conservation

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M114.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 1 or 2 or Life Sciences 1 or 3. Designed for juniors/seniors. Systematic study of processes of and hazards posed by erosion, sedimentation, development, and pollution and techniques needed to conserve soil and maintain environmental quality. Scope includes agriculture, forestry, mining, and other rural uses of land. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 108. World Vegetation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Limited to juniors/seniors. Characteristics, distribution, environmental and cultural relationships of world's principal vegetation patterns. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M109. Human Impact on Biophysical Environment: What Science Has Learned

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M109.) Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of history, mechanisms, and consequences of interactions between humans and environment. Exploration in depth of three thematic topics (deforestation, desertification, and greenhouse gas increase and ozone depletion) and four major subjects (soil, biodiversity, water, and landforms). P/NP or letter grading.

  • 110. Population and Natural Resources

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of debate about environmental change and ability of planet to maintain growing population. Introduction and evaluation of basic demographic processes in context of food production, energy use, and environmental degradation. Discussion of major debates about use of resources in context of increasing population in developing countries and decreasing population in Western countries. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 111. Forest Ecosystems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; field trips. Requisite: course 2 or Life Sciences 1. Designed for juniors/seniors. Evaluation of ecological principles as they apply to forests. Emphasis on constraints of physical environment, biotic interactions, succession, disturbances, and long-term environmental change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 112. Analytical Animal Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 1, 2 or Life Sciences 1, Statistics 12. Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of processes of expanding and contracting distribution areas. Focus on island biogeography and its implications for biodiversity trends in natural and anthropogenic environments. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 113. Humid Tropics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 2 or 5 or Life Sciences 1. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of humid tropics, with emphasis on rainforests, their ecological principles, and forms of land use. Letter grading.

  • 114. Africa and African Diaspora in Americas

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Historical-geographical examination of Africa's role in Americas, with emphasis on environment, agriculture, food systems, and medicinal crops. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M115. Environmentalism: Past, Present, and Future

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M132 and Urban Planning M165.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of history and origin of major environmental ideas, movements or countermovements they spawned, and new and changing nature of modern environmentalism. Introduction to early ideas of environment, how rise of modern sciences reshaped environmental thought, and how this was later transformed by 19th-century ideas and rise of American conservation movements. Review of politics of American environmental thought and contemporary environmental questions as they relate to broader set of questions about nature of development, sustainability, and equity in environmental debate. Exploration of issues in broad context, including global climate change, rise of pandemics, deforestation, and environmental justice impacts of war. Letter grading.

  • 116. Biogeography of Plant and Animal Invasions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 1 or 2 or 5. Examination of theories and examples of invasion of new environments by plants and animals introduced through natural processes or by human activity. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M117. Ecosystem Ecology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Ecology and Evolutionary Biology M131.) Lecture, three hours; field trips. Enforced requisite: course 1 or Life Sciences 2. Designed for juniors/seniors. Development of principles of ecosystem ecology, with focus on understanding links between ecosystem structure and function. Emphasis on energy and water balances, nutrient cycling, plant-soil-microbe interactions, landscape heterogeneity, and human disturbance to ecosystems. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 118. Medical Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 5. Examination of patterns of population/place/disease interactions and some effects of change and development on disease etiology and problems of healthcare. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 119. Biophysical and Social Transformations in Northern Regions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 5. Substantial transformation of world's northern high latitudes due to climate change, natural resource development, and key demographic trends in 21st century. Climate models project rising mean air temperatures and precipitation, and less sea-ice cover in Arctic Ocean, consistent with field observations of rising river flows, shrinking glaciers, and thawing permafrost. Ability of northern societies to react to these phenomena is shaped by new legal frameworks, like aboriginal land-claims agreements in North America, and resource economics, like oil and gas industry in West Siberia. Eight northern countries (including U.S.) face array of challenges and opportunities ranging from species extinctions to increased viability of shipping lanes. Major cities like Vancouver and Helsinki are becoming highly desired places to live, emigrate, and work. Blending of principles of human and biophysical geography to gain new understanding of northern quarter of planet, placed within broader global context. Letter grading.

  • 122. Wildlife Conservation in Eastern and Southern Africa

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 5. Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of tropical ecosystems of eastern Africa, including wildlife communities, vegetation, climate, and human impact. Discussion of national park systems and their natural and anthropogenic ecological dynamics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 123. Bioresource Management

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 2, 5. Recommended: Statistics 12. Designed for juniors/seniors. Theory and practice of management and conservation of bioresources. Introduction to wildlife management, endangered species conservation, and design and maintenance of National Parks and ecological reserves. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124. Environmental Impact Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Preparation: two environmental studies cluster courses. Requisite: Statistics 12. Introduction to interdisciplinary analysis of local and regional impacts on environmental systems. Evaluation of state and federal concepts for analysis of environmental impact. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 125. Health and Global Environment

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Impact of environment and lifestyle on individual health examined from geographical perspective, with examples from both developed and developing countries. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 126. Geography of Extinction

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 5. Designed for juniors/seniors. Geographic and taxonomic survey and analysis of biotic extinctions over past 15,000 years. Identification of extinction factors and pathways through case studies of extinct and endangered species and communities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M127. Soils and Environment

    Units: 4

    (Same as Ecology and Evolutionary Biology M127 and Environment M127.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; field trips. General treatment of soils and environmental implications: soil development, morphology, and worldwide distribution of soil orders; physical, chemical, hydrologic, and biological properties; water use, erosion, and pollution; management of soils as related to plant growth and distribution. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M128. Global Environment and Development: Problems and Issues

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning CM166.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Questions of population, resource use, Third World poverty, and environment. Analysis of global economic restructuring and its connections to changing organization of production and resulting environmental impacts. Case studies from Africa, Latin America, Asia, and U.S. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 129. Seminar: Environmental Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Preparation: one course each from natural and human systems cores, three environmental studies cluster courses. Limited to seniors. Qualitative/quantitative analysis of problems associated with rational protection and use of selected environmental systems (urban, rural, forest, desert, coastal, water, soil, or others). P/NP or letter grading.

  • 130. Geographical Discovery and Exploration

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisites: courses 1, 3. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of history of exploration from earliest times to modern, with emphasis on period from Marco Polo to present. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M131. Environmental Change

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M130.) Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of natural forces producing environmental changes over past two million years. How present landscape reflects past conditions. Effects of environmental change on people. Increasing importance of human activity in environmental modification. Focus on impact of natural and anthropogenic changes on forests. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 132. Food and Environment

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Thematic orientation to food systems and their role in environmental and cultural transformations. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 133. Cultural Geography of Modern World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors and graduate students. Historical and structural approach to cultural geography of modern world system, with particular emphasis on structure and functioning of its core, semi-periphery, and periphery. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 135. African Ecology and Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Overview of contemporary ecological and development issues in sub-Saharan Africa. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M137. Historical Geography of American Environment

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M137.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of systematic changes of natural environment in U.S. during historical time, with emphasis on interplay between and among natural factors of climate, soils, vegetation, and landforms, and human factors of settlement, economic activity, technology, and cultural traits. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 138. Place, Identity, and Networked World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Communications technologies, such as personal computers and Internet, seem to be connected to dramatic changes in identities of people, groups, and places. Exploration of those changes and their implications for social institutions and human values and practices. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 139. Japan in World: Culture, Place, and Global Connections

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Focus on questions of culture and place in Japan. Exploration of ways that these questions -- and Japan itself -- have been shaped by historical and contemporary interactions involving people in both Japan and other parts of world. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 140. Political Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Spatiality of political activity, spatial constitution of political power, control over space as central component to political struggles. Studies at local, national, state, and global scales. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 141. Uneven Development Geographies: Prosperity and Impoverishment in Third World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Geographical perspective on part of globe commonly called Third World (global South). How development has shaped livelihood possibilities and practices, by global processes stretching back centuries, and transformative possibilities of Third World agency. World societies seek to transform Third World into their own image through theories and practices of colonialism, development, and globalization. Study of those theories and Third World alternatives to examine how they have shaped livelihood possibilities. Social differences between stagnant livelihood possibilities for Third World majority and minorities that prosper massively, as well as geographical differences (culturally, environmentally, and socially) across Third World. Examination of possibilities of Third World agency, ranging from interstate collaboration to village activism, asking whether such agency and alternative imaginaries can enable Third World residents to break with First World developmentalism. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 142. Population Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of social and behavioral perspectives influencing people in their patterns of demographic change, migration, and mobility, with special emphasis on spatial relationships and selected case studies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 143. Population in Interacting World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Provides multidisciplinary understanding of and appreciation for human population phenomena and problems in different parts of world and at different geographical scales -- from local to global. Particular emphasis on understanding and critically reflecting on (1) contemporary population problems at global, national, and local scale, including both dramatic decline and persistence of high levels of fertility in parts of developing world, record low fertility and population aging in highly industrialized countries, increasing levels of international migration, refugee crises, massive rural to urban migrations, and creation of mega-cities in less developed world, (2) policies adopted to address these problems, such as family planning policies to reduce fertility, immigration policies, and so on, and (3) gender dimension of contemporary population problems and policies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 144. Ethnicity in American Cities

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, two hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Designed to encourage and facilitate critical thinking about geographical aspects of ethnicity in contemporary America. Use of comparative perspective to explain changing distribution, social, economic, and political behavior, and adjustment problems ethnic groups face in contemporary American cities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 145. Slavery and Human Trafficking

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Enforced requisite: one course from 3, 4, Anthropology 9, Gender Studies 10, or Sociology 1. Limited to juniors/seniors. Exploration of how, why, and to what ends human trafficking has been conceptualized as global problem that warrants international response. Examination of recent activist, governmental, scholarly, and media responses, and reflection on what is and is not accomplished by them. Questions of human trafficking are implicitly geographical, requiring consideration of ways freedom is spatially defined and how movement across borders is encouraged and regulated. How questions of labor, migration, sexuality, rights, ethics, embodiment, representation, and governance pertain to human trafficking. What people mean when they speak of human trafficking as slavery. Meanings of slavery and freedom in world today using examples from U.S. and Europe, with focus on Philippines as case study for exploring both contemporary examples and historical forms of enslavement. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M146. Feminist Geography

    Units: 4

    (Same as Gender Studies M146.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Critical engagement of gender as concept of geographic inquiry. Gender as spatial process, analysis of feminist geographic theory and methods, landscapes of gender, challenges of representing gender. Spaces of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 147. Social Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Study of spatiality of social differences such as race, class, gender, age, sexuality, location. Critical explorations of identity, social categories, and spatial structures. Importance of space and place in social life. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 148. Economic Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 4. Designed for juniors/seniors. Geographical aspects of economic production and growth. General theory of space-economy. Land-use processes. Location of industry. Regional development. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M149. Transportation Geography

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M150.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 3 or 4. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of geographical aspects of transportation, with focus on characteristics and functions of various modes and on complexities of intra-urban transport. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 150. Urban Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of development, functions, spatial patterns, and geographic problems of cities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 151. Cities and Social Difference

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. City landscapes embody best and worst of U.S. society: diversity and poverty, opportunity and violence. Study of urban spaces, social differences, inequality, and conflicts over uses and meanings of city space. Social urban geography. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 152. Cities of Europe

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Limited to juniors/seniors. Urbanization of Europe, growth of city systems and internal spatial structure, functions, and geographic problems of contemporary European cities. Particular attention to historical development and landscapes of capital cities such as Rome, Paris, and Berlin. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M153. Past People and Their Lessons for Our Own Future

    Units: 5

    (Same as Anthropology M158Q and Honors Collegium M152.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Examination of modern and past people that met varying fates, as background to examination of how other modern people are coping or failing to cope with similar issues. Letter grading.

  • M153. Past People and Their Lessons for Our Own Future (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 5

    (Same as Anthropology M148 and Honors Collegium M152.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Examination of modern and past people that met varying fates, as background to examination of how other modern people are coping or failing to cope with similar issues. Letter grading.

  • 155. Industrial Location and Regional Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 4 or Economics 1 or 2 or 5 or 11. Designed for juniors/seniors. Reexamination of industrial location theory in light of contemporary theories of industrial organization and local labor markets. Consideration of empirical patterns of industrialization and regional growth, with special reference to Frostbelt/Sunbelt shifts and offshore relocation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 156. Metropolitan Los Angeles

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of origins, growth processes, internal structure and pattern, interactions, environmental and spatial problems of Los Angeles metropolitan area. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 158. Korean Urban Experience

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors with previous coursework in geography or East Asian studies. Study of cities by geographers entails analysis of evolution, functions, spatial patterns, and other geographical problems of urban societies throughout history. Examination of Korean urban experience as found in Seoul, South Korea, along with other cities in both Koreas and overseas where Korean diaspora resides. Korean experience to be juxtaposed against responses by other cities of world to similar challenges. Geography of housing and associated processes of urban redevelopment whereby built environment is continuously being reproduced and transformed. Current urban debates, as well as topics showing interplay between competing visions of city. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 159A. Problems in Geography: Urban and Regional Development Studies

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours; reading period, one hour. Preparation: completion of three courses in one concentration. Limited to seniors. Seminar course in which students carry out intensive research projects developed from courses within one concentration. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 159B. Problems in Geography: Spatial Demography and Social Processes in Cities

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours; reading period, one hour. Preparation: completion of three courses in one concentration. Limited to seniors. Seminar course in which students carry out intensive research projects developed from courses within one concentration. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 159C. Problems in Geography: Culture and Environment in Modern World

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours; reading period, one hour. Preparation: completion of three courses in one concentration. Limited to seniors. Seminar course in which students carry out intensive research projects developed from courses within one concentration. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 159D. Problems in Geography: Physical Geography

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours; reading period, one hour. Preparation: completion of three courses in one concentration. Limited to seniors. Seminar course in which students carry out intensive research projects developed from courses within one concentration. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 159E. Problems in Geography: Biogeography

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours; reading period, one hour. Preparation: completion of three courses in one concentration. Limited to seniors. Seminar course in which students carry out intensive research projects developed from courses within one concentration. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 162. Glacier Environments of California's High Sierra

    Units: 4

    Fieldwork, 10 hours; discussion, four hours. Introduction to alpine glacial environment through three hours of introductory lecture followed by intensive seven-day field trip to California's High Sierra. Students carry out laboratory exercises, as well as data collection for research projects designed around their individual interests. Presentation of additional evening lectures, using presentation facilities at Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory (SNARL). Offered in summer only. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 163. Field Analysis in Biogeography

    Units: 4

    Fieldwork, eight hours. Requisites: courses 2, 5, 108, 112. Examination of field procedures and intellectual concepts used in observation, measurement, analysis, and interpretation of phenomena pertinent to biogeography and interrelated human influences. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 166. Environmental Modeling

    Units: 4

    Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Presentation of basic concepts related to computer modeling of biogeochemical cycles, geomorphic processes, and other phenomena relevant to changing Earth and its inhabitants. Laboratory exercises include building basic computer models and working with existing models. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 167. Cartography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 7. Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of field of cartography. Theory and construction of map projections, compilation procedures, principles of generalization, symbolization, terrain representation, lettering, drafting and scribing, and map reproduction methods. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 168. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 7. Extension of basic concepts presented in course 7. How geographic and spatial analyses inform, integrate, and extend scientific inquiry in physical, life, and social sciences. Discussion of range of decisions and critical judgments necessary to carry out sound spatial analyses. Development of technical proficiency within geographic information systems (GIS) environment. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 169. Satellite Remote Sensing and Imaging Geographic Information Systems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 7. Introduction to fast-growing field of environmental monitoring from space. Application of Landsat, radar, Global Positioning System (GPS), and Earth Observing System satellites to land-use change, oceanography, meteorology, and environmental monitoring. Introduction to digital image-processing and imaging geographic information systems (GIS) software. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 170. Advanced Geographic Information Systems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 168. Introduction to full geographic information systems (GIS) functionality, using ARC/INFO on UNIX workstations. Spatial manipulation, query, and computation of datasets carried out in project-oriented approach. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M171. Introduction to Spatial Statistics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Statistics M171.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Requisite: one course from Statistics 10, 11, 12, 13, or 14. Introduction to methods of measurement and interpretation of geographic distributions and associations. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 172. Remote Sensing: Digital Image Processing and Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 169. Digital processing methods for manipulating and analyzing image data. Topics include statistical description, geometric and radiometric correction, classification, image enhancement and filtering, and change detection schemes. Reinforcement of procedures presented in lecture with laboratory exercises and student project. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 173. Geographic Information Systems Programming and Development

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 168. Introduction to fundamental concepts and architecture of programming objects in widely used geographic information systems (GIS), and programming in GIS environment. Topics include GIS customization and development using variety of programming languages. Lectures followed by laboratory exercises. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 174. Advanced Remote Sensing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisites: courses 169, 172. Remote sensing in visible and infrared wavelength regions to understand basic concepts of radiation propagation and interaction with matter, how digital remote sensing images are acquired, and constraints on available data and data analysis. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 177. Field Methods in Physical Geography

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M127. Examination of field procedures and concepts used in observation, measurement, analysis, and interpretation of physical phenomena pertinent to natural and built environment. Topics vary from year to year and may include soils, geomorphology, and field methods in geographic information science. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 180. North America

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Delimitation and analysis of principal geographic regions of U.S. and Canada. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 181. Mexico, Central America, Caribbean

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of geographic factors, physical and cultural, that are basic to understanding historical development of Middle America and contemporary economic and cultural geography of Mexico and countries of Central America and West Indies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 182A. Spanish South America

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of geographic factors, physical and cultural, that are basic to understanding historical development of Spanish South America and contemporary economic and cultural geography of individual Spanish-speaking countries. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 182B. Brazil

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of geographic factors, physical and cultural, that are basic to understanding historical development of Portuguese South America and contemporary economic and cultural geography of Brazil. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 183. The Mediterranean World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study of geographic factors, physical and cultural, that are basic to understanding historical development of Mediterranean region, with emphasis on 1500s to present. Introduction to great disputes in history and ecology centered on this region and character of two shores of Mediterranean basin. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 184. California

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Limited to juniors/seniors. Systematic and regional treatment of geography of California, including physical, cultural, and economic aspects and detailed studies of various regions. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 185. South and Southeast Asia

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Limited to juniors/seniors. Regional synthesis with varying emphasis on people of South or Southeast Asia in their physical, biotic, and cultural environment and its dynamic transformation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 186. Contemporary China

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Systematic geographic analysis of elements of landscape, resources, population, and socioeconomic characteristics of People's Republic of China. Dynamics that have led to China's major role in East Asian and international scene, with special attention to China-Japan and Sino-American relations and their geographic bases. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 191. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Research seminars on selected topics in geography. Some sections may require prior coursework. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit and may be applied as elective units toward departmental majors and minors. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 194. Research Group Seminars: Geography

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; research group meeting, two hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field or of research of faculty members or students. May meet concurrently with graduate research seminar. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP grading.

  • C194A. Research Group Seminars: Issues in Biophysical Geography

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Bimonthly seminar to discuss current research in biophysical geography. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C296A. P/NP grading.

  • C194A. Research Group Seminars: Issues in Biophysical Geography (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Bimonthly seminar to discuss current research in biophysical geography. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C299B. P/NP grading.

  • 195. Community or Corporate Internships in Geography

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, four hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship of eight to 10 hours per week in supervised setting in community agency or business. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports of their experience. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP grading.

  • 198A. Honors Research in Geography I

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: 3.25 grade-point average overall, at least five upper division geography courses with 3.5 grade-point average. Limited to juniors/seniors. Development and completion of honors thesis or comprehensive research project under direct supervision of one or two faculty members. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 198B. Honors Research in Geography II

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: 3.25 grade-point average overall, at least five upper division geography courses with 3.5 grade-point average. Limited to juniors/seniors. Development and completion of honors thesis or comprehensive research project under direct supervision of one or two faculty members. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 199. Special Study

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors with B average in major or seniors. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 200. Advanced Topics in Geomorphology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, eight hours. Preparation: two courses from 101, 103, 105, M107. Requisite: course 100. Analysis of geomorphic theories since scientific revolution, with emphasis on catastrophism, uniformitarianism, glacial theories, isostasy and eustasy, evolution and cyclicity, thermodynamics and mechanics, quantification, and current paradigms. View of each theme in its contemporary milieu. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200A. History and Structure of Modern Geography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 297A.) Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Evolution of field of geography in 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis on professionalization of geography and its emergence as modern academic discipline. S/U or letter grading.

  • 200B. Seminar: Geographical Inquiry

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered 298A.) Seminar, one hour. Discussion of geographical research within context of philosophical debates concerning nature of scientific inquiry. S/U grading.

  • 201. Research Design in Geography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 299D.) Lecture, four hours. Introduction to logic of geographic inquiry. Topics include questions surrounding philosophy of science, research design issues, and range of methodologies available to and implemented by geographers to enable students to evaluate geographic literature critically. S/U or letter grading.

  • 202. Qualitative Methods and Methodology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 299C.) Seminar, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Examination of definition and use of qualitative methodology and methods in social-cultural geographic research. Exploration of relationship between methodology and epistemology; review of range of research methods and techniques, including interviewing and focus groups, observation, action research, ethnography, and interpretation of material culture, and consideration of ethical and practical issues of conducting qualitative research. S/U or letter grading.

  • 204. Advanced Climatology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 204A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: first year of calculus and acquaintance with Fortran IV. Requisite: course 104. Introduction to tools and concepts of environmental physics of relevance to natural and man-made landscapes. Such basic intellectual, mathematical, and computer programming tools are of special concern to physical geographers, ecologists, and architects. S/U or letter grading.

  • 204. Statistical Methods for Geographic Research (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 299A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisite: course M171. Use of linear models, discriminant functions, and factor analysis to analyze problems in geography. S/U or letter grading.

  • 205. Seminar: Climatology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 204. Selected topics. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M205. Spatial Statistics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M272.) (Same as Statistics M222 and Urban Planning M215.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Survey of modern methods used in analysis of spatial data. Implementation of various techniques using real data sets from diverse fields, including neuroimaging, geography, seismology, demography, and environmental sciences. S/U or letter grading.

  • M206. Introduction to Biophysical Modeling of Land Surface Processes and Land/Atmosphere Interactions

    Units: 4

    (Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M206.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, one hour; reading period, one hour. Designed for graduate students. Presentation of introductory knowledge for graduate students to understand nature, principles, and scope of biophysical modeling of land surface processes, including ideal canopy model, radiation, heat and CO2 fluxes transfer, and satellite data application. Laboratory sessions included. S/U or letter grading.

  • 207. Regional Climate and Terrestrial Surface Processes

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Physical concepts and basic principles of land-surface/atmosphere interactions. Exploration of topics in terms of regional and global perspective and implications. Human activities cause changes in land cover, which in turn affect regional climate. Some regions, in particular, appear to be "hot spots." Regions to be studied in detail. S/U or letter grading.

  • 208. Advanced Topics in Biogeography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, one hour. Requisites: courses 108, and 110 or 116. Intensive review and analysis of physical and cultural factors influencing plant distributions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 208. Geographic Data Visualization and Analysis (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 299B.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: course 168, Statistics 12. Development of broad base of knowledge and set of skills that foster conduct of high-quality geographic data analysis. S/U or letter grading.

  • 211. Remote Sensing of Environment

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 299E.) Laboratory, three hours; independent study, two hours. Requisite: course 167. Study of aerial photographs and other remote sensing images as tools for geographical research. Particular attention to analysis of landscapes and interpretation of interrelationships of individual features in their physical and cultural complex. S/U or letter grading.

  • 212. Physical, Mathematical, and Computational Basis of Remote Sensing

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 299F.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: courses 169, 172. Intensive review and analysis of fundamental physics, mathematics, and computer science that underlie modern remote sensing and application of this knowledge to modern geographical problems. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 213. Seminar: Biogeography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Requisite: course 208. Related research projects growing out of course 208 or former course 212. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 214. Advanced Projects in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)/Remote Sensing

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 268.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 169 or 170 or Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences 150. Familiarity with GIS or image processing package expected. Individualized research projects conducted on UNIX platforms within structured course environment. All aspects of modest but original project, including data acquisition, ingestion, and analysis; interpretation of results and presentation in publication-style format. Letter grading.

  • 215. Advanced Field and Laboratory Methods in Biophysical Geography (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 260.) Laboratory, five hours; fieldwork, five hours. Examination of advanced field and laboratory procedures used in contemporary biophysical geography research. May be repeated for credit with instructor change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 215. Advanced Topics in Environmental Change

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours; fieldwork, three hours. Preparation: at least one course from 200 through 205 or one appropriate graduate course in atmospheric and oceanic sciences or Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Analysis of changing physical environment of Quaternary period. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 216. Advanced Field Analysis: Biogeography

    Units: 8

    (Formerly numbered 262.) Fieldwork, 10 hours. Observation, measurement, and analysis of biogeographic phenomena, including identification and evaluation of biotic populations and communities and their modifications resulting from impact of human activity. S/U or letter grading.

  • 218. Advanced Medical Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 118. In-depth study of selected topics in medical geography and intense review of recent research. S/U or letter grading.

  • 223. Seminar: Humid Tropics

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Designed for graduate students. Selected topics. Biophysical and cultural complexes of humid tropics, with emphasis on problems related to human settlement and livelihood. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M224. International Migration

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M243.) (Same as Sociology M236B.) Lecture, three hours. Further exploration of key current theoretical debates in study of international migration, with emphasis on exploring both theoretical debates of field and empirical data and case studies on which those debates hinge, to encourage students to undertake research in field. S/U or letter grading.

  • 227. Land Degradation

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Discussion on impact of human activities and institutions on terrestrial ecosystems and goods and services they provide. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 228. Human Security and Environmental Change

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Discussion of impact of environmental change on food, water, and physical security of human populations and societies' adaptations to environmental change. Topics vary from year to year. S/U or letter grading.

  • M229A. Development Theory

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M234A.) Lecture, three hours. Review of basic literature and schools of thought on development theory through analysis of impact of mercantilism, colonialism, capitalism, and socialism on various urban and rural social and economic structures in Third World. Presentation, through evaluation of theoretical writings and case studies, of complexity and diversity of developing countries. Emphasis on linkages between policy and rural and urban impacts. Gives students important background for courses M229B, M229C, and many other planning courses addressing Third World issues. Letter grading.

  • M229B. Ecological Issues in Planning

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M234B.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: Urban Planning M265. Science and politics of modern environmentalism and planning in light of transformations inherent in global change, including how to address these questions in ways that go beyond green consumerism and bifurcation of wild, ecological, and human environments. American environmentalism has become dominant model for many conservation practices. Informed by Muirist model of idea of untrammeled nature with people-less set-asides for spiritual and scientific contemplation of nature; this approach used in environmental policy and as key idea in conservation and fragment biology. At opposite end is environmental planning devoted to infrastructure in hyper-human habitats (cities). Exploration of these competing models and many reasons to be skeptical of both in 21st century. Letter grading.

  • M229C. Resource-Based Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M234C.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: course M229A. Some major issues associated with development of specific natural resources. Topics include nature of particular resource (or region associated with it), its previous management, involvement of state, corporations, and local groups, and environmental and social impact of its development. Letter grading.

  • M230A. Theories of Regional Economic Development I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M236A.) (Same as Public Policy M240 and Urban Planning M236A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to theories of location of economic activity, trade, and other forms of contact between regions, process of regional growth and decline, reasons for different levels of economic development, relations between more and less developed regions. Letter grading.

  • M230B. Globalization and Regional Development

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M236B.) (Same as Urban Planning M236B.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course M236A. Application of theories of regional economic development, location, and trade learned in course M236A to contemporary process known as globalization. Examination of nature and effects of globalization on development, employment, and social structure, along with implications for policy. Letter grading.

  • 231. Advanced Topics in Economic Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Advanced study of economic theories and principles S/U or letter grading.

  • 232. Advanced Topics in Cultural Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 133. Lectures and discussions around specific aspects of development of cultural landscape in different geographic environments. S/U or letter grading.

  • 233. Seminar: Cultural Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Discussions on particular topics in cultural geography. Content may vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 235. Seminar: Social Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, one hour. Process of doing social/cultural geography entails conceptualizing, adapting, and reformulating social and critical theories of space, subject, and power. Examination of this process by considering theoretical themes that shape concepts of social space and social research. Theoretical discussions of recent research in social/cultural geography, particularly around topics of gender, race sexuality, subjects and spatiality resistance and agenda, and social difference and identity. S/U or letter grading.

  • 236. Seminar: Cultural Geography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 233.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Discussions on particular topics in cultural geography. Content may vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M236A. Theories of Regional Economic Development I

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M240 and Urban Planning M236A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to theories of location of economic activity, trade, and other forms of contact between regions, process of regional growth and decline, reasons for different levels of economic development, relations between more and less developed regions. Letter grading.

  • M236B. Globalization and Regional Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M236B.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course M236A. Application of theories of regional economic development, location, and trade learned in course M236A to contemporary process known as globalization. Examination of nature and effects of globalization on development, employment, and social structure, along with implications for policy. Letter grading.

  • 237. Seminar: Historical Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Theory and practice of historical geography in North America and Europe. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 238. Seminar: Urban Geography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 251.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Requisite: course 250. Related research projects growing out of course 250. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240. Advanced Political Geography: Geopolitics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, one hour. Intensive study of theories and principles of geopolitics. Selected regions used as examples of differing techniques of study in geopolitics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240. Seminar: Geographic Thought (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 295.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Designed for graduate students. Discussion and study of topics significant to growth of modern philosophy of geography. S/U or letter grading.

  • M241. Seminar: Political Geography of Italy

    Units: 4

    (Same as Italian M241.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Themes in political geography with particular emphasis on Italy. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 242. Advanced Population Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 142. Study of population dynamics and migration, spatial variation in population composition, and population resource problems, diffusion, and epidemiology. S/U or letter grading.

  • M243. International Migration

    Units: 4

    (Same as Sociology M236B.) Lecture, three hours. Further exploration of key current theoretical debates in study of international migration, with emphasis on exploring both theoretical debates of field and empirical data and case studies on which those debates hinge, to encourage students to undertake research in field. S/U or letter grading.

  • 245. Advanced Political Geography: Geopolitics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 240.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, one hour. Intensive study of theories and principles of geopolitics. Selected regions used as examples of differing techniques of study in geopolitics. S/U or letter grading.

  • 247. Advanced Topics in Cultural Geography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 232.) Seminar, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 133. Lectures and discussions around specific aspects of development of cultural landscape in different geographic environments. S/U or letter grading.

  • 248. Advanced Topics in Economic Geography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 231.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Advanced study of economic theories and principles S/U or letter grading.

  • 249. Advanced Population Geography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 242.) Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 142. Study of population dynamics and migration, spatial variation in population composition, and population resource problems, diffusion, and epidemiology. S/U or letter grading.

  • 250. Advanced Topics in Urban Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, one hour. General study of hierarchy of urban places, including diffusion within urban hierarchy and theories to account for location and size distribution of cities. S/U or letter grading.

  • 251. Seminar: Urban Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Requisite: course 250. Related research projects growing out of course 250. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 255. Physical Basis of Geography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 297B.) Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Critical evaluation of formative influences, paradigm shifts, and present challenges of physical geography, illustrated from historical developments and changing research frontiers in geomorphology, climatology, oceanography, hydrology, and soils. S/U or letter grading.

  • 256. Regional Climate and Terrestrial Surface Processes

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 207.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Physical concepts and basic principles of land-surface/atmosphere interactions. Exploration of topics in terms of regional and global perspective and implications. Human activities cause changes in land cover, which in turn affect regional climate. Some regions, in particular, appear to be hot spots. Regions to be studied in detail. S/U or letter grading.

  • 257. Land Degradation

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 227.) Seminar, three hours. Discussion on impact of human activities and institutions on terrestrial ecosystems and goods and services they provide. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 258. Human Security and Environmental Change

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 228.) Seminar, three hours. Discussion of impact of environmental change on food, water, and physical security of human populations and societies' adaptations to environmental change. Topics vary from year to year. S/U or letter grading.

  • 260. Advanced Field and Laboratory Methods in Biophysical Geography

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, five hours; fieldwork, five hours. Examination of advanced field and laboratory procedures used in contemporary biophysical geography research. May be repeated for credit with instructor change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 260. Evolution, Ecology, Environmentalism, and Roots of Modern American Geography (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 297C.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, one hour. Discussion of how contemporaneous development of modern concepts of evolution, ecology, and environmentalism influenced, and were influenced by, development of modern geography as academic discipline. S/U or letter grading.

  • 262. Advanced Field Analysis: Biogeography

    Units: 8

    Fieldwork, 10 hours. Observation, measurement, and analysis of biogeographic phenomena, including identification and evaluation of biotic populations and communities and their modifications resulting from impact of human activity. S/U or letter grading.

  • M265. Environmentalisms

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M265.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Review of environmental theories and their practices in dynamic U.S. and international contexts. Issues of climate change, scenario planning, and matrix ecology and its implications in both urban and rural settings. Exploration of problematics of increasing internationalization (or international implications) of environmental practices as part of both green and black economies. What does integrated environmental planning look like in this century? Letter grading.

  • 268. Advanced Projects in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)/Remote Sensing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 169 or 170 or Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences 150. Familiarity with GIS or image processing package expected. Individualized research projects conducted on UNIX platforms within structured course environment. All aspects of modest but original project, including data acquisition, ingestion, and analysis; interpretation of results and presentation in publication-style format. Letter grading.

  • M270A. Seminar: Climate Dynamics

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M272A and Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M270A.) Seminar, two hours. Archaeological, geochemical, micropaleontological, and stratigraphic evidence for climate change throughout geological past. Rheology and dynamics of climatic subsystems: atmosphere and oceans, ice sheets and marine ice, lithosphere and mantle. Climate of other planets. Modeling, simulation, and prediction of modern climate on monthly, seasonal, and interannual time scale. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M270B. Seminar: Climate Dynamics

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M272B and Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M270B.) Seminar, two hours. Archaeological, geochemical, micropaleontological, and stratigraphic evidence for climate change throughout geological past. Rheology and dynamics of climatic subsystems: atmosphere and oceans, ice sheets and marine ice, lithosphere and mantle. Climate of other planets. Modeling, simulation, and prediction of modern climate on monthly, seasonal, and interannual time scale. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M270C. Seminar: Climate Dynamics

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Same as Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences M272C and Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences M270C.) Seminar, two hours. Archaeological, geochemical, micropaleontological, and stratigraphic evidence for climate change throughout geological past. Rheology and dynamics of climatic subsystems: atmosphere and oceans, ice sheets and marine ice, lithosphere and mantle. Climate of other planets. Modeling, simulation, and prediction of modern climate on monthly, seasonal, and interannual time scale. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 271. Seminar: Climatology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 205.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, one hour. Requisite: course 280. Selected topics. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 272. Seminar: Biogeography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 213.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Requisite: course 281. Related research projects growing out of course 281. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M272. Spatial Statistics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Statistics M222 and Urban Planning M215.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Survey of modern methods used in analysis of spatial data. Implementation of various techniques using real data sets from diverse fields, including neuroimaging, geography, seismology, demography, and environmental sciences. S/U or letter grading.

  • 274. Seminar: Humid Tropics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 223.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Designed for graduate students. Selected topics. Biophysical and cultural complexes of humid tropics, with emphasis on problems related to human settlement and livelihood. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 277. Coastal Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Discussion of various coastal topics from biophysical, ecological, and human perspectives. Content may vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 280. Advanced Climatology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 204.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Preparation: first year of calculus and acquaintance with Fortran IV. Requisite: course 104. Introduction to tools and concepts of environmental physics of relevance to natural and man-made landscapes. Such basic intellectual, mathematical, and computer programming tools are of special concern to physical geographers, ecologists, and architects. S/U or letter grading.

  • 281. Advanced Topics in Biogeography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 208.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, one hour. Requisites: courses 108, and 110 or 116. Intensive review and analysis of physical and cultural factors influencing plant distributions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 282. South America

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Introduction to main issues in geography of South America, with focus mainly on cultural/historical geographical perspectives on national period; themes and periods can be adapted to individual interests. S/U or letter grading.

  • 283. Advanced Topics in Geomorphology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 200.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; reading period, eight hours. Preparation: two courses from 101, 105, M107. Requisite: course 100. Analysis of geomorphic theories since scientific revolution, with emphasis on catastrophism, uniformitarianism, glacial theories, isostasy and eustasy, evolution and cyclicity, thermodynamics and mechanics, quantification, and current paradigms. View of each theme in its contemporary milieu. S/U or letter grading.

  • 286. Advanced Topics in Environmental Change (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 215.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours; fieldwork, three hours. Preparation: one course from 271, 280, 283, or one appropriate graduate course in atmospheric and oceanic sciences or Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Analysis of changing physical environment of Quaternary period. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 286. Geography of Contemporary China

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Designed for graduate students. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 290. South America

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 282.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Introduction to main issues in geography of South America, with focus mainly on cultural/historical geographical perspectives on national period; themes and periods can be adapted to individual interests. S/U or letter grading.

  • 291. Geography of Contemporary China

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 286.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Designed for graduate students. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 292. Advanced Regional Geography: Selected Regions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: appropriate upper division regional course. Lecture series devoted to one specific region at discretion of instructor. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M292. Seminar: Political Geography of Italy

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M241.) (Same as Italian M241.) Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Themes in political geography with particular emphasis on Italy. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 295. Seminar: Geographic Thought

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, two hours. Designed for graduate students. Discussion and study of topics significant to growth of modern philosophy of geography. S/U or letter grading.

  • C296A. Research Group Seminars: Issues in Biophysical Geography

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Bimonthly seminar to discuss current research in biophysical geography. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C194A. S/U grading.

  • 296B. Cultural Geography Methods Workshop

    Units: 1

    Seminar, two hours. Biweekly forum for presentation and discussion of new concepts, theories, and methods at juncture of geography, humanities, and environmental study. Principal focus on landscape, but scope of cultural study within geography also embraced. S/U grading.

  • 296C. Political Geography Working Group

    Units: 1

    Seminar, two hours. Limited to graduate students. Biweekly forum for analysis of current geopolitics, with emphasis on geographic impacts of recent global events. S/U grading.

  • 296D. Agriculture and Food Studies Colloquium

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Current scholarly debates surrounding topics on agriculture and food. Interdisciplinary discussion, with focus on research that explores confluence of production and consumption studies vis-à-vis agriculture and food. Group discussion of recently published work, works-in-progress by participants, and distinguished guest speakers. S/U grading.

  • 296E. Research Group Seminars: Issues in Human Geography

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Bimonthly seminar to discuss current research in human geography. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 297A. History and Structure of Modern Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Evolution of field of geography in 19th and 20th centuries, with emphasis on professionalization of geography and its emergence as modern academic discipline. S/U or letter grading.

  • 297B. Physical Basis of Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; reading period, one hour. Critical evaluation of formative influences, paradigm shifts, and present challenges of physical geography, illustrated from historical developments and changing research frontiers in geomorphology, climatology, oceanography, hydrology, and soils. S/U or letter grading.

  • 297C. Evolution, Ecology, Environmentalism, and Roots of Modern American Geography

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; reading period, one hour. Discussion of how contemporaneous development of modern concepts of evolution, ecology, and environmentalism influenced, and were influenced by, development of modern geography as academic discipline. S/U or letter grading.

  • 298. Advanced Regional Geography: Selected Regions

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 292.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: appropriate upper division regional course. Lecture series devoted to one specific region at discretion of instructor. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 298A. Seminar: Geographical Inquiry

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of geographical research within context of philosophical debates concerning nature of scientific inquiry. S/U grading.

  • 299A. Research Group Seminars: Issues in Human Geography (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered 296E.) Seminar, one hour. Bimonthly seminar to discuss current research in human geography. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 299A. Statistical Methods for Geographic Research

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisite: course M171. Use of linear models, discriminant functions, and factor analysis to analyze problems in geography. S/U or letter grading.

  • 299B. Geographic Data Visualization and Analysis

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Requisites: course 168, Statistics 12. Development of broad base of knowledge and set of skills that foster conduct of high-quality geographic data analysis. S/U or letter grading.

  • C299B. Research Group Seminars: Issues in Biophysical Geography

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered C296A.) Seminar, one hour. Bimonthly seminar to discuss current research in biophysical geography. Topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C194A. S/U grading.

  • 299C. Cultural Geography Methods Workshop (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered 296B.) Seminar, two hours. Biweekly forum for presentation and discussion of new concepts, theories, and methods at juncture of geography, humanities, and environmental study. Principal focus on landscape, but scope of cultural study within geography also embraced. S/U grading.

  • 299C. Qualitative Methods and Methodology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Examination of definition and use of qualitative methodology and methods in social-cultural geographic research. Exploration of relationship between methodology and epistemology; review of range of research methods and techniques, including interviewing and focus groups, observation, action research, ethnography, and interpretation of material culture, and consideration of ethical and practical issues of conducting qualitative research. S/U or letter grading.

  • 299D. Political Geography Working Group (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered 296C.) Seminar, two hours. Limited to graduate students. Biweekly forum for analysis of current geopolitics, with emphasis on geographic impacts of recent global events. S/U grading.

  • 299D. Research Design in Geography

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Introduction to logic of geographic inquiry. Topics include questions surrounding philosophy of science, research design issues, and range of methodologies available to and implemented by geographers to enable students to evaluate geographic literature critically. S/U or letter grading.

  • 299E. Agriculture and Food Studies Colloquium (Effective Fall 2017 )

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered 296D.) Seminar, one hour. Current scholarly debates surrounding topics on agriculture and food. Interdisciplinary discussion, with focus on research that explores confluence of production and consumption studies vis-à-vis agriculture and food. Group discussion of recently published work, works-in-progress by participants, and distinguished guest speakers. S/U grading.

  • 299E. Remote Sensing of Environment

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, three hours; independent study, two hours. Requisite: course 167. Study of aerial photographs and other remote sensing images as tools for geographical research. Particular attention to analysis of landscapes and interpretation of interrelationships of individual features in their physical and cultural complex. S/U or letter grading.

  • 299F. Physical, Mathematical, and Computational Basis of Remote Sensing

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Enforced requisites: courses 169, 172. Intensive review and analysis of fundamental physics, mathematics, and computer science that underlie modern remote sensing and application of this knowledge to modern geographical problems. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 495. Teaching College Geography

    Units: 2

    Seminar, one hour; laboratory, three hours. Classroom practice in teaching, with individual and group instruction on related educational methods, materials, and evaluation. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual Study or Research

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 597. Preparation for Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Independent study. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 598. Research for and Preparation of M.A. Thesis

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Independent study. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Independent study. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.