• 10. Introduction to Bioengineering

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, three hours. Preparation: high school biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics. Introduction to scientific and technological bases for established and emerging subfields of bioengineering, including biosensors, bioinstrumentation, and biosignal processing, biomechanics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, biotechnology, biological imaging, biomedical optics and lasers, neuroengineering, and biomolecular machines. Letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 100. Bioengineering Fundamentals

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 32A, Physics 1A. Fundamental basis for analysis and design of biological and biomedical devices and systems. Classical and statistical thermodynamic analysis of biological systems. Material, energy, charge, and force balances. Introduction to network analysis. Letter grading.

  • C101. Engineering Principles for Drug Delivery

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 33B, Physics 1B. Application of engineering principles for designing and understanding delivery of therapeutics. Discussion of physics and mathematics required for understanding colloidal stability. Analysis of concepts related to both modeling and experimentation of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking mechanisms. Analysis of diffusion of drugs, coupled with computational and engineering mathematics approaches. Concurrently scheduled with course C201. Letter grading.

  • CM102. Human Physiological Systems for Bioengineering I

    Units: 4

    (Same as Physiological Science CM102.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: human molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Not open for credit to Physiological Science majors. Broad overview of basic biological activities and organization of human body in system (organ/tissue) to system basis, with particular emphasis on molecular basis. Modeling/simulation of functional aspect of biological system included. Actual demonstration of biomedical instruments, as well as visits to biomedical facilities. Concurrently scheduled with course CM202. Letter grading.

  • CM103. Human Physiological Systems for Bioengineering II

    Units: 4

    (Same as Physiological Science CM103.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: human molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Not open for credit to Physiological Science majors. Molecular-level understanding of human anatomy and physiology in selected organ systems (digestive, skin, musculoskeletal, endocrine, immune, urinary, reproductive). System-specific modeling/simulations (immune regulation, wound healing, muscle mechanics and energetics, acid-base balance, excretion). Functional basis of biomedical instrumentation (dialysis, artificial skin, pathogen detectors, ultrasound, birth-control drug delivery). Concurrently scheduled with course CM203. Letter grading.

  • C104. Physical Chemistry of Biomacromolecules

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, 30A, Life Sciences 2, 3. To understand biological materials and design synthetic replacements, it is imperative to understand their physical chemistry. Biomacromolecules such as protein or DNA can be analyzed and characterized by applying fundamentals of polymer physical chemistry. Investigation of polymer structure and conformation, bulk and solution thermodynamics and phase behavior, polymer networks, and viscoelasticity. Application of engineering principles to problems involving biomacromolecules such as protein conformation, solvation of charged species, and separation and characterization of biomacromolecules. Concurrently scheduled with course C204. Letter grading.

  • C105. Engineering of Bioconjugates

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L. Highly recommended: one organic chemistry course. Bioconjugate chemistry is science of coupling biomolecules for wide range of applications. Oligonucleotides may be coupled to one surface in gene chip, or one protein may be coupled to one polymer to enhance its stability in serum. Wide variety of bioconjugates are used in delivery of pharmaceuticals, in sensors, in medical diagnostics, and in tissue engineering. Basic concepts of chemical ligation, including choice and design of conjugate linkers depending on type of biomolecule and desired application, such as degradable versus nondegradable linkers. Presentation and discussion of design and synthesis of synthetic bioconjugates for some sample applications. Concurrently scheduled with course C205. Letter grading.

  • C106. Topics in Bioelectricity for Bioengineers

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20B, Life Sciences 2, 3, Mathematics 33B, Physics 1C. Coverage in depth of physical processes associated with biological membranes and channel proteins, with specific emphasis on electrophysiology. Basic physical principles governing electrostatics in dielectric media, building on complexity to ultimately address action potentials and signal propagation in nerves. Topics include Nernst/Planck and Poisson/Boltzmann equations, Nernst potential, Donnan equilibrium, GHK equations, energy barriers in ion channels, cable equation, action potentials, Hodgkin/Huxley equations, impulse propagation, axon geometry and conduction, dendritic integration. Concurrently scheduled with course C206. Letter grading.

  • C107. Polymer Chemistry for Bioengineers

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course C104 or C105. Fundamental concepts of polymer synthesis, including step-growth, chain growth (ionic, radical, metal catalyzed), and ring-opening, with focus on factors that can be used to control chain length, chain length distribution, and chain-end functionality, chain copolymerization, and stereochemistry in polymerizations. Presentation of applications of use of different polymerization techniques. Concepts of step-growth, chain-growth, ring-opening, and coordination polymerization, and effects of synthesis route on polymer properties. Lectures include both theory and practical issues demonstrated through examples. Concurrently scheduled with course C207. Letter grading.

  • 110. Biotransport and Bioreaction Processes

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: course 100, Mathematics 33B. Introduction to analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, binding events, and biochemical reactions in systems of interest to bioengineers, including cells, tissues, organs, human body, extracorporeal devices, tissue engineering systems, and bioartificial organs. Introduction to pharmacokinetic analysis. Letter grading.

  • 120. Biomedical Transducers

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 30A, Electrical Engineering 100, Mathematics 32B, Physics 1C. Principles of transduction, design characteristics for different measurements, reliability and performance characteristics, and data processing and recording. Emphasis on silicon-based microfabricated and nanofabricated sensors. Novel materials, biocompatibility, biostability. Safety of electronic interfaces. Actuator design and interfacing control. Letter grading.

  • C131. Nanopore Sensing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 100, 120, Life Sciences 2, 3, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C. Analysis of sensors based on measurements of fluctuating ionic conductance through artificial or protein nanopores. Physics of pore conductance. Applications to single molecule detection and DNA sequencing. Review of current literature and technological applications. History and instrumentation of resistive pulse sensing, theory and instrumentation of electrical measurements in electrolytes, nanopore fabrication, ionic conductance through pores and GHK equation, patch clamp and single channel measurements and instrumentation, noise issues, protein engineering, molecular sensing, DNA sequencing, membrane engineering, and future directions of field. Concurrently scheduled with course C231. Letter grading.

  • C139A. Biomolecular Materials Science I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Overview of chemical and physical foundations of biomolecular materials science that concern materials aspects of molecular biology, cell biology, and bioengineering. Understanding of different types of interactions that exist between biomolecules, such as van der Waals interactions, entropically modulated electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, hydration and solvation interactions, polymer-mediated interactions, depletion interactions, molecular recognition, and others. Illustration of these ideas using examples from bioengineering and biomedical engineering. Students should be able to make simple calculations and estimates that allow them to engage broad spectrum of bioengineering problems, such as those in drug and gene delivery and tissue engineering. May be taken independently for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C239A. Letter grading.

  • C139B. Biomolecular Materials Science II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Course C139A is not requisite to C139B. Overview of chemical and physical foundations of biomolecular materials science that concern materials aspects of molecular biology, cell biology, and bioengineering. Understanding of different basic types of biomolecules, with emphasis on nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. Study of how biological and biomimetic systems organize into their functional forms via self-assembly and how these structures impart biological function. Illustration of these ideas using examples from bioengineering and biomedical engineering. Case study on current topics, including drug delivery, gene therapy, cancer therapeutics, emerging pathogens, and relation of self-assembly to disease states. May be taken independently for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C239B. Letter grading.

  • CM140. Introduction to Biomechanics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM140.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, 102, and 156A or 166A. Introduction to mechanical functions of human body; skeletal adaptations to optimize load transfer, mobility, and function. Dynamics and kinematics. Fluid mechanics applications. Heat and mass transfer. Power generation. Laboratory simulations and tests. Concurrently scheduled with course CM240. Letter grading.

  • CM141. Mechanics of Cells

    Units: 4

    (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM141.) Lecture, four hours. Introduction to physical structures of cell biology and physical principles that govern how they function mechanically. Review and application of continuum mechanics and statistical mechanics to develop quantitative mathematical models of structural mechanics in cells. Structure of macromolecules, polymers as entropic springs, random walks and diffusion, mechanosensitive proteins, single-molecule force-extension, DNA packing and transcriptional regulation, lipid bilayer membranes, mechanics of cytoskeleton, molecular motors, biological electricity, muscle mechanics, pattern formation. Concurrently scheduled with course CM241. Letter grading.

  • CM145. Molecular Biotechnology for Engineers

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemical Engineering CM145.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Life Sciences 3, 23L. Selected topics in molecular biology that form foundation of biotechnology and biomedical industry today. Topics include recombinant DNA technology, molecular research tools, manipulation of gene expression, directed mutagenesis and protein engineering, DNA-based diagnostics and DNA microarrays, antibody and protein-based diagnostics, genomics and bioinformatics, isolation of human genes, gene therapy, and tissue engineering. Concurrently scheduled with course CM245. Letter grading.

  • C147. Applied Tissue Engineering: Clinical and Industrial Perspective

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course CM102, Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, Life Sciences 1 or 2. Overview of central topics of tissue engineering, with focus on how to build artificial tissues into regulated clinically viable products. Topics include biomaterials selection, cell source, delivery methods, FDA approval processes, and physical/chemical and biological testing. Case studies include skin and artificial skin, bone and cartilage, blood vessels, neurotissue engineering, and liver, kidney, and other organs. Clinical and industrial perspectives of tissue engineering products. Manufacturing constraints, clinical limitations, and regulatory challenges in design and development of tissue-engineering devices. Concurrently scheduled with course C247. Letter grading.

  • M153. Introduction to Microscale and Nanoscale Manufacturing

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemical Engineering M153, Electrical Engineering M153, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M183B.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, five hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 20A, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Introduction to general manufacturing methods, mechanisms, constrains, and microfabrication and nanofabrication. Focus on concepts, physics, and instruments of various microfabrication and nanofabrication techniques that have been broadly applied in industry and academia, including various photolithography technologies, physical and chemical deposition methods, and physical and chemical etching methods. Hands-on experience for fabricating microstructures and nanostructures in modern cleanroom environment. Letter grading.

  • M153. Introduction to Microscale and Nanoscale Manufacturing (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemical Engineering M153, Electrical and Computer Engineering M153, and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M183B.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, four hours; outside study, five hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 20A, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C, 4AL, 4BL. Introduction to general manufacturing methods, mechanisms, constrains, and microfabrication and nanofabrication. Focus on concepts, physics, and instruments of various microfabrication and nanofabrication techniques that have been broadly applied in industry and academia, including various photolithography technologies, physical and chemical deposition methods, and physical and chemical etching methods. Hands-on experience for fabricating microstructures and nanostructures in modern cleanroom environment. Letter grading.

  • C155. Fluid-Particle and Fluid-Structure Interactions in Microflows

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 110. Introduction to Navier/Stokes equations, assumptions, and simplifications. Analytical framework for calculating simple flows and numerical methods to solve and gain intuition for complex flows. Forces on particles in Stokes flow and finite-inertia flows. Flows induced around particles with and without finite inertia and implications for particle-particle interactions. Secondary flows induced by structures and particles in confined flows. Particle separations by fluid dynamic forces: field-flow fractionation, inertial focusing, structure-induced separations. Application concepts in internal biological flows and separations for biotechnology. Helps students become sufficiently fluent with fluid mechanics vocabulary and techniques, design and model microfluidic systems to manipulate fluids, cells, and particles, and develop strong intuition for how fluid and particles behave in arbitrarily structured microchannels over range of Reynolds numbers. Concurrently scheduled with course C255. Letter grading.

  • 165EW. Bioengineering Ethics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, three hours; outside study, five hours. All professions have ethical rules that derive from moral theory. Bioethics is well-established discipline that addresses ethical problems about life, such as when do fertilized eggs become people? Should ending of life ever be assisted? At what cost should it be maintained? Unlike physicians, bioengineers do not make these decisions in practice. Engineering ethics addresses ethical problems about producing devices from molecules to bridges, such as when do concerns about risk outweigh concerns about cost? When are weapons too dangerous to design? At what point does benefit of committing to building devices outweigh need to wait for more scientific confirmation of their effectiveness? Bioengineers must be aware of consequences of applying such devices to all living systems. Emphasis on research and writing within engineering environments. Satisfies engineering writing requirement. Letter grading.

  • 167L. Bioengineering Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours; outside study, four hours. Enforced requisite: Chemistry 20L. Laboratory experiments in fluorescence microscopy, bioconjugation, soft lithography, and cell culture culminate in design of engineered surface for cell growth. Introduction to techniques used in laboratories and their underlying physical or chemical properties. Case studies connect laboratory techniques to current biomedical engineering research and reinforce experimental design skills. Letter grading.

  • C170. Energy-Tissue Interactions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Enforced requisites: Life Sciences 2, Physics 1C. Introduction to therapeutic and diagnostic use of energy delivery devices in medical and dental applications, with emphasis on understanding fundamental mechanisms underlying various types of energy-tissue interactions. Concurrently scheduled with course C270. Letter grading.

  • C170L. Introduction to Techniques in Studying Laser-Tissue Interaction

    Units: 2

    Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Corequisite: course C170. Introduction to simulation and experimental techniques used in studying laser-tissue interactions. Topics include computer simulations of light propagation in tissue, measuring absorption spectra of tissue/tissue phantoms, making tissue phantoms, determination of optical properties of different tissues, techniques of temperature distribution measurements. Concurrently scheduled with course C270L. Letter grading.

  • C171. Laser-Tissue Interaction II: Biologic Spectroscopy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course C170. Designed for physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering majors. Introduction to optical spectroscopy principles, design of spectroscopic measurement devices, optical properties of tissues, and fluorescence spectroscopy biologic media. Concurrently scheduled with course C271. Letter grading.

  • C172. Design of Minimally Invasive Surgical Tools

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 30B, Life Sciences 2, 3, Mathematics 32A. Introduction to design principles and engineering concepts used in design and manufacture of tools for minimally invasive surgery. Coverage of FDA regulatory policy and surgical procedures. Topics include optical devices, endoscopes and laparoscopes, biopsy devices, laparoscopic tools, cardiovascular and interventional radiology devices, orthopedic instrumentation, and integration of devices with therapy. Examination of complex process of tool design, fabrication, testing, and validation. Preparation of drawings and consideration of development of new and novel devices. Concurrently scheduled with course C272. Letter grading.

  • 176. Principles of Biocompatibility

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisites: course 100, Mathematics 33B, Physics 1C. Biocompatibility at systemic, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Biomechanical compatibility, stress/strain constitutive equations, cellular and molecular response to mechanical signals, biochemical and cellular compatibility, immune response. Letter grading.

  • 177A. Bioengineering Capstone Design I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours; outside study, four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 167L, 176. Lectures, seminars, and discussions on aspects of biomedical device and therapeutic design, including topics such as need finding, intellectual property, entrepreneurship, regulation, and project management. Working in teams, students develop innovative solutions to address current problems in medicine and biology. Sourcing and ordering of materials and supplies relevant to student projects. Exploration of different experimental and computational methods. Scientific presentation of progress. Letter grading.

  • 177B. Bioengineering Capstone Design II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, six hours; outside study, four hours. Enforced requisite: course 177A. Lectures, seminars, and discussions on aspects of biomedical device and therapeutic design, including meetings with scientific/clinical advisers and guest lectures from scientists in industry. Working in teams, students develop innovative solutions to address current problems in medicine and biology. Students conduct directed experiments and computational modeling, give oral presentations, write reports, and participate in bioengineering design competition. Letter grading.

  • CM178. Introduction to Biomaterials

    Units: 4

    (Same as Materials Science CM180.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, and 20L, or Materials Science 104. Engineering materials used in medicine and dentistry for repair and/or restoration of damaged natural tissues. Topics include relationships between material properties, suitability to task, surface chemistry, processing and treatment methods, and biocompatibility. Concurrently scheduled with course CM278. Letter grading.

  • C179. Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course CM178. In-depth exploration of host cellular response to biomaterials: vascular response, interface, and clotting, biocompatibility, animal models, inflammation, infection, extracellular matrix, cell adhesion, and role of mechanical forces. Concurrently scheduled with course C279. Letter grading.

  • 180. System Integration in Biology, Engineering, and Medicine I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: courses 100, 110, 120, Life Sciences 3, Physics 1C. Corequisite: course 180L. Part I of two-part series. Molecular basis of normal physiology and pathophysiology, and engineering design principles of cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Fundamental engineering principles of selected medical therapeutic devices. Letter grading.

  • 180L. System Integration in Biology, Engineering, and Medicine I Laboratory

    Units: 4

    Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours; clinical visits, four hours; outside study, three hours. Corequisite: course 180. Hands-on experimentation and clinical applications of selected medical therapeutic devices associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders. Letter grading.

  • C183. Targeted Drug Delivery and Controlled Drug Release

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L. New therapeutics require comprehensive understanding of modern biology, physiology, biomaterials, and engineering. Targeted delivery of genes and drugs and their controlled release are important in treatment of challenging diseases and relevant to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Drug pharmacodynamics and clinical pharmacokinetics. Application of engineering principles (diffusion, transport, kinetics) to problems in drug formulation and delivery to establish rationale for design and development of novel drug delivery systems that can provide spatial and temporal control of drug release. Introduction to biomaterials with specialized structural and interfacial properties. Exploration of both chemistry of materials and physical presentation of devices and compounds used in delivery and release. Concurrently scheduled with course C283. Letter grading.

  • M184. Introduction to Computational and Systems Biology

    Units: 2

    (Same as Computational and Systems Biology M184 and Computer Science M184.) Lecture, two hours; outside study, four hours. Enforced requisites: one course from Civil Engineering M20, Computer Science 31, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M20, or Program in Computing 10A, and Mathematics 3B or 31B. Survey course designed to introduce students to computational and systems modeling and computation in biology and medicine, providing motivation, flavor, culture, and cutting-edge contributions in computational biosciences and aiming for more informed basis for focused studies by students with computational and systems biology interests. Presentations by individual UCLA researchers discussing their active computational and systems biology research. P/NP grading.

  • C185. Introduction to Tissue Engineering

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course CM102 or CM202, Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L. Tissue engineering applies principles of biology and physical sciences with engineering approach to regenerate tissues and organs. Guiding principles for proper selection of three basic components for tissue engineering: cells, scaffolds, and molecular signals. Concurrently scheduled with course C285. Letter grading.

  • CM186. Computational Systems Biology: Modeling and Simulation of Biological Systems

    Units: 5

    (Same as Computational and Systems Biology M186, Computer Science CM186, and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology M178.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Corequisite: Electrical Engineering 102. Dynamic biosystems modeling and computer simulation methods for studying biological/biomedical processes and systems at multiple levels of organization. Control system, multicompartmental, predator-prey, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and other structural modeling methods applied to life sciences problems at molecular, cellular (biochemical pathways/networks), organ, and organismic levels. Both theory- and data-driven modeling, with focus on translating biomodeling goals and data into mathematics models and implementing them for simulation and analysis. Basics of numerical simulation algorithms, with modeling software exercises in class and PC laboratory assignments. Concurrently scheduled with course CM286. Letter grading.

  • CM187. Research Communication in Computational and Systems Biology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Computational and Systems Biology M187 and Computer Science CM187.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course CM186. Closely directed, interactive, and real research experience in active quantitative systems biology research laboratory. Direction on how to focus on topics of current interest in scientific community, appropriate to student interests and capabilities. Critiques of oral presentations and written progress reports explain how to proceed with search for research results. Major emphasis on effective research reporting, both oral and written. Concurrently scheduled with course CM287. Letter grading.

  • 188. Special Courses in Bioengineering

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Special topics in bioengineering for undergraduate students taught on experimental or temporary basis, such as those taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 194. Research Group Seminars: Bioengineering

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to bioengineering undergraduate students who are part of research group. Study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research in Bioengineering

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit with school approval. Individual contract required; enrollment petitions available in Office of Academic and Student Affairs. Letter grading.

  • C201. Engineering Principles for Drug Delivery

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Mathematics 33B, Physics 1B. Application of engineering principles for designing and understanding delivery of therapeutics. Discussion of physics and mathematics required for understanding colloidal stability. Analysis of concepts related to both modeling and experimentation of endocytosis and intracellular trafficking mechanisms. Analysis of diffusion of drugs, coupled with computational and engineering mathematics approaches. Concurrently scheduled with course C101. Letter grading.

  • CM202. Human Physiological Systems for Bioengineering I

    Units: 4

    (Same as Physiological Science CM204.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: human molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Not open for credit to Physiological Science majors. Broad overview of basic biological activities and organization of human body in system (organ/tissue) to system basis, with particular emphasis on molecular basis. Modeling/simulation of functional aspect of biological system included. Actual demonstration of biomedical instruments, as well as visits to biomedical facilities. Concurrently scheduled with course CM102. Letter grading.

  • CM203. Human Physiological Systems for Bioengineering II

    Units: 4

    (Same as Physiological Science CM203.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: human molecular biology, biochemistry, and cell biology. Not open for credit to Physiological Science majors. Molecular-level understanding of human anatomy and physiology in selected organ systems (digestive, skin, musculoskeletal, endocrine, immune, urinary, reproductive). System-specific modeling/simulations (immune regulation, wound healing, muscle mechanics and energetics, acid-base balance, excretion). Functional basis of biomedical instrumentation (dialysis, artificial skin, pathogen detectors, ultrasound, birth-control drug delivery). Concurrently scheduled with course CM103. Letter grading.

  • C204. Physical Chemistry of Biomacromolecules

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, 30A, Life Sciences 2, 3. To understand biological materials and design synthetic replacements, it is imperative to understand their physical chemistry. Biomacromolecules such as protein or DNA can be analyzed and characterized by applying fundamentals of polymer physical chemistry. Investigation of polymer structure and conformation, bulk and solution thermodynamics and phase behavior, polymer networks, and viscoelasticity. Application of engineering principles to problems involving biomacromolecules such as protein conformation, solvation of charged species, and separation and characterization of biomacromolecules. Concurrently scheduled with course C104. Letter grading.

  • C205. Engineering of Bioconjugates

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L. Highly recommended: one organic chemistry course. Bioconjugate chemistry is science of coupling biomolecules for wide range of applications. Oligonucleotides may be coupled to one surface in gene chip, or one protein may be coupled to one polymer to enhance its stability in serum. Wide variety of bioconjugates are used in delivery of pharmaceuticals, in sensors, in medical diagnostics, and in tissue engineering. Basic concepts of chemical ligation, including choice and design of conjugate linkers depending on type of biomolecule and desired application, such as degradable versus nondegradable linkers. Presentation and discussion of design and synthesis of synthetic bioconjugates for some sample applications. Concurrently scheduled with course C105. Letter grading.

  • C206. Topics in Bioelectricity for Bioengineers

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20B, Life Sciences 2, 3, Mathematics 33B, Physics 1C. Coverage in depth of physical processes associated with biological membranes and channel proteins, with specific emphasis on electrophysiology. Basic physical principles governing electrostatics in dielectric media, building on complexity to ultimately address action potentials and signal propagation in nerves. Topics include Nernst/Planck and Poisson/Boltzmann equations, Nernst potential, Donnan equilibrium, GHK equations, energy barriers in ion channels, cable equation, action potentials, Hodgkin/Huxley equations, impulse propagation, axon geometry and conduction, dendritic integration. Concurrently scheduled with course C106. Letter grading.

  • C207. Polymer Chemistry for Bioengineers

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: course C204 or C205. Fundamental concepts of polymer synthesis, including step-growth, chain growth (ionic, radical, metal catalyzed), and ring-opening, with focus on factors that can be used to control chain length, chain length distribution, and chain-end functionality, chain copolymerization, and stereochemistry in polymerizations. Presentation of applications of use of different polymerization techniques. Concepts of step-growth, chain-growth, ring-opening, and coordination polymerization, and effects of synthesis route on polymer properties. Lectures include both theory and practical issues demonstrated through examples. Concurrently scheduled with course C107. Letter grading.

  • M214A. Digital Speech Processing

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M214A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 113. Theory and applications of digital processing of speech signals. Mathematical models of human speech production and perception mechanisms, speech analysis/synthesis. Techniques include linear prediction, filter-bank models, and homomorphic filtering. Applications to speech synthesis, automatic recognition, and hearing aids. Letter grading.

  • M214A. Digital Speech Processing (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M214A.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 113. Theory and applications of digital processing of speech signals. Mathematical models of human speech production and perception mechanisms, speech analysis/synthesis. Techniques include linear prediction, filter-bank models, and homomorphic filtering. Applications to speech synthesis, automatic recognition, and hearing aids. Letter grading.

  • M215. Biochemical Reaction Engineering

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemical Engineering CM215.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: Chemical Engineering 101C. Use of previously learned concepts of biophysical chemistry, thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and reaction kinetics to develop tools needed for technical design and economic analysis of biological reactors. Letter grading.

  • M217. Biomedical Imaging

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M217.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 114 or 211A. Optical imaging modalities in biomedicine. Other nonoptical imaging modalities discussed briefly for comparison purposes. Letter grading.

  • M217. Biomedical Imaging (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M217.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 114 or 211A. Optical imaging modalities in biomedicine. Other nonoptical imaging modalities discussed briefly for comparison purposes. Letter grading.

  • M219. Principles and Applications of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Units: 4

    (Same as Physics and Biology in Medicine M219.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Basic principles of magnetic resonance (MR), physics, and image formation. Emphasis on hardware, Bloch equations, analytic expressions, image contrast mechanisms, spin and gradient echoes, Fourier transform imaging methods, structure of pulse sequences, and various scanning parameters. Introduction to advanced techniques in rapid imaging, quantitative imaging, and spectroscopy. Letter grading.

  • 220. Introduction to Medical Informatics

    Units: 2

    Lecture, two hours; outside study, four hours. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to research topics and issues in medical informatics for students new to field. Definition of this emerging field of study, current research efforts, and future directions in research. Key issues in medical informatics to expose students to different application domains, such as information system architectures, data and process modeling, information extraction and representations, information retrieval and visualization, health services research, telemedicine. Emphasis on current research endeavors and applications. S/U grading.

  • 221. Human Anatomy and Physiology for Medical and Imaging Informatics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to basic human anatomy and physiology, with particular emphasis on understanding and visualization of anatomy and physiology through medical images. Topics relevant to acquisition, representation, and dissemination of anatomical knowledge in computerized clinical applications. Topics include chest, cardiac, neurology, gastrointestinal/genitourinary, endocrine, and musculoskeletal systems. Introduction to basic imaging physics (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, ultrasound, computed radiography) to provide context for imaging modalities predominantly used to view human anatomy. Geared toward nonphysicians who require more formal understanding of human anatomy/physiology. Letter grading.

  • 223A. Programming Laboratory for Medical and Imaging Informatics I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Computer Science 31, 32, Program in Computing 20A, 20B. Course 223A is requisite to 223B, which is requisite to 223C. Designed for graduate students. Programming laboratory to support coursework in other medical and imaging informatics core curriculum courses. Exposure to programming concepts for medical applications, with focus on basic abstraction techniques used in image processing and medical information system infrastructures. Integrated with topics presented in course M227 to reinforce concepts presented with practical experience. Projects focus on understanding medical networking issues and implementation of basic protocols for healthcare environment, with emphasis on use of DICOM. Introduction to basic tools and methods used within informatics. Letter grading.

  • 223B. Programming Laboratory for Medical and Imaging Informatics II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 223A. Designed for graduate students. Programming laboratory to support coursework in other medical and imaging informatics core curriculum courses. Exposure to programming concepts for medical applications, with focus on basic abstraction techniques used in image processing and medical information system infrastructures. Integrated with topics presented in courses 223A, M227, and M228 to reinforce concepts presented with practical experience. Projects focus on medical image manipulation and decision support systems. Letter grading.

  • 223C. Programming Laboratory for Medical and Imaging Informatics III

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 223B. Designed for graduate students. Programming laboratory to support coursework in other medical and imaging informatics core curriculum courses. Exposure to programming concepts for medical applications, with focus on basic abstraction techniques used to extract meaningful features from medical text and imaging data and visualize results. Integrated with topics presented in courses 224B and M226 to reinforce concepts presented with practical experience. Projects focus on medical information retrieval, knowledge representation, and visualization. Letter grading.

  • 224A. Physics and Informatics of Medical Imaging

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisites: Mathematics 33A, 33B. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to principles of medical imaging and imaging informatics for nonphysicists. Overview of core imaging modalities: X ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR). Topics include signal generation, localization, and quantization. Image representation and analysis techniques such as Markov random fields, spatial characterization (atlases), denoising, energy representations, and clinical imaging workstation design. Provides basic understanding of issues related to basic medical image acquisition and analysis. Current research efforts with focus on clinical applications and new types of information made available through these modalities. Letter grading.

  • 224B. Advances in Imaging Informatics

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 224A. Overview of information retrieval techniques in medical imaging and informatics-based applications of imaging, with focus on various advances in field. Introduction to core concepts in information retrieval (IR), reviewing seminal papers on evaluating IR systems and their use in medicine (e.g., teaching files, case-based retrieval, etc.). Medical content-based image retrieval (CBIR) as motivating application, with examination of core works in this area. Techniques to realize medical CBIR, including image feature extraction and processing, feature representation, classification schemes (via machine learning), image indexing, image querying methods, and visualization of images (e.g., perception, presentation). Discussion of more advanced methods now being pursued by researchers. Letter grading.

  • M225. Bioseparations and Bioprocess Engineering

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemical Engineering CM225.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced corequisite: Chemical Engineering 101C. Separation strategies, unit operations, and economic factors used to design processes for isolating and purifying materials like whole cells, enzymes, food additives, or pharmaceuticals that are products of biological reactors. Letter grading.

  • M226. Medical Knowledge Representation

    Units: 4

    (Same as Information Studies M253.) Seminar, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Issues related to medical knowledge representation and its application in healthcare processes. Topics include data structures used for representing knowledge (conceptual graphs, frame-based models), different data models for representing spatio-temporal information, rule-based implementations, current statistical methods for discovery of knowledge (data mining, statistical classifiers, and hierarchical classification), and basic information retrieval. Review of work in constructing ontologies, with focus on problems in implementation and definition. Common medical ontologies, coding schemes, and standardized indices/terminologies (SNOMED, UMLS). Letter grading.

  • M227. Medical Information Infrastructures and Internet Technologies

    Units: 4

    (Same as Information Studies M254.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Introduction to networking, communications, and information infrastructures in medical environment. Exposure to basic concepts related to networking at several levels: low-level (TCP/IP, services), medium-level (network topologies), and high-level (distributed computing, Web-based services) implementations. Commonly used medical communication protocols (HL7, DICOM) and current medical information systems (HIS, RIS, PACS). Advances in networking, such as wireless health systems, peer-to-peer topologies, grid/cloud computing. Introduction to security and encryption in networked environments. Letter grading.

  • M228. Medical Decision Making

    Units: 4

    (Same as Information Studies M255.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Designed for graduate students. Overview of issues related to medical decision making. Introduction to concept of evidence-based medicine and decision processes related to process of care and outcomes. Basic probability and statistics to understand research results and evaluations, and algorithmic methods for decision-making processes (Bayes theorem, decision trees). Study design, hypothesis testing, and estimation. Focus on technical advances in medical decision support systems and expert systems, with review of classic and current research. Introduction to common statistical and decision-making software packages to familiarize students with current tools. Letter grading.

  • C231. Nanopore Sensing

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: courses 100, 120, Life Sciences 2, 3, Physics 1A, 1B, 1C. Analysis of sensors based on measurements of fluctuating ionic conductance through artificial or protein nanopores. Physics of pore conductance. Applications to single molecule detection and DNA sequencing. Review of current literature and technological applications. History and instrumentation of resistive pulse sensing, theory and instrumentation of electrical measurements in electrolytes, nanopore fabrication, ionic conductance through pores and GHK equation, patch clamp and single channel measurements and instrumentation, noise issues, protein engineering, molecular sensing, DNA sequencing, membrane engineering, and future directions of field. Concurrently scheduled with course C131. Letter grading.

  • M233A. Medtech Innovation I: Entrepreneurial Opportunities in Medical Technology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Management M271A.) Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Designed for graduate and professional students in engineering, dentistry, design, law, management, and medicine. Focus on understanding how to identify unmet clinical needs, properly filtering through these needs using various acceptance criteria, and selecting promising needs for which potential medtech solutions are explored. Students work in groups to expedite traditional research and development processes to invent and implement new medtech devices that increase quality of clinical care and result in improved patient outcomes in hospital system. Introduction to intellectual property basics and various medtech business models. Letter grading.

  • M233B. Medtech Innovation II: Prototyping and New Venture Development

    Units: 4

    (Same as Management M271B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, three hours; outside study, six hours. Enforced requisite: course M233A. Designed for graduate and professional students in engineering, dentistry, design, law, management, and medicine. Development of medtech solutions for unmet clinical needs previously identified in course M233A. Steps necessary to commercialize viable medtech solutions. Exploration of concept selection, business plan development, intellectual property filing, financing strategies, and device prototyping. Letter grading.

  • C239A. Biomolecular Materials Science I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Overview of chemical and physical foundations of biomolecular materials science that concern materials aspects of molecular biology, cell biology, and bioengineering. Understanding of different types of interactions that exist between biomolecules, such as van der Waals interactions, entropically modulated electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, hydration and solvation interactions, polymer-mediated interactions, depletion interactions, molecular recognition, and others. Illustration of these ideas using examples from bioengineering and biomedical engineering. Students should be able to make simple calculations and estimates that allow them to engage broad spectrum of bioengineering problems, such as those in drug and gene delivery and tissue engineering. May be taken independently for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C139A. Letter grading.

  • C239B. Biomolecular Materials Science II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Course C239A is not requisite to C239B. Overview of chemical and physical foundations of biomolecular materials science that concern materials aspects of molecular biology, cell biology, and bioengineering. Understanding of different basic types of biomolecules, with emphasis on nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids. Study of how biological and biomimetic systems organize into their functional forms via self-assembly and how these structures impart biological function. Illustration of these ideas using examples from bioengineering and biomedical engineering. Case study on current topics, including drug delivery, gene therapy, cancer therapeutics, emerging pathogens, and relation of self-assembly to disease states. May be taken independently for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C139B. Letter grading.

  • CM240. Introduction to Biomechanics

    Units: 4

    (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM240.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 101, 102, and 156A or 166A. Introduction to mechanical functions of human body; skeletal adaptations to optimize load transfer, mobility, and function. Dynamics and kinematics. Fluid mechanics applications. Heat and mass transfer. Power generation. Laboratory simulations and tests. Concurrently scheduled with course CM140. Letter grading.

  • CM241. Mechanics of Cells

    Units: 4

    (Same as Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering CM241.) Lecture, four hours. Introduction to physical structures of cell biology and physical principles that govern how they function mechanically. Review and application of continuum mechanics and statistical mechanics to develop quantitative mathematical models of structural mechanics in cells. Structure of macromolecules, polymers as entropic springs, random walks and diffusion, mechanosensitive proteins, single-molecule force-extension, DNA packing and transcriptional regulation, lipid bilayer membranes, mechanics of cytoskeleton, molecular motors, biological electricity, muscle mechanics, pattern formation. Concurrently scheduled with course CM141. Letter grading.

  • CM245. Molecular Biotechnology for Engineers

    Units: 4

    (Same as Chemical Engineering CM245.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Selected topics in molecular biology that form foundation of biotechnology and biomedical industry today. Topics include recombinant DNA technology, molecular research tools, manipulation of gene expression, directed mutagenesis and protein engineering, DNA-based diagnostics and DNA microarrays, antibody and protein-based diagnostics, genomics and bioinformatics, isolation of human genes, gene therapy, and tissue engineering. Concurrently scheduled with course CM145. Letter grading.

  • C247. Applied Tissue Engineering: Clinical and Industrial Perspective

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: course CM202, Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L, Life Sciences 1 or 2. Overview of central topics of tissue engineering, with focus on how to build artificial tissues into regulated clinically viable products. Topics include biomaterials selection, cell source, delivery methods, FDA approval processes, and physical/chemical and biological testing. Case studies include skin and artificial skin, bone and cartilage, blood vessels, neurotissue engineering, and liver, kidney, and other organs. Clinical and industrial perspectives of tissue engineering products. Manufacturing constraints, clinical limitations, and regulatory challenges in design and development of tissue-engineering devices. Concurrently scheduled with course C147. Letter grading.

  • M248. Introduction to Biological Imaging

    Units: 4

    (Same as Pharmacology M248 and Physics and Biology in Medicine M248.) Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Exploration of role of biological imaging in modern biology and medicine, including imaging physics, instrumentation, image processing, and applications of imaging for range of modalities. Practical experience provided through series of imaging laboratories. Letter grading.

  • M250B. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Fabrication

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M250B and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M280B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course M153. Advanced discussion of micromachining processes used to construct MEMS. Coverage of many lithographic, deposition, and etching processes, as well as their combination in process integration. Materials issues such as chemical resistance, corrosion, mechanical properties, and residual/intrinsic stress. Letter grading.

  • M250B. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Fabrication (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M250B and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M280B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Enforced requisite: course M153. Advanced discussion of micromachining processes used to construct MEMS. Coverage of many lithographic, deposition, and etching processes, as well as their combination in process integration. Materials issues such as chemical resistance, corrosion, mechanical properties, and residual/intrinsic stress. Letter grading.

  • M252. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Device Physics and Design

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M252 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M282.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to MEMS design. Design methods, design rules, sensing and actuation mechanisms, microsensors, and microactuators. Designing MEMS to be produced with both foundry and nonfoundry processes. Computer-aided design for MEMS. Design project required. Letter grading.

  • M252. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Device Physics and Design (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M252 and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering M282.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Introduction to MEMS design. Design methods, design rules, sensing and actuation mechanisms, microsensors, and microactuators. Designing MEMS to be produced with both foundry and nonfoundry processes. Computer-aided design for MEMS. Design project required. Letter grading.

  • C255. Fluid-Particle and Fluid-Structure Interactions in Microflows

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, one hour; outside study, seven hours. Enforced requisite: course 110. Introduction to Navier/Stokes equations, assumptions, and simplifications. Analytical framework for calculating simple flows and numerical methods to solve and gain intuition for complex flows. Forces on particles in Stokes flow and finite-inertia flows. Flows induced around particles with and without finite inertia and implications for particle-particle interactions. Secondary flows induced by structures and particles in confined flows. Particle separations by fluid dynamic forces: field-flow fractionation, inertial focusing, structure-induced separations. Application concepts in internal biological flows and separations for biotechnology. Helps students become sufficiently fluent with fluid mechanics vocabulary and techniques, design and model microfluidic systems to manipulate fluids, cells, and particles, and develop strong intuition for how fluid and particles behave in arbitrarily structured microchannels over range of Reynolds numbers. Concurrently scheduled with course C155. Letter grading.

  • M260. Neuroengineering

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M255 and Neuroscience M206.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, five hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32A, Physics 1B or 6B. Introduction to principles and technologies of bioelectricity and neural signal recording, processing, and stimulation. Topics include bioelectricity, electrophysiology (action potentials, local field potentials, EEG, ECOG), intracellular and extracellular recording, microelectrode technology, neural signal processing (neural signal frequency bands, filtering, spike detection, spike sorting, stimulation artifact removal), brain-computer interfaces, deep-brain stimulation, and prosthetics. Letter grading.

  • M260. Neuroengineering (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M255 and Neuroscience M206.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, five hours. Requisites: Mathematics 32A, Physics 1B or 6B. Introduction to principles and technologies of bioelectricity and neural signal recording, processing, and stimulation. Topics include bioelectricity, electrophysiology (action potentials, local field potentials, EEG, ECOG), intracellular and extracellular recording, microelectrode technology, neural signal processing (neural signal frequency bands, filtering, spike detection, spike sorting, stimulation artifact removal), brain-computer interfaces, deep-brain stimulation, and prosthetics. Letter grading.

  • M261A. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering

    Units: 2

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M256A and Neuroscience M212A.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M261A. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 2

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M256A and Neuroscience M212A.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M261B. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering

    Units: 2

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M256B and Neuroscience M212B.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M261B. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 2

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M256B and Neuroscience M212B.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M261C. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering

    Units: 2

    (Same as Electrical Engineering M256C and Neuroscience M212C.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M261C. Evaluation of Research Literature in Neuroengineering (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 2

    (Same as Electrical and Computer Engineering M256C and Neuroscience M212C.) Discussion, two hours; outside study, four hours. Critical discussion and analysis of current literature related to neuroengineering research. S/U grading.

  • M263. Neural Systems and Anatomy

    Units: 6

    (Same as Neuroscience M203.) Lecture, four hours; discussion/laboratory, two hours. Prior to first laboratory meeting, students must complete Bloodborne Pathogens training course through UCLA Environment, Health and Safety. Fundamentals of systems neuroscience, with emphasis on integration of cellular, circuit, anatomical, and behavioral analyses aimed at understanding sensorimotor processing, learning, and cognition. Anatomy laboratory includes brain dissections. Letter grading.

  • C270. Energy-Tissue Interactions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Enforced requisites: Life Sciences 2, Physics 1C. Introduction to therapeutic and diagnostic use of energy delivery devices in medical and dental applications, with emphasis on understanding fundamental mechanisms underlying various types of energy-tissue interactions. Concurrently scheduled with course C170. Letter grading.

  • C270L. Introduction to Techniques in Studying Laser-Tissue Interaction

    Units: 2

    Laboratory, four hours; outside study, two hours. Corequisite: course C270. Introduction to simulation and experimental techniques used in studying laser-tissue interactions. Topics include computer simulations of light propagation in tissue, measuring absorption spectra of tissue/tissue phantoms, making tissue phantoms, determination of optical properties of different tissues, techniques of temperature distribution measurements. Concurrently scheduled with course C170L. Letter grading.

  • C271. Laser-Tissue Interaction II: Biologic Spectroscopy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course C270. Designed for physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering majors. Introduction to optical spectroscopy principles, design of spectroscopic measurement devices, optical properties of tissues, and fluorescence spectroscopy biologic media. Concurrently scheduled with course C171. Letter grading.

  • C272. Design of Minimally Invasive Surgical Tools

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 30B, Life Sciences 2, 3, Mathematics 32A. Introduction to design principles and engineering concepts used in design and manufacture of tools for minimally invasive surgery. Coverage of FDA regulatory policy and surgical procedures. Topics include optical devices, endoscopes and laparoscopes, biopsy devices, laparoscopic tools, cardiovascular and interventional radiology devices, orthopedic instrumentation, and integration of devices with therapy. Examination of complex process of tool design, fabrication, testing, and validation. Preparation of drawings and consideration of development of new and novel devices. Concurrently scheduled with course C172. Letter grading.

  • CM278. Introduction to Biomaterials

    Units: 4

    (Same as Materials Science CM280.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, and 20L, or Materials Science 104. Engineering materials used in medicine and dentistry for repair and/or restoration of damaged natural tissues. Topics include relationships between material properties, suitability to task, surface chemistry, processing and treatment methods, and biocompatibility. Concurrently scheduled with course CM178. Letter grading.

  • C279. Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Requisite: course CM278. In-depth exploration of host cellular response to biomaterials: vascular response, interface, and clotting, biocompatibility, animal models, inflammation, infection, extracellular matrix, cell adhesion, and role of mechanical forces. Concurrently scheduled with course C179. Letter grading.

  • 282. Biomaterial Interfaces

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisite: course CM178 or CM278. Function, utility, and biocompatibility of biomaterials depend critically on their surface and interfacial properties. Discussion of morphology and composition of biomaterials and nanoscales, mesoscales, and macroscales, techniques for characterizing structure and properties of biomaterial interfaces, and methods for designing and fabricating biomaterials with prescribed structure and properties in vitro and in vivo. Letter grading.

  • C283. Targeted Drug Delivery and Controlled Drug Release

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, seven hours. Requisites: Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L. New therapeutics require comprehensive understanding of modern biology, physiology, biomaterials, and engineering. Targeted delivery of genes and drugs and their controlled release are important in treatment of challenging diseases and relevant to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Drug pharmacodynamics and clinical pharmacokinetics. Application of engineering principles (diffusion, transport, kinetics) to problems in drug formulation and delivery to establish rationale for design and development of novel drug delivery systems that can provide spatial and temporal control of drug release. Introduction to biomaterials with specialized structural and interfacial properties. Exploration of both chemistry of materials and physical presentation of devices and compounds used in delivery and release. Concurrently scheduled with course C183. Letter grading.

  • M284. Functional Neuroimaging: Techniques and Applications

    Units: 3

    (Same as Neuroscience M285, Physics and Biology in Medicine M285, Psychiatry M285, and Psychology M278.) Lecture, three hours. In-depth examination of activation imaging, including MRI and electrophysiological methods, data acquisition and analysis, experimental design, and results obtained thus far in human systems. Strong focus on understanding technologies, how to design activation imaging paradigms, and how to interpret results. Laboratory visits and design and implementation of functional MRI experiment. S/U or letter grading.

  • C285. Introduction to Tissue Engineering

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: course CM102 or CM202, Chemistry 20A, 20B, 20L. Tissue engineering applies principles of biology and physical sciences with engineering approach to regenerate tissues and organs. Guiding principles for proper selection of three basic components for tissue engineering: cells, scaffolds, and molecular signals. Concurrently scheduled with course C185. Letter grading.

  • CM286. Computational Systems Biology: Modeling and Simulation of Biological Systems

    Units: 5

    (Same as Computer Science CM286.) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, three hours; outside study, eight hours. Corequisite: Electrical Engineering 102. Dynamic biosystems modeling and computer simulation methods for studying biological/biomedical processes and systems at multiple levels of organization. Control system, multicompartmental, predator-prey, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and other structural modeling methods applied to life sciences problems at molecular, cellular (biochemical pathways/networks), organ, and organismic levels. Both theory- and data-driven modeling, with focus on translating biomodeling goals and data into mathematics models and implementing them for simulation and analysis. Basics of numerical simulation algorithms, with modeling software exercises in class and PC laboratory assignments. Concurrently scheduled with course CM186. Letter grading.

  • CM287. Research Communication in Computational and Systems Biology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Computer Science CM287.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course CM286. Closely directed, interactive, and real research experience in active quantitative systems biology research laboratory. Direction on how to focus on topics of current interest in scientific community, appropriate to student interests and capabilities. Critiques of oral presentations and written progress reports explain how to proceed with search for research results. Major emphasis on effective research reporting, both oral and written. Concurrently scheduled with course CM187. Letter grading.

  • 295A. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Biomaterial Research

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295B. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Research

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295C. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Minimally Invasive and Laser Research

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295D. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Hybrid Device Research

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295E. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Molecular Cell Bioengineering Research

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295F. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Biopolymer Materials and Chemistry

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295G. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Biomicrofluidics and Bionanotechnology Research

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295H. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Biomimetic System Research

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295J. Seminar: Research Topics in Bioengineering -- Neural Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to bioengineering graduate students. Advanced study and analysis of current topics in bioengineering. Discussion of current research and literature in research specialty of faculty member teaching course. Student presentation of projects in research specialty. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • M296A. Advanced Modeling Methodology for Dynamic Biomedical Systems

    Units: 4

    (Same as Computer Science M296A and Medicine M270C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 141 or 142 or Mathematics 115A or Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 171A. Development of dynamic systems modeling methodology for physiological, biomedical, pharmacological, chemical, and related systems. Control system, multicompartmental, noncompartmental, and input/output models, linear and nonlinear. Emphasis on model applications, limitations, and relevance in biomedical sciences and other limited data environments. Problem solving in PC laboratory. Letter grading.

  • M296B. Optimal Parameter Estimation and Experiment Design for Biomedical Systems

    Units: 4

    (Same as Biomathematics M270, Computer Science M296B, and Medicine M270D.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course CM286 or M296A or Biomathematics 220. Estimation methodology and model parameter estimation algorithms for fitting dynamic system models to biomedical data. Model discrimination methods. Theory and algorithms for designing optimal experiments for developing and quantifying models, with special focus on optimal sampling schedule design for kinetic models. Exploration of PC software for model building and optimal experiment design via applications in physiology and pharmacology. Letter grading.

  • M296C. Advanced Topics and Research in Biomedical Systems Modeling and Computing

    Units: 4

    (Same as Computer Science M296C and Medicine M270E.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M296B. Research techniques and experience on special topics involving models, modeling methods, and model/computing in biological and medical sciences. Review and critique of literature. Research problem searching and formulation. Approaches to solutions. Individual M.S.- and Ph.D.-level project training. Letter grading.

  • M296D. Introduction to Computational Cardiology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Computer Science M296D.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course CM186. Introduction to mathematical modeling and computer simulation of cardiac electrophysiological process. Ionic models of action potential (AP). Theory of AP propagation in one-dimensional and two-dimensional cardiac tissue. Simulation on sequential and parallel supercomputers, choice of numerical algorithms, to optimize accuracy and to provide computational stability. Letter grading.

  • 298. Special Studies in Bioengineering

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Study of selected topics in bioengineering taught by resident and visiting faculty members. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 299. Seminar: Bioengineering Topics

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Designed for graduate bioengineering students. Seminar by leading academic and industrial bioengineers from UCLA, other universities, and bioengineering companies such as Baxter, Amgen, Medtronics, and Guidant on development and application of recent technological advances in discipline. Exploration of cutting-edge developments and challenges in wound healing models, stem cell biology, angiogenesis, signal transduction, gene therapy, cDNA microarray technology, bioartificial cultivation, nano- and micro-hybrid devices, scaffold engineering, and bioinformatics. S/U grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 495. Teaching Assistant Training Seminar

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours; outside study, four hours. Limited to graduate bioengineering students. Required of all departmental teaching assistants. May be taken concurrently while holding TA appointment. Seminar on communicating bioengineering and biomedical engineering principles, concepts, and methods; teaching assistant preparation, organization, and presentation of material, including use of visual aids, grading, advising, and rapport with students. S/U grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual or Tutorial Studies

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate bioengineering students. Petition forms to request enrollment may be obtained from program office. Supervised investigation of advanced technical problems. S/U grading.

  • 597A. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate bioengineering students. Reading and preparation for M.S. comprehensive examination. S/U grading.

  • 597B. Preparation for Ph.D. Preliminary Examination

    Units: 2 to 16

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate bioengineering students. S/U grading.

  • 597C. Preparation for Ph.D. Oral Qualifying Examination

    Units: 2 to 16

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate bioengineering students. Preparation for oral qualifying examination, including preliminary research on dissertation. S/U grading.

  • 598. Research for and Preparation of M.S. Thesis

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate bioengineering students. Supervised independent research for M.S. candidates, including thesis prospectus. S/U grading.

  • 599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation

    Units: 2 to 16

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to graduate bioengineering students. Usually taken after students have been advanced to candidacy. S/U grading.