• 1. Undergraduate Seminar

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 1.) Seminar, one hour; outside study, two hours. Introduction by faculty members and industry lecturers to electrical engineering disciplines through current and emerging applications of autonomous systems and vehicles, biomedical devices, aerospace electronic systems, consumer products, data science, and entertainment products (amusement rides, etc.), as well as energy generation, storage, and transmission. P/NP grading.

  • 2. Physics for Electrical Engineers

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 2.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: Physics 1C. Introduction to concepts of modern physics necessary to understand solid-state devices, including elementary quantum theory, Fermi energies, and concepts of electrons in solids. Discussion of electrical properties of semiconductors leading to operation of junction devices. Letter grading.

  • 2H. Physics for Electrical Engineers (Honors)

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 2H.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: Physics 1C. Honors course parallel to course 2. Letter grading.

  • 3. Introduction to Electrical Engineering

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 3.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to field of electrical engineering. Basic circuits techniques with application to explanation of electrical engineering inventions such as telecommunications, electrical grid, automatic computing and control, and enabling device technology. Research frontiers of electrical engineering. Introduction to measurement and design of electrical circuits. Letter grading.

  • 10. Circuit Theory I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 10.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 3 (or Computer Science 1 or Materials Science 10), Mathematics 33A, Physics 1B. Corequisites: course 11L (enforced), Mathematics 33B. Introduction to linear circuit analysis. Resistive circuits, capacitors, inductors and ideal transformers, Kirchhoff laws, node and loop analysis, first-order circuits, second-order circuits, Thevenin and Norton theorem, sinusoidal steady state. Letter grading.

  • 10H. Circuit Theory I (Honors)

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 10H.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 3 (or Computer Science 1 or Materials Science 10), Mathematics 33A, Physics 1B. Corequisites: course 11L (enforced only for Computer Science and Engineering and Electrical Engineering majors), Mathematics 33B. Honors course parallel to course 10. Letter grading.

  • 11L. Circuits Laboratory I

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 11L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour; outside study, one hour. Enforced corequisite: course 10. Experiments with basic circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors, and transformers. Ohm's law voltage and current division, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition, transient and steady state analysis. Letter grading.

  • M16. Logic Design of Digital Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M16.) (Same as Computer Science M51A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Introduction to digital systems. Specification and implementation of combinational and sequential systems. Standard logic modules and programmable logic arrays. Specification and implementation of algorithmic systems: data and control sections. Number systems and arithmetic algorithms. Error control codes for digital information. Letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 100. Electrical and Electronic Circuits

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 100.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Mathematics 33A, 33B or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 82, Physics 1C. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 110. Electrical quantities, linear circuit elements, circuit principles, signal waveforms, transient and steady state circuit behavior, semiconductor diodes and transistors, small signal models, and operational amplifiers. Letter grading.

  • 101A. Engineering Electromagnetics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 101A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32A and 32B, or 33A and 33B, Physics 1C. Electromagnetic field concepts, waves and phasors, transmission lines and Smith chart, transient responses, vector analysis, introduction to Maxwell equations, static and quasi-static electric and magnetic fields. Letter grading.

  • 101B. Electromagnetic Waves

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 101B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 101A. Time-varying fields and Maxwell equations, plane wave propagation and interaction with media, energy flow and Poynting vector, guided waves in waveguides, phase and group velocity, radiation and antennas. Letter grading.

  • 102. Systems and Signals

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 102.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Mathematics 33A. Corequisite: Mathematics 33B. Elements of differential equations, first- and second-order equations, variation of parameters method and method of undetermined coefficients, existence and uniqueness. Systems: input/output description, linearity, time-invariance, and causality. Impulse response functions, superposition and convolution integrals. Laplace transforms and system functions. Fourier series and transforms. Frequency responses, responses of systems to periodic signals. Sampling theorem. Letter grading.

  • 110. Circuit Theory II

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 110.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10, M16 (or Computer Science M51A), 102. Corequisite: course 111L (enforced only for Computer Science and Engineering and Electrical Engineering majors). Sinusoidal excitation and phasors, AC steady state analysis, AC steady state power, network functions, poles and zeros, frequency response, mutual inductance, ideal transformer, application of Laplace transforms to circuit analysis. Letter grading.

  • 110H. Circuit Theory II (Honors)

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 110H.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 10, M16 (or Computer Science M51A), 102. Corequisite: course 111L. Sinusoidal excitation and phasors, AC steady state analysis, AC steady state power, network functions, poles and zeros, frequency response, mutual inductance, ideal transformer, application of Laplace transforms to circuit analysis. Letter grading.

  • 110L. Circuit Measurements Laboratory

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 110L.) Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Requisite: course 100 or 110. Experiments with basic circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors, and op-amps. Ohm's law voltage and current division, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition, transient and steady state analysis, and frequency response principles. Letter grading.

  • 111L. Circuits Laboratory II

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 111L.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, one hour; outside study, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses 10, 11L. Enforced corequisite: course 110. Experiments with electrical circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors, transformers, and op-amps. Steady state power analysis, frequency response principles, op-amp-based circuit synthesis, and two-port network principles. Letter grading.

  • 112. Introduction to Power Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 112.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 110. Complete overview of organization and operation of interconnected power systems. Development of appropriate models for interconnected power systems and learning how to perform power flow, economic dispatch, and short circuit analysis. Introduction to power system transient dynamics. Letter grading.

  • 113. Digital Signal Processing

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 113.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 102. Relationship between continuous-time and discrete-time signals. Z-transform. Discrete Fourier transform. Fast Fourier transform. Structures for digital filtering. Introduction to digital filter design techniques. Letter grading.

  • 113DA. Digital Signal Processing Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 113DA.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 113. Real-time implementation of digital signal processing algorithms on digital processor chips. Experiments involving A/D and D/A conversion, aliasing, digital filtering, sinusoidal oscillators, Fourier transforms, and finite wordlength effects. Course project involving original design and implementation of signal processing systems for communications, speech, audio, or video using DSP chip. In progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 113DB).

  • 113DB. Digital Signal Processing Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 113DB.) Laboratory, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 113, 113DA. Real-time implementation of digital signal processing algorithms on digital processor chips. Experiments involving A/D and D/A conversion, aliasing, digital filtering, sinusoidal oscillators, Fourier transforms, and finite wordlength effects. Course project involving original design and implementation of signal processing systems for communications, speech, audio, or video using DSP chip. Completion of projects begun in course 113DA. Letter grading.

  • 114. Speech and Image Processing Systems Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 114.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 113. Design principles of speech and image processing systems. Speech production, analysis, and modeling in first half of course; design techniques for image enhancement, filtering, and transformation in second half. Lectures supplemented by laboratory implementation of speech and image processing tasks. Letter grading.

  • 115A. Analog Electronic Circuits I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 115A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 110. Review of physics and operation of diodes and bipolar and MOS transistors. Equivalent circuits and models of semiconductor devices. Analysis and design of single-stage amplifiers. DC biasing circuits. Small-signal analysis. Operational amplifier systems. Letter grading.

  • 115AL. Analog Electronics Laboratory I

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 115AL.) Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Enforced requisites: courses 110L or 111L, 115A. Experimental determination of device characteristics, resistive diode circuits, single-stage amplifiers, compound transistor stages, effect of feedback on single-stage amplifiers, operational amplifiers, and operational amplifier circuits. Introduction to hands-on design experience based on individual student hardware design and implementation platforms. Letter grading.

  • 115B. Analog Electronic Circuits II

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 115B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 115A. Analysis and design of differential amplifiers in bipolar and CMOS technologies. Current mirrors and active loads. Frequency response of amplifiers. Feedback and its properties. Stability issues and frequency compensation. Letter grading.

  • 115C. Digital Electronic Circuits

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 115C.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: course 115A, Computer Science M51A. Recommended: course 115B. Transistor-level digital circuit analysis and design. Modern logic families (static CMOS, pass-transistor, dynamic logic), integrated circuit (IC) layout, digital circuits (logic gates, flipflops/latches, counters, etc.), computer-aided simulation of digital circuits. Letter grading.

  • 115E. Design Studies in Electronic Circuits

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 115E.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 115B. Description of process of circuit design through lectures to complement other laboratory-based design courses. Topics vary by instructor and include communication circuits, power electronics, and instrumentation and measurement and may entail simulation-based design projects. Emphasis throughout on design-oriented analysis and rigorous approach to practical circuit design. Letter grading.

  • M116C. Computer Systems Architecture

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M116C.) (Same as Computer Science M151B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisites: course M16 or Computer Science M51A, Computer Science 33. Recommended: course M116L or Computer Science M152A, Computer Science 111. Computer system organization and design, implementation of CPU datapath and control, instruction set design, memory hierarchy (caches, main memory, virtual memory) organization and management, input/output subsystems (bus structures, interrupts, DMA), performance evaluation, pipelined processors. Letter grading.

  • M116L. Introductory Digital Design Laboratory

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M116L.) (Same as Computer Science M152A.) Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Enforced requisite: course M16 or Computer Science M51A. Hands-on design, implementation, and debugging of digital logic circuits, use of computer-aided design tools for schematic capture and simulation, implementation of complex circuits using programmed array logic, design projects. Letter grading.

  • M117. Computer Networks: Physical Layer

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M117.) (Same as Computer Science M117.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, six hours. Not open to students with credit for course M171L. Introduction to fundamental computer communication concepts underlying and supporting modern networks, with focus on wireless communications and media access layers of network protocol stack. Systems include wireless LANs (IEEE802.11) and ad hoc wireless and personal area networks (e.g., Bluetooth, ZigBee). Experimental project based on mobile radio-equipped devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) as sensor platforms for personal applications such as wireless health, positioning, and environment awareness, and experimental laboratory sessions included. Letter grading.

  • M119. Fundamentals of Embedded Networked Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M119.) (Same as Computer Science M119.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 131A or Civil and Environmental Engineering 110 or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A, course 132B or Computer Science 118, Computer Science 33. Design trade-offs and principles of operation of cyber physical systems such as devices and systems constituting Internet of Things. Topics include signal propagation and modeling, sensing, node architecture and operation, and applications. Letter grading.

  • 121B. Principles of Semiconductor Device Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 121B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 2. Introduction to principles of operation of bipolar and MOS transistors, equivalent circuits, high-frequency behavior, voltage limitations. Letter grading.

  • 121DA. Semiconductor Processing and Device Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 121DA.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Enforced requisite or corequisite: course 121B. Design fabrication and characterization of p-n junction and transistors. Students perform various processing tasks such as wafer preparation, oxidation, diffusion, metallization, and photolithography. Introduction to CAD tools used in integrated circuit processing and device design. Device structure optimization tool based on MEDICI; process integration tool based on SUPREM. Course familiarizes students with those tools. Using CAD tools, CMOS process integration to be designed. In progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 121DB).

  • 121DB. Semiconductor Processing and Device Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 121DB.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisites: courses 121B, 121DA. Design fabrication and characterization of p-n junction and transistors. Students perform various processing tasks such as wafer preparation, oxidation, diffusion, metallization, and photolithography. Introduction to CAD tools used in integrated circuit processing and device design. Device structure optimization tool based on MEDICI; process integration tool based on SUPREM. Course familiarizes students with those tools. Using CAD tools, CMOS process integration to be designed. Letter grading.

  • 123A. Fundamentals of Solid-State I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 123A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 2 or Physics 1C. Limited to junior/senior engineering majors. Fundamentals of solid-state, introduction to quantum mechanics and quantum statistics applied to solid-state. Crystal structure, energy levels in solids, and band theory and semiconductor properties. Letter grading.

  • 123B. Fundamentals of Solid-State II

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 123B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 123A. Discussion of solid-state properties, lattice vibrations, thermal properties, dielectric, magnetic, and superconducting properties. Letter grading.

  • 128. Principles of Nanoelectronics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 128.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: Physics 1C. Introduction to fundamentals of nanoscience for electronics nanosystems. Principles of fundamental quantities: electron charge, effective mass, Bohr magneton, and spin, as well as theoretical approaches. From these nanoscale components, discussion of basic behaviors of nanosystems such as analysis of dynamics, variability, and noise, contrasted with those of scaled CMOS. Incorporation of design project in which students are challenged to design electronics nanosystems. Letter grading.

  • 131A. Probability and Statistics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 131A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 10 hours. Requisites: course 102 (enforced), Mathematics 32B, 33B. Introduction to basic concepts of probability, including random variables and vectors, distributions and densities, moments, characteristic functions, and limit theorems. Applications to communication, control, and signal processing. Introduction to computer simulation and generation of random events. Letter grading.

  • 131B. Introduction to Stochastic Processes

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 131B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 131A. Introduction to concepts of stochastic processes, emphasizing continuous- and discrete-time stationary processes, correlation function and spectral density, linear transformation, and mean-square estimation. Applications to communication, control, and signal processing. Introduction to computer simulation and analysis of stochastic processes. Letter grading.

  • 132A. Introduction to Communication Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 132A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: courses 102, 113, 131A. Review of basic probability, basics of hypothesis testing, sufficient statistics and waveform communication, signal-design tradeoffs for digital communications, basics of error control coding, intersymbol interference channels and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), basics of wireless communications. Letter grading.

  • 132B. Data Communications and Telecommunication Networks

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 132B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 131A. Layered communications architectures. Queueing system modeling and analysis. Error control, flow and congestion control. Packet switching, circuit switching, and routing. Network performance analysis and design. Multiple-access communications: TDMA, FDMA, polling, random access. Local, metropolitan, wide area, integrated services networks. Letter grading.

  • 133A. Applied Numerical Computing

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 133A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: course 131A, and Civil Engineering M20 or Computer Science 31 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M20. Introduction to numerical computing/analysis; analytic formulations versus numerical solutions; floating-point representations and rounding errors. Review of MATLAB; mathematical software. Linear equations; LU factorization; bounds on error; iterative methods for solving linear equations; conditioning and stability; complexity. Interpolation and approximation; splines. Zeros and roots of nonlinear equations. Linear least squares and orthogonal (QR) factorization; statistical interpretation. Numerical optimization; Newton method; nonlinear least squares. Numerical quadrature. Solving ordinary differential equations. Eigenvalues and singular values; QR algorithm; statistical applications. Letter grading.

  • 133B. Simulation, Optimization, and Data Analysis

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 133B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 133A. Simulation of dynamical systems. Algorithms for ordinary differential and difference equations. Fourier analysis; fast Fourier transforms. Random number generators. Simulation of stochastic systems, Monte Carlo methods. Constrained optimization; applications of optimization to engineering design, modeling, and data analysis. Introduction to data mining and machine learning. Algorithms and complexity. Integration of mathematical software in applications. Letter grading.

  • 134. Graph Theory in Engineering

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 134.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Basics of graph theory, including trees, bipartite graphs and matching, vertex and edge coloring, planar graphs and networks. Emphasis on reducing real-world engineering problems to graph theory formulations. Letter grading.

  • 141. Principles of Feedback Control

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 141.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 102. Mathematical modeling of physical control systems in form of differential equations and transfer functions. Design problems, system performance indices of feedback control systems via classical techniques, root-locus and frequency-domain methods. Computer-aided solution of design problems from real world. Letter grading.

  • 142. Linear Systems: State-Space Approach

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 142.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 102. State-space methods of linear system analysis and synthesis, with application to problems in networks, control, and system modeling. Letter grading.

  • M146. Introduction to Machine Learning

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M146.) (Same as Computer Science M146.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course 131A or Civil and Environmental Engineering 110 or Mathematics 170A or Statistics 100A, Computer Science 33. Introduction to breadth of data science. Foundations for modeling data sources, principles of operation of common tools for data analysis, and application of tools and models to data gathering and analysis. Topics include statistical foundations, regression, classification, kernel methods, clustering, expectation maximization, principal component analysis, decision theory, reinforcement learning and deep learning. Letter grading.

  • M153. Introduction to Microscale and Nanoscale Manufacturing

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M153.) (Same as Bioengineering M153, Chemical Engineering M153, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M183B.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, five hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 20A, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Introduction to general manufacturing methods, mechanisms, constrains, and microfabrication and nanofabrication. Focus on concepts, physics, and instruments of various microfabrication and nanofabrication techniques that have been broadly applied in industry and academia, including various photolithography technologies, physical and chemical deposition methods, and physical and chemical etching methods. Hands-on experience for fabricating microstructures and nanostructures in modern cleanroom environment. Letter grading.

  • 162A. Wireless Communication Links and Antennas

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 162A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisite: course 101B. Basic properties of transmitting and receiving antennas and antenna arrays. Array synthesis. Adaptive arrays. Friis transmission formula, radar equations. Cell-site and mobile antennas, bandwidth budget. Noise in communication systems (transmission lines, antennas, atmospheric, etc.). Cell-site and mobile antennas, cell coverage for signal and traffic, interference, multipath fading, ray bending, and other propagation phenomena. Letter grading.

  • 163A. Introductory Microwave Circuits

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 163A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 101B. Transmission lines description of waveguides, impedance matching techniques, power dividers, directional couplers, active devices, transistor amplifier design. Letter grading.

  • 163C. Introduction to Microwave Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 163C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 101B. Theory and design of modern microwave systems such as satellite communication systems, radar systems, wireless sensors, and biological applications of microwaves. Letter grading.

  • 163DA. Microwave and Wireless Design I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 163DA.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 101A, 101B. Course 163DA is enforced requisite to 163DB. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Capstone design course, with emphasis on transmission line-based circuits and components to address need in industry and research community for students with microwave and wireless circuit design experiences. Standard design procedure for waveguide and transmission line-based microwave circuits and systems to gain experience in using Microwave CAD software such as Agilent ADS or HFSS. How to fabricate and test these designs, In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 163DB).

  • 163DB. Microwave and Wireless Design II

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 163DB.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 101A, 101B, 163DA. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Design of radio frequency circuits and systems, with emphasis on both theoretical foundations and hands-on experience. Design of radio frequency transceivers and their building blocks according to given specifications or in form of open-ended problems. Introduction to advanced topics related to projects through lecture and laboratories. Creation by students of end-to-end systems in application context, managing trade-offs across subsystems while meeting constraints and optimizing metrics related to cost, performance, ease of use, manufacturability, testing, and other real-world issues. Oral and written presentations of project results required. Letter grading.

  • 164DA. Radio Frequency Design Project I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 164DA.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 115B. Course 164DA is enforced requisite to 164DB. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Design of radio frequency circuits and systems, with emphasis on both theoretical foundations and hands-on experience. Design of radio frequency transceivers and their building blocks according to given specifications or in form of open-ended problems. Introduction to advanced topics related to projects through lecture and laboratories. Creation by students of end-to-end systems in application context, managing trade-offs across subsystems while meeting constraints and optimizing metrics related to cost, performance, ease of use, manufacturability, testing, and other real-world issues. Oral and written presentations of project results required. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 164DB).

  • 164DB. Radio Frequency Design Project II

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 164DB.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 164DA. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Design of radio frequency circuits and systems, with emphasis on both theoretical foundations and hands-on experience. Design of radio frequency transceivers and their building blocks according to given specifications or in form of open-ended problems. Introduction to advanced topics related to projects through lecture and laboratories. Creation by students of end-to-end systems in application context, managing trade-offs across subsystems while meeting constraints and optimizing metrics related to cost, performance, ease of use, manufacturability, testing, and other real-world issues. Oral and written presentations of project results required. Letter grading.

  • 170A. Principles of Photonics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 170A.) Lecture, four hours; recitation, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: courses 2, 101A. Development of solid foundation on essential principles of photonics from ground up with minimum prior knowledge on this subject. Topics include optical properties of materials, optical wave propagation and modes, optical interferometers and resonators, optical coupling and modulation, optical absorption and emission, principles of lasers and light-emitting diodes, and optical detection. Letter grading.

  • 170B. Photonic Devices and Circuits

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 170B.) Lecture, four hours; recitation, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 170A. Coverage of core knowledge of practical photonic devices and circuits. Topics include optical waveguides, optical fibers, optical couplers, optical modulators, lasers and light-emitting diodes, optical detectors, and integrated photonic devices and circuits. Letter grading.

  • 170C. Photonic Sensors and Solar Cells

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 170C.) Lecture, four hours; recitation, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 101A. Recommended: courses 2, 170A. Fundamentals of detection of light for communication and sensing, as well as conversion of light to electrical energy in solar cells. Introduction to radiometry, semiconductor photodetectors, noise processes and figures of merit, thermal detectors, and photovoltaic solar cells of various types and materials. Letter grading.

  • M171L. Data Communication Systems Laboratory

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M171L.) (Same as Computer Science M171L.) Laboratory, four to eight hours; outside study, two to four hours. Recommended preparation: course M116L. Limited to seniors. Not open to students with credit for course M117. Interpretation of analog-signaling aspects of digital systems and data communications through experience in using contemporary test instruments to generate and display signals in relevant laboratory setups. Use of oscilloscopes, pulse and function generators, baseband spectrum analyzers, desktop computers, terminals, modems, PCs, and workstations in experiments on pulse transmission impairments, waveforms and their spectra, modem and terminal characteristics, and interfaces. Letter grading.

  • 173DA. Photonics and Communication Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 173DA.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 101A. Recommended: course 170A or Bioengineering C170. Introduction to measurement of basic photonic devices, including LEDs, lasers, detectors, and amplifiers; fiber-optic fundamentals and measurement of fiber systems. Modulation techniques, including A.M., F.M., phase and suppressed carrier methods. Possible projects include lasers, optical communication, and biomedical imaging and sensing. Choice of project preliminary design. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 173DB).

  • 173DB. Photonics and Communication Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 173DB.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisites: courses 101A, 173DA. Introduction to measurement of basic photonic devices, including LEDs, lasers, detectors, and amplifiers; fiber-optic fundamentals and measurement of fiber systems. Modulation techniques, including A.M., F.M., phase and suppressed carrier methods. Possible projects include lasers, optical communication, and biomedical imaging and sensing. Finalization of design and testing of projects begun in course 173DA. Letter grading.

  • 176. Photonics in Biomedical Applications

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 176.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 101A. Study of different types of optical systems and their physics background. Examination of their roles in current and projected biomedical applications. Specific capabilities of photonics to be related to each example. Letter grading.

  • 180DA. Systems Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 180DA.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, six hours. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Advanced systems design integrating communications, control, and signal processing subsystems. Introduction to advanced topics related to projects through lecture and laboratories. Open-ended projects vary each offering. Student teams create high-performance designs that manage trade-offs among subsystem components, including cost, performance, ease of use, and other real-world constraints. Oral and written presentation of project results. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 180DB).

  • 180DB. Systems Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 180DB.) Laboratory, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 180DA. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Advanced systems design integrating communications, control, and signal processing subsystems. Introduction to advanced topics related to projects through lecture and laboratories. Open-ended projects vary each offering. Student teams create high-performance designs that manage trade-offs among subsystem components, including cost, performance, ease of use, and other real-world constraints. Oral and written presentation of project results. Completion of projects begun in course 180DA. Letter grading.

  • CM182. Science, Technology, and Public Policy

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering CM182.) (Same as Public Policy CM182.) Lecture, three hours. Recent and continuing advances in science and technology are raising profoundly important public policy issues. Consideration of selection of critical policy issues, each of which has substantial ethical, social, economic, political, scientific, and technological aspects. Concurrently scheduled with course CM282. Letter grading.

  • 183DA. Design of Robotic Systems I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 183DA.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 102. Recommended: courses 141, 142. Course 183DA is requisite to 183DB. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Topics in robotic design include integrated electromechanical design, design for manufacturing (DFM), design software, and design automation. Topics in robotic manufacturing include materials, sensors and actuators, programming, and rapid prototyping. Topics in control include manipulation, motion and path planning, learning and adaptation, and human-robot interaction. Additional topics may include distributed and multi-robot systems, bio-inspired robotics, project management, and societal implications. Open-ended projects vary annually. Student teams create and analyze robotic systems for various applications. Oral and written presentation of project results. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 183DB).

  • 183DB. Design of Robotic Systems II

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 183DB.) Laboratory, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 183DA. Recommended: courses 141, 142. Limited to senior Electrical Engineering majors. Topics in robotic design include integrated electromechanical design, design for manufacturing (DFM), design software, and design automation. Topics in robotic manufacturing include materials, sensors and actuators, programming, and rapid prototyping. Topics in control include manipulation, motion and path planning, learning and adaptation, and human-robot interaction. Additional topics may include distributed and multi-robot systems, bio-inspired robotics, project management, and societal implications. Open-ended projects vary annually. Student teams create and analyze robotic systems for various applications. Oral and written presentation of project results. Letter grading.

  • 184DA. Independent Group Project Design

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 184DA.) Laboratory, five hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses M16, 110, 110L. Course 184DA is enforced requisite to 184DB. Courses centered on group project that runs year long to give students intensive experience on hardware design, microcontroller programming, and project coordination. Several projects based on autonomous robots that traverse small mazes and courses offered yearly and target regional competitions. Students may submit proposals that are evaluated and approved by faculty members. Topics include sensing circuits and amplifier-based design, microcontroller programming, feedback control, actuation, and motor control. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 184DB).

  • 184DB. Independent Group Project Design

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 184DB.) Laboratory, five hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: courses M16, 110, 110L, 184DA. Courses centered on group project that runs year long to give students intensive experience on hardware design, microcontroller programming, and project coordination. Several projects based on autonomous robots that traverse small mazes and courses offered yearly and target regional competitions. Students may submit proposals that are evaluated and approved by faculty members. Topics include sensing circuits and amplifier-based design, microcontroller programming, feedback control, actuation, and motor control. Letter grading.

  • M185. Introduction to Plasma Electronics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M185.) (Same as Physics M122.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 101A or Physics 110A. Senior-level introductory course on electrodynamics of ionized gases and applications to materials processing, generation of coherent radiation and particle beams, and renewable energy sources. Letter grading.

  • 188. Special Courses in Electrical Engineering

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 188.) Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Special topics in electrical engineering for undergraduate students taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 194. Research Group Seminars: Electrical Engineering

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 194.) Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for undergraduate students who are part of research group. Discussion of research methods and current literature in field. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research in Electrical Engineering

    Units: 2 to 8

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 199.) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit with school approval. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Academic and Student Affairs. Letter grading.

  • 201A. VLSI Design Automation

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 201A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 115C. Fundamentals of design automation of VLSI circuits and systems, including introduction to circuit and system platforms such as field programmable gate arrays and multicore systems; high-level synthesis, logic synthesis, and technology mapping; physical design; and testing and verification. Letter grading.

  • 201C. Modeling of VLSI Circuits and Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 201C.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 115C. Detailed study of VLSI circuit and system models considering performance, signal integrity, power and thermal effects, reliability, and manufacturability. Discussion of principles of modeling and optimization codevelopment. Letter grading.

  • 201D. Design in Nanoscale Technologies

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 201D.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 115C. Challenges of digital circuit design and layout in deeply scaled technologies, with focus on design-manufacturing interactions. Summary of large-scale digital design flow; basic manufacturing flow; lithographic patterning, resolution enhancement, and mask preparation; yield and variation modeling; circuit reliability and aging issues; design rules and their origins; layout design for manufacturing; test structures and process control; circuit ans architecture methods for variability mitigation. Letter grading.

  • M202A. Embedded Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M202A.) (Same as Computer Science M213A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate computer science and electrical engineering students. Methodologies and technologies for design of embedded systems. Topics include hardware and software platforms for embedded systems, techniques for modeling and specification of system behavior, software organization, real-time operating system scheduling, real-time communication and packet scheduling, low-power battery and energy-aware system design, timing synchronization, fault tolerance and debugging, and techniques for hardware and software architecture optimization. Theoretical foundations as well as practical design methods. Letter grading.

  • M202B. Energy-Aware Computing and Cyber-Physical Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M202B.) (Same as Computer Science M213B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M16 or Computer Science M51A. Recommended: course M116C or Computer Science M151B, and Computer Science 111. System-level management and cross-layer methods for power and energy consumption in computing and communication at various scales ranging across embedded, mobile, personal, enterprise, and data-center scale. Computing, networking, sensing, and control technologies and algorithms for improving energy sustainability in human-cyber-physical systems. Topics include modeling of energy consumption, energy sources, and energy storage; dynamic power management; power-performance scaling and energy proportionality; duty-cycling; power-aware scheduling; low-power protocols; battery modeling and management; thermal management; sensing of power consumption. Letter grading.

  • 202C. Networked Embedded Systems Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 202C.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Designed for graduate computer science and electrical engineering students. Training in combination of networked embedded systems design combining embedded hardware platform, embedded operating system, and hardware/software interface. Essential graduate student background for research and industry career paths in wireless devices for applications ranging from conventional wireless mobile devices to new area of wireless health. Laboratory design modules and course projects based on state-of-art embedded hardware platform. Letter grading.

  • 205A. Matrix Analysis for Scientists and Engineers

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 205A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Preparation: one undergraduate linear algebra course. Designed for first-year graduate students in all branches of engineering, science, and related disciplines. Introduction to matrix theory and linear algebra, language in which virtually all of modern science and engineering is conducted. Review of matrices taught in undergraduate courses and introduction to graduate-level topics. Letter grading.

  • M206. Machine Perception

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M206.) (Same as Computer Science M268.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Designed for graduate students. Computational aspects of processing visual and other sensory information. Unified treatment of early vision in man and machine. Integration of symbolic and iconic representations in process of image segmentation. Computing multimodal sensory information by neural-net architectures. Letter grading.

  • 208A. Analytical Methods of Engineering I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 208A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Limited to graduate students. Application of techniques of linear algebra to engineering problems. Vector spaces: scalar products, Cauchy/Schwarz inequality. Gram/Schmidt orthogonalization. Matrices as linear transformations: eigenvalues and spectrum. Self-adjoint and covariance matrices. Square root and factorization, Cholesky decomposition. Determinants, Cayley/Hamilton theorem. Minimal polynomials, Bezout theorem. Polar and singular value decomposition. Sequences, convergence, and matrix exponential. Applications to problems in signal processing, communications, and control. Letter grading.

  • M208B. Functional Analysis for Applied Mathematics and Engineering

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M208B.) (Same as Mathematics M268A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course 208A (or Mathematics 115A and 115B), Mathematics 131A, 131B, 132. Topics may include L^{p} spaces, Hilbert, Banach, and separable spaces; Fourier transforms; linear functionals. Riesz representation theory, linear operators and their adjoints; self-adjoint and compact operators. Spectral theory. Differential operators such as Laplacian and eigenvalue problems. Resolvent distributions and Green's functions. Semigroups. Applications. S/U or letter grading.

  • M208C. Topics in Functional Analysis for Applied Mathematics and Engineering

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M208C.) (Same as Mathematics M268B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M208B. Semigroups of linear operators over Hilbert spaces; generator and resolvent, generation theorems, Laplace inversion formula. Dissipative operators and contraction semigroups. Analytic semigroups and spectral representation. Semigroups with compact resolvents. Parabolic and hyperbolic systems. Controllability and stabilizability. Spectral theory of differential operators, PDEs, generalized functions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209AS. Special Topics in Circuits and Embedded Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 209AS.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of circuits and embedded systems, such as digital, analog, mixed-signal, and radio frequency integrated circuits (RF ICs); electronic design automation; wireless communication circuits and systems; embedded processor architectures; embedded software; distributed sensor and actuator networks; robotics; and embedded security. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 209BS. Seminar: Circuits and Embedded Systems

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 209BS.) Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of circuits and embedded systems, such as digital, analog, mixed-signal, and radio frequency integrated circuits (RF ICs); electronic design automation; wireless communication circuits and systems; embedded processor architectures; embedded software; distributed sensor and actuator networks; robotics; and embedded security. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

  • 210A. Adaptation and Learning

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 210A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Preparation: prior training in probability theory, random processes, and linear algebra. Recommended requisites: courses 205A, 241A. Mean-square-error estimation and filters, least-squares estimation and filters, steepest-descent algorithms, stochastic-gradient algorithms, convergence, stability, tracking, and performance, algorithms for adaptation and learning, adaptive filters, learning and classification, optimization. Letter grading.

  • 210B. Inference over Networks

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 210B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Preparation: prior training in probability theory, random processes, linear algebra, and adaptation. Enforced requisite: course 210A. Adaptation, learning, estimation, and detection over networks. Steepest-descent algorithms, stochastic-gradient algorithms, convergence, stability, tracking, and performance analyses. Distributed optimization. Online and distributed adaptation and learning. Synchronous and asynchronous network behavior. Incremental, consensus, diffusion, and gossip strategies. Letter grading.

  • 211A. Digital Image Processing I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 211A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Preparation: computer programming experience. Requisite: course 113. Fundamentals of digital image processing theory and techniques. Topics include two-dimensional linear system theory, image transforms, and enhancement. Concepts covered in lecture applied in computer laboratory assignments. Letter grading.

  • 212A. Theory and Design of Digital Filters

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 212A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 113. Approximation of filter specifications. Use of design charts. Structures for recursive digital filters. FIR filter design techniques. Comparison of IIR and FIR structures. Implementation of digital filters. Limit cycles. Overflow oscillations. Discrete random signals. Wave digital filters. Letter grading.

  • 212B. Multirate Systems and Filter Banks

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 212B.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 212A. Fundamentals of multirate systems; polyphase representation; multistage implementations; applications of multirate systems; maximally decimated filter banks; perfect reconstruction systems; paraunitary filter banks; wavelet transform and its relation to multirate filter banks. Letter grading.

  • 213A. Advanced Digital Signal Processing Circuit Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 213A.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 212A. Digital filter design and optimization tools, architectures for digital signal processing circuits; integrated circuit modules for digital signal processing; programmable signal processors; CAD tools and cell libraries for application-specific integrated circuit design; case studies of speech and image processing circuits. Letter grading.

  • M214A. Digital Speech Processing

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M214A.) (Same as Bioengineering M214A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 113. Theory and applications of digital processing of speech signals. Mathematical models of human speech production and perception mechanisms, speech analysis/synthesis. Techniques include linear prediction, filter-bank models, and homomorphic filtering. Applications to speech synthesis, automatic recognition, and hearing aids. Letter grading.

  • 214B. Advanced Topics in Speech Processing

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 214B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; computer assignments, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course M214A. Advanced techniques used in various speech-processing applications, with focus on speech recognition by humans and machine. Physiology and psychoacoustics of human perception. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) and Hidden Markov Models (HMM) for automatic speech recognition systems, pattern classification, and search algorithms. Aids for hearing impaired. Letter grading.

  • 215A. Analog Integrated Circuit Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 215A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 115B. Analysis and design of analog integrated circuits. MOS and bipolar device structures and models, single-stage and differential amplifiers, noise, feedback, operational amplifiers, offset and distortion, sampling devices and discrete-time circuits, bandgap references. Letter grading.

  • 215B. Advanced Digital Integrated Circuits

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 215B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 115C, M216A. Analysis and comparison of modern logic families. VLSI memories (SRAM, DRAM, and ROMs). Accuracy of various simulation models and simulation methods for digital circuits. Letter grading.

  • 215C. Analysis and Design of RF Circuits and Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 215C.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 215A. Principles of RF circuit and system design, with emphasis on monolithic implementation in VLSI technologies. Basic concepts, communications background, transceiver architectures, low-noise amplifiers and mixers, oscillators, frequency synthesizers, power amplifiers. Letter grading.

  • 215D. Analog Microsystem Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 215D.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 215A. Analysis and design of data conversion interfaces and filters. Sampling circuits and architectures, D/A conversion techniques, A/D converter architectures, building blocks, precision techniques, discrete- and continuous-time filters. Letter grading.

  • 215E. Signaling and Synchronization

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 215E.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 215A, M216A. Analysis and design of circuits for synchronization and communication for VLSI systems. Use of both digital and analog design techniques to improve data rate of electronics between functional blocks, chips, and systems. Advanced clocking methodologies, phase-locked loop design for clock generation, and high-performance wire-line transmitters, receivers, and timing recovery circuits. Letter grading.

  • M216A. Design of VLSI Circuits and Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M216A.) (Same as Computer Science M258A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Requisites: courses M16 or Computer Science M51A, and 115A. Recommended: course 115C. LSI/VLSI design and application in computer systems. Fundamental design techniques that can be used to implement complex integrated systems on chips. Letter grading.

  • 216B. VLSI Signal Processing

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 216B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Advanced concepts in VLSI signal processing, with emphasis on architecture design and optimization within block-based description that can be mapped to hardware. Fundamental concepts from digital signal processing (DSP) theory, architecture, and circuit design applied to complex DSP algorithms in emerging applications for personal communications and healthcare. Letter grading.

  • M216C. LSI in Computer System Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M216C.) (Same as Computer Science M258C.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: course M216A. LSI/VLSI design and application in computer systems. In-depth studies of VLSI architectures and VLSI design tools. Letter grading.

  • M217. Biomedical Imaging

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M217.) (Same as Bioengineering M217.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course 114 or 211A. Optical imaging modalities in biomedicine. Other nonoptical imaging modalities discussed briefly for comparison purposes. Letter grading.

  • 218. Network Economics and Game Theory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 218.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Discussion of how different cooperative and noncooperative games among agents can be constructed to model, analyze, optimize, and shape emerging interactions among users in different networks and system settings. How strategic agents can successfully compete with each other for limited and time-varying resources by optimizing their decision process and learning from their past interaction with other agents. To determine their optimal actions in these distributed, informationally decentralized environments, agents need to learn and model directly or implicitly other agents' responses to their actions. Discussion of existing multiagent learning techniques and learning in games, including adjustment processes for learning equilibria, fictitious play, regret-learning, and more. Letter grading.

  • 219. Large-Scale Data Mining: Models and Algorithms

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 219.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Introduction of variety of scalable data modeling tools, both predictive and causal, from different disciplines. Topics include supervised and unsupervised data modeling tools from machine learning, such as support vector machines, different regression engines, different types of regularization and kernel techniques, deep learning, and Bayesian graphical models. Emphasis on techniques to evaluate relative performance of different methods and their applicability. Includes computer projects that explore entire data analysis and modeling cycle: collecting and cleaning large-scale data, deriving predictive and causal models, and evaluating performance of different models. Letter grading.

  • 221A. Physics of Semiconductor Devices I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 221A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Physical principles and design considerations of junction devices. Letter grading.

  • 221B. Physics of Semiconductor Devices II

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 221B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Principles and design considerations of field effect devices and charge-coupled devices. Letter grading.

  • 221C. Microwave Semiconductor Devices

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 221C.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Physical principles and design considerations of microwave solid-state devices: Schottky barrier mixer diodes, IMPATT diodes, transferred electron devices, tunnel diodes, microwave transistors. Letter grading.

  • 222. Integrated Circuits Fabrication Processes

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 222.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 2. Principles of integrated circuits fabrication processes. Technological limitations of integrated circuits design. Topics include bulk crystal and epitaxial growth, thermal oxidation, diffusion, ion-implantation, chemical vapor deposition, dry etching, lithography, and metallization. Introduction of advanced process simulation tools. Letter grading.

  • 223. Solid-State Electronics I

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 223.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Recommended requisite: course 270. Energy band theory, electronic band structure of various elementary, compound, and alloy semiconductors, defects in semiconductors. Recombination mechanisms, transport properties. Letter grading.

  • 224. Solid-State Electronics II

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 224.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 223. Techniques to solve Boltzmann transport equation, various scattering mechanisms in semiconductors, high field transport properties in semiconductors, Monte Carlo method in transport. Optical properties. Letter grading.

  • 225. Physics of Semiconductor Nanostructures and Devices

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 225.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 223. Theoretical methods for circulating electronics and optical properties of semiconductor structures. Quantum size effects and low-dimensional systems. Application to semiconductor nanometer scale devices, including negative resistance diodes, transistors, and detectors. Letter grading.

  • 229. Seminar: Advanced Topics in Solid-State Electronics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 229.) Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 223, 224. Current research areas, such as radiation effects in semiconductor devices, diffusion in semiconductors, optical and microwave semiconductor devices, nonlinear optics, and electron emission. Letter grading.

  • 229S. Advanced Electrical Engineering Seminar

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 229S.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, six hours. Preparation: successful completion of Ph.D. major field examination. Seminar on current research topics in solid-state and quantum electronics (Section 1) or in electronic circuit theory and applications (Section 2). Students report on tutorial topic and on research topic in their dissertation area. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 230A. Detection and Estimation in Communication

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 230A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 131A. Applications of estimation and detection concepts in communication and signal processing; random signal and noise characterizations by analysis and simulations; mean square (MS) and maximum likelihood (ML) estimations and algorithms; detection under ML, Bayes, and Neyman/Pearson (NP) criteria; signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and error probability evaluations. Introduction to Monte Carlo simulations. Letter grading.

  • 230B. Digital Communication Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 230B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 132A, 230A. Principles and practical techniques for communication at physical and multiple access layers. Review of communications over Gaussian channel. Synchronization and adaptive equalization. Nonlinear impairments in radio transceivers. Wireless channel models, diversity techniques, and link budgets. Modulations for wireless channels. Multi-antenna methods. Wireless multiple access and resource allocation techniques. Scalable approaches to meeting wireless data rate demand. Letter grading.

  • 230C. Signal Processing in Communications

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 230C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 230A. Concepts and implementations of signal processing in communication and signal processing systems. Spectral analysis using Fourier transform and windowing, parametric modeling, eigen-decomposition methods, time-frequency analysis, wavelet transform, and sub-band processing. Array processing using beamforming for SNIR enhancement, smart antenna, and source separation and localization. Introduction to compressive sampling and applications. Letter grading.

  • 230D. Algorithms and Processing in Communication Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 230D.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 131A, 230A. Review of computational linear algebra methods on QRD, eigen- and singular-value decompositions, and LS estimation with applications to estimation and detection in communication, radar, speech, image, and array processing systems. Systolic and parallel algorithms and VLSI architectures for high performance and high throughput real-time estimation, detection, decoding, and beamforming applications. Letter grading.

  • 231A. Information Theory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 231A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 131A. Fundamentals information compression, transmission, processing, and learning. Topics include limits and algorithms for lossless data compression, connections to model estimation and learning, channel capacity, rate versus distortion in lossy compression, and basics of information theory for networks. Letter grading.

  • 231B. Network Information Theory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 231B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 231A. Point-to-point multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) wireless channels: capacity and outage; single-hop networks: multiple access, broadcast, interference, and relay channels; channels and sources with side-information; basics of multiterminal lossy data compression; basics of network information flow over general noisy networks. Letter grading.

  • 231E. Channel Coding Theory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 231E.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Fundamentals of error control codes and decoding algorithms. Topics include block codes, convolutional codes, trellis codes, and turbo codes. Letter grading.

  • 232A. Stochastic Modeling with Applications to Telecommunication Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 232A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Stochastic processes as applied to study of telecommunication systems, traffic engineering, business, and management. Discrete-time and continuous-time Markov chain processes. Renewal processes, regenerative processes, Markov-renewal, semi-Markov and semiregenerative stochastic processes. Decision and reward processes. Applications to traffic and queueing analysis of basic telecommunications and computer communication networks, Internet, and management systems. Letter grading.

  • 232B. Telecommunication Switching and Queueing Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 232B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A. Modeling, analysis, and design of queueing systems with applications to switching systems, communications networks, wireless systems and networks, and business and management systems. Modeling, analysis, and design of Markovian and non-Markovian queueing systems. Priority service systems. Queueing networks with applications to computer communications, Internet, and management networks. Letter grading.

  • 232C. Telecommunication Architecture and Networks

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 232C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 232B. Analysis and design of integrated-service telecommunication networks and multiple-access procedures. Stochastic analysis of priority-based queueing system models. Queueing networks; network protocol architectures; error control; routing, flow, and access control. Applications to local-area, packet-radio, satellite, and computer communication networks. Letter grading.

  • 232D. Communications Networking and Traffic Management for Autonomous Mobile Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 232D.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 131A or equivalent. Analysis, design, and traffic management of autonomous mobile systems. Telecommunication networks, mobile wireless networks, and multiple-access communication systems. Networking architectures, multiple-access communications under adaptive quality-of-service metrics. Switching, routing, networking protocols, and Internet. Autonomous mobile networked systems. Cellular wireless networks, WiFi mesh networks, peer-to-peer mobile ad hoc wireless networks. Autonomous transportation networked systems. Traffic management architectures in support of self-driving cars. Smart grid networks. Adaptive multimedia streaming over mobile wireless networks. Embedded sensor networks. Energy and pollution aware sustainable networking. Security mechanisms. Letter grading.

  • 232E. Graphs and Network Flows

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 232E.) Lecture, four hours; recitation, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Solution to analysis and synthesis problems that may be formulated as flow problems in capacity constrained (or cost constrained) networks. Development of tools of network flow theory using graph theoretic methods; application to communication, transportation, and transmission problems. Letter grading.

  • 233. Wireless Communications System Design, Modeling, and Implementation

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 113. Covers algorithms, architectures, and implementation for radio transceivers, physical, and network layer functionalities. Topics include wireless channel modeling, single-carrier and multi-carrier systems, multiple antenna systems, radio impairments and their correction, architectures and circuits design trade-offs, wideband spectrum sensing, wideband signaling, cognitive radio, massive multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) systems, and applications in 5G and Internet of things (IoT) communication. Letter grading.

  • 234A. Network Coding Theory and Applications

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 234A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Algebraic approach and main theorem in network coding, combinatorial approach and alphabet size, linear programming approach and throughput benefits, network code design algorithms, secure network coding, network coding for wireless, other applications. Letter grading.

  • 235A. Mathematical Foundations of Data Storage Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 235A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 131A or equivalent. Research developments in new mathematical techniques for emerging large-scale, ultra-reliable, fast, and affordable data storage systems. Topics include, but are not limited to, graph-based codes and algebraic codes and decoders for modern storage devices (e.g., Flash), rank modulation, rewriting codes, algorithms for data deduplication and synchronization, and redundant array of independent disks (RAID) systems. Letter grading.

  • 236A. Linear Programming

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 236A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Mathematics 115A or equivalent knowledge of linear algebra. Basic graduate course in linear optimization. Geometry of linear programming. Duality. Simplex method. Interior-point methods. Decomposition and large-scale linear programming. Quadratic programming and complementary pivot theory. Engineering applications. Introduction to integer linear programming and computational complexity theory. Letter grading.

  • 236B. Convex Optimization

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 236B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 236A. Introduction to convex optimization and its applications. Convex sets, functions, and basics of convex analysis. Convex optimization problems (linear and quadratic programming, second-order cone and semidefinite programming, geometric programming). Lagrange duality and optimality conditions. Applications of convex optimization. Unconstrained minimization methods. Interior-point and cutting-plane algorithms. Introduction to nonlinear programming. Letter grading.

  • 236C. Optimization Methods for Large-Scale Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 236C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 236B. First-order algorithms for convex optimization: subgradient method, conjugate gradient method, proximal gradient and accelerated proximal gradient methods, block coordinate descent. Decomposition of large-scale optimization problems. Augmented Lagrangian method and alternating direction method of multipliers. Monotone operators and operator-splitting algorithms. Second-order algorithms: inexact Newton methods, interior-point algorithms for conic optimization. Letter grading.

  • M237. Dynamic Programming

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M237.) (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M276.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended requisite: course 232A or 236A or 236B. Introduction to mathematical analysis of sequential decision processes. Finite horizon model in both deterministic and stochastic cases. Finite-state infinite horizon model. Methods of solution. Examples from inventory theory, finance, optimal control and estimation, Markov decision processes, combinatorial optimization, communications. Letter grading.

  • 238. Multimedia Communications and Processing

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 238.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 113, 131A. Key concepts, principles, and algorithms of real-time multimedia communications and processing across heterogeneous Internet and wireless channels. Due to flexible and low-cost infrastructure, new networks and communication channels enable variety of delay-sensitive multimedia transmission applications and provide varying resources with limited support for quality of service required by delay-sensitive, bandwidth-intense, and loss-tolerant multimedia applications. New concepts, principles, theories, and practical solutions for cross-layer design that can provide optimal adaptation for time-varying channel characteristics, adaptive and delay-sensitive applications, and multiuser transmission environments. Discussion of online learning and learning how to make decisions in broad context, including Markov decision processes, optimal stopping, reinforcement learning, structural results for online learning, multiarmed bandits learning, multiarmed bandits learning, multiagent learning. Letter grading.

  • 239AS. Special Topics in Signals and Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 239AS.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of signals and systems, such as communications, control, image processing, information theory, multimedia, computer networking, optimization, speech processing, telecommunications, and VLSI signal processing. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 239BS. Seminar: Signals and Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 239BS.) Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of signals and systems, such as communications, control, image processing, information theory, multimedia, computer networking, optimization, speech processing, telecommunications, and VLSI signal processing. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

  • M240A. Linear Dynamic Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M240A.) (Same as Chemical Engineering M280A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 141 or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 171A. State-space description of linear time-invariant (LTI) and time-varying (LTV) systems in continuous and discrete time. Linear algebra concepts such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular values, Cayley/Hamilton theorem, Jordan form; solution of state equations; stability, controllability, observability, realizability, and minimality. Stabilization design via state feedback and observers; separation principle. Connections with transfer function techniques. Letter grading.

  • 240B. Linear Optimal Control

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 240B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 141, M240A. Introduction to optimal control, with emphasis on detailed study of LQR, or linear regulators with quadratic cost criteria. Relationships to classical control system design. Letter grading.

  • M240C. Optimal Control

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M240C.) (Same as Chemical Engineering M280C and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 240B. Applications of variational methods, Pontryagin maximum principle, Hamilton/Jacobi/Bellman equation (dynamic programming) to optimal control of dynamic systems modeled by nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Letter grading.

  • 241A. Stochastic Processes

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 241A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 131A. Review of basic probability, axiomatic development, expectation, convergence of random processes: stationarity, power spectral density. Response of linear systems to random inputs. Basics of estimation. Special random processes, Markov processes, martingales, etc. Letter grading.

  • M242A. Nonlinear Dynamic Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M242A.) (Same as Chemical Engineering M282A and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M272A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M240A or Chemical Engineering M280A or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M270A. State-space techniques for studying solutions of time-invariant and time-varying nonlinear dynamic systems with emphasis on stability. Lyapunov theory (including converse theorems), invariance, center manifold theorem, input-to-state stability and small-gain theorem. Letter grading.

  • M248S. Seminar: Systems, Dynamics, and Control Topics

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M248S.) (Same as Chemical Engineering M297 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M299A.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, six hours. Limited to graduate engineering students. Presentations of research topics by leading academic researchers from fields of systems, dynamics, and control. Students who work in these fields present their papers and results. S/U grading.

  • M250B. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Fabrication

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M250B.) (Same as Bioengineering M250B and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M280B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course M153. Advanced discussion of micromachining processes used to construct MEMS. Coverage of many lithographic, deposition, and etching processes, as well as their combination in process integration. Materials issues such as chemical resistance, corrosion, mechanical properties, and residual/intrinsic stress. Letter grading.

  • M252. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Device Physics and Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M252.) (Same as Bioengineering M252 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M282.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to MEMS design. Design methods, design rules, sensing and actuation mechanisms, microsensors, and microactuators. Designing MEMS to be produced with both foundry and nonfoundry processes. Computer-aided design for MEMS. Design project required. Letter grading.

  • M255. Neuroengineering

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M255.) (Same as Bioengineering M260 and Neuroscience M206.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, five hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32A, Physics 1B or 6B. Introduction to principles and technologies of bioelectricity and neural signal recording, processing, and stimulation. Topics include bioelectricity, electrophysiology (action potentials, local field potentials, EEG, ECOG), intracellular and extracellular recording, microelectrode technology, neural signal processing (neural signal frequency bands, filtering, spike detection, spike sorting, stimulation artifact removal), brain-computer interfaces, deep-brain stimulation, and prosthetics. Letter grading.

  • M256A. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M256A.) (Same as Bioengineering M261A and Neuroscience M212A.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M256B. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M256B.) (Same as Bioengineering M261B and Neuroscience M212B.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M256C. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M256C.) (Same as Bioengineering M261C and Neuroscience M212C.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M257. Nanoscience and Technology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M257.) (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M287.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course CM250A. Introduction to fundamentals of nanoscale science and technology. Basic physical principles, quantum mechanics, chemical bonding and nanostructures, top-down and bottom-up (self-assembly) nanofabrication; nanocharacterization; nanomaterials, nanoelectronics, and nanobiodetection technology. Introduction to new knowledge and techniques in nano areas to understand scientific principles behind nanotechnology and inspire students to create new ideas in multidisciplinary nano areas. Letter grading.

  • 260A. Advanced Engineering Electrodynamics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 260A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 101B, 162A. Advanced treatment of concepts in electrodynamics and their applications to modern engineering problems. Vector calculus in generalized coordinate system. Solutions of wave equation and special functions. Reflection, transmission, and polarization. Vector potential, duality, reciprocity, and equivalence theorems. Scattering from cylinder, half-plane, wedge, and sphere, including radar cross-section characterization. Green's functions in electromagnetics and dyadic calculus. Letter grading.

  • 260B. Advanced Engineering Electrodynamics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 260B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101B, 162A, 260A. Advanced treatment of concepts and numerical techniques in electrodynamics and their applications to modern engineering problems. Differential geometry of curves and surfaces. Geometrical optics and geometrical theory of diffraction. Physical optics techniques. Asymptotic techniques and uniform theories. Integral equations in electromagnetics. Numerical techniques based on method of moments. Letter grading.

  • 261. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Circuits

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 261.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 163A. Rectangular and circular waveguides, microstrip, stripline, finline, and dielectric waveguide distributed circuits, with applications in microwave and millimeter wave integrated circuits. Substrate materials, surface wave phenomena. Analytical methods for discontinuity effects. Design of passive microwave and millimeter wave circuits. Letter grading.

  • 262. Antenna Theory and Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 262.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 162A. Antenna patterns. Sum and difference patterns. Optimum designs for rectangular and circular apertures. Arbitrary side lobe topography. Discrete arrays. Mutual coupling. Design of feeding networks. Letter grading.

  • 263. Reflector Antennas Synthesis, Analysis, and Measurement

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 263.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 260A, 260B. Reflector pattern analysis techniques. Single and multireflector antenna configurations. Reflector synthesis techniques. Reflector feeds. Reflector tolerance studies, including systematic and random errors. Array-fed reflector antennas. Near-field measurement techniques. Compact range concepts. Microwave diagnostic techniques. Modern satellite and ground antenna applications. Letter grading.

  • 266. Computational Methods for Electromagnetics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 266.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 162A, 163A. Computational techniques for partial differential and integral equations: finite-difference, finite-element, method of moments. Applications include transmission lines, resonators, integrated circuits, solid-state device modeling, electromagnetic scattering, and antennas. Letter grading.

  • 270. Applied Quantum Mechanics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 270.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Preparation: modern physics (or course 123A), linear algebra, and ordinary differential equations courses. Principles of quantum mechanics for applications in lasers, solid-state physics, and nonlinear optics. Topics include eigenfunction expansions, observables, Schrödinger equation, uncertainty principle, central force problems, Hilbert spaces, WKB approximation, matrix mechanics, density matrix formalism, and radiation theory. Letter grading.

  • 271. Classical Laser Theory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 271.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course 170A. Microscopic and macroscopic laser phenomena and propagation of optical pulses using classical formalism. Letter grading.

  • 272. Dynamics of Lasers

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 272.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 271. Ultrashort laser pulse characteristics, generation, and measurement. Gain switching, Q switching, cavity dumping, active and passive mode locking. Pulse compression and soliton pulse formation. Nonlinear pulse generation: soliton laser, additive-pulse mode locking, and parametric oscillators. Pulse measurement techniques. Letter grading.

  • 273. Nonlinear Photonics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 273.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course 170A. Recommended: course 271. Nonlinear optical susceptibilities. Coupled-wave and coupled-mode theories. Crystal optics, electro-optics, and magneto-optics. Nonlinear optical interactions, sum- and difference-frequency generation, harmonic and parametric generation, stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering, field-induced index changes and self-phase modulation. Nonlinear photonic devices. Nonlinear guided-wave photonics and devices. Letter grading.

  • 274. Optical Communication and Sensing Design

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 274.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisites: courses 170A and 170B or equivalent. Top-down introduction to physical layer design in fiber optic communication systems, including Telecom, Datacom, and CATV. Fundamentals of digital and analog optical communication systems, fiber transmission characteristics, and optical modulation techniques, including direct and external modulation and computer-aided design. Architectural-level design of fiber optic transceiver circuits, including preamplifier, quantizer, clock and data recovery, laser driver, and predistortion circuits. Letter grading.

  • 279AS. Special Topics in Physical and Wave Electronics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 279AS.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, on hour; outside study, seven hours. Special topics in one or more aspects of physical and wave electronics, such as electromagnetics, microwave and millimeter wave circuits, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, microelectromechanical systems, solid state, and nanotechnology. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 279BS. Seminar: Physical and Wave Electronics

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 279BS.) Seminar, two to four hours; outside study, four to eight hours. Seminars and discussions on current and advanced topics in one or more aspects of physical and wave electronics, such as electromagnetics, microwave and millimeter wave circuits, photonics and optoelectronics, plasma electronics, microelectromechanical systems, solid state, and nanotechnology. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U grading.

  • 279CS. Clean Green IGERT Brown-Bag Seminar

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 279CS.) Seminar, one hour. Required of students in Clean Energy for Green Industry (IGERT) Research. Literature seminar presented by graduate students and experts from around country who conduct research in energy harvest, storage, and conservation. S/U grading.

  • CM282. Science, Technology, and Public Policy

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering CM282.) (Same as Public Policy CM282.) Lecture, three hours. Recent and continuing advances in science and technology are raising profoundly important public policy issues. Consideration of selection of critical policy issues, each of which has substantial ethical, social, economic, political, scientific, and technological aspects. Concurrently scheduled with course CM182. Letter grading.

  • 285A. Plasma Waves and Instabilities

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 285A.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses 101A, and M185 or Physics M122. Wave phenomena in plasmas described by macroscopic fluid equations. Microwave propagation, plasma oscillations, ion acoustic waves, cyclotron waves, hydromagnetic waves, drift waves. Rayleigh/Taylor, Kelvin/Helmholtz, universal, and streaming instabilities. Application to experiments in fully and partially ionized gases. Letter grading.

  • 285B. Advanced Plasma Waves and Instabilities

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 285B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: courses M185, and 285A or Physics 222A. Interaction of intense electromagnetic waves with plasmas: waves in inhomogeneous and bounded plasmas, nonlinear wave coupling and damping, parametric instabilities, anomalous resistivity, shock waves, echoes, laser heating. Emphasis on experimental considerations and techniques. Letter grading.

  • M287. Fusion Plasma Physics and Analysis

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M287.) (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M237B.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Fundamentals of plasmas at thermonuclear burning conditions. Fokker/Planck equation and applications to heating by neutral beams, RF, and fusion reaction products. Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, and atomic radiation processes. Plasma surface interactions. Fluid description of burning plasma. Dynamics, stability, and control. Applications in tokamaks, tandem mirrors, and alternate concepts. Letter grading.

  • M293. Intellectual Property for Technology Entrepreneurs and Managers

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M293.) (Same as Management M247.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Introduction to intellectual property (IP) in context of technology products and markets. Topics include best practices to put in place before product development starts, how to develop high-value patent portfolios, patent licensing, offensive and defensive IP litigation considerations, trade secrets, opportunities and pitfalls of open source software, trademarks, managing copyright in increasingly complex content ecosystems, and adopting IP strategies to globalized marketplaces. Includes case studies inspired by complex IP questions facing technology companies today. S/U or letter grading.

  • 295. Academic Technical Writing for Electrical Engineers

    Units: 3

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 295.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for electrical engineering Ph.D. students who have completed preliminary examinations. Students read models of good writing and learn to make rhetorical observations and writing decisions, improve their academic and technical writing skills by writing and revising conference and journal papers, and practice writing for and speaking to various audiences, including potential students, engineers outside their specific fields, and nonengineers (colleagues outside field, policymakers, etc.). Students write in variety of genres, all related to their professional development as electrical engineers. Emphasis on writing as vital way to communicate precise technical and professional information in distinct contexts, directly resulting in specific outcomes. S/U grading.

  • 296. Seminar: Research Topics in Electrical Engineering

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 296.) Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in electrical engineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 297. Seminar Series: Electrical Engineering

    Units: 1

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 297.) Seminar, 90 minutes; outside study, 90 minutes. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Weekly seminars and discussion by invited speakers on research topics of heightened interest. S/U grading.

  • 298. Seminar: Engineering

    Units: 2 to 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 298.) Seminar, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Seminars may be organized in advanced technical fields. If appropriate, field trips may be arranged. May be repeated with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • 299. M.S. Project Seminar

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 299.) Seminar, to be arranged. Required of all M.S. students not in thesis option. Supervised research in small groups or individually under guidance of faculty mentor. Regular meetings, culminating report, and presentation required. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Graduate Student Affairs. S/U grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 375.) Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • M495. Teaching Preparation Seminar: Teaching and Writing Pedagogies for Electrical Engineers

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering M495.) (Same as English Composition M495K). Seminar, two hours. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Required of all departmental teaching assistants (TAs). May be taken concurrently while holding a TA appointment. Seminar on pedagogy and logistics of being a TA with emphasis on student-centered teaching, clear communication, and multimodal teaching and learning. S/U grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual or Tutorial Studies

    Units: 2 to 8

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 596.) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Petition forms to request enrollment may be obtained from assistant dean, Graduate Studies. Supervised investigation of advanced technical problems. S/U grading.

  • 597A. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination

    Units: 2 to 12

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 597A.) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Reading and preparation for M.S. comprehensive examination. S/U grading.

  • 597B. Preparation for Ph.D. Preliminary Examinations

    Units: 2 to 16

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 597B.) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. S/U grading.

  • 597C. Preparation for Ph.D. Oral Qualifying Examination

    Units: 2 to 16

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 597C.) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Preparation for oral qualifying examination, including preliminary research on dissertation. S/U grading.

  • 598. Research for and Preparation of M.S. Thesis

    Units: 2 to 12

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 598.) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Supervised independent research for M.S. candidates, including thesis prospectus. S/U grading.

  • 599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation

    Units: 2 to 16

    (Formerly numbered Electrical Engineering 599.) Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate electrical engineering students. Usually taken after students have been advanced to candidacy. S/U grading.