• 1. Introduction to Design

    Units: 2 to 3

    Studio/lecture/field trips, 40 hours. Limited to high school students. Two- or three-week intensive summer course in architectural design, with focus on developing design skills through space making and its representation. Exposure to contemporary architectural practices through studio work, lectures and presentations, field trips, and final demonstration, critique, and exhibition of student work. Offered only as part of Teen Arch Studio summer program. P/NP grading.

  • 10A. History of Architecture and Urban Design: Prehistory to Mannerism

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Exploration of developments in global architecture and urban design from prehistory to 1600 and critical reflection on terms such as building, architecture, city, history, and culture. Focus on world context, construction and technology, and history of architectural ideas. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 10B. History of Architecture and Urban Design: Baroque to Contemporary Moment

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Survey of architectural and urban history from 1600 to present in global context. Exploration of buildings, cities, spaces, artifacts, landscapes, and ideas through their relation to geopolitical conditions and through their relation to theories of design. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 30. Introduction to Architectural Studies

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Exploration of role of built environment in social, cultural, and political life: how buildings are constructed, what they mean, effects they have on world, and ways they imagine new futures and shape private and public life. Focus on series of contemporary case studies for what each reveals about new possibilities for shaping world in which we live, with emphasis on how architecture extends to cities, roads, books, and films. Consideration of historical context and cultural genealogy of particular buildings and environments, material and economic conditions of building, and more. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 102. Introduction to Representation

    Units: 2

    Studio, four hours; outside study, two hours. Limited to currently enrolled college/university students and graduates of colleges/universities. Introduction to techniques of spatial representation as they relate to architectural design. How to communicate using two- and three-dimensional drawing and modeling. Analog and digital techniques and opportunity afforded by moving between both. Analog techniques include orthographic and axonometric projection. Digital techniques focus on computer graphics fundamentals, including bit map and vector graphic imaging using Adobe suite and modeling using Rhinoceros. Offered in summer only. Letter grading.

  • 103. Introduction to Architectural Design

    Units: 6

    Studio, 18 hours. Limited to currently enrolled college/university students and graduates of colleges/universities. Introduction to basic architectural design principles and problem solving. How to control point, line, surface, and volume to shape spaces for human use. Visual analysis as tool for discussing and understanding organization. Techniques of repetition, variation, order, scale, and rhythm. Use of case-study analysis to uncover disciplinary issues within design problems and production of individual solutions to problems. Offered in summer only. Letter grading.

  • 121. Studio I

    Units: 6

    Studio, eight hours; outside study, 10 hours. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. Introduction to basic architectural design principles and problem solving: how to control point, line, surface, and volume to shape spaces for human use. Visual analysis as tool for discussing and understanding organization. Techniques of repetition, variation, order, scale, and rhythm. Use of case-study analysis to uncover disciplinary issues within design problems, as well as to produce individual solutions to those problems. Letter grading.

  • 122. Studio II

    Units: 6

    Studio, eight hours; outside study, 10 hours. Enforced requisite: course 121. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. Issues of inhabitation, domesticity, and program. Architectural precedents and principles of spatial organization. Relationship of architectural form to human body and role of architectural space in choreography of human activity. Understanding and application of knowledge of architectural tectonics, structure, and measurement. Letter grading.

  • 123. Studio III

    Units: 6

    Studio, eight hours; outside study, 10 hours. Enforced requisites: courses 121, 122. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. Introduction to disciplinary issues, techniques, and organizations of landscape and how those can influence design of building and site. Development of material and temporal characteristics of architecture relative to role those play in landscape. Introduction to issues of accessibility and egress as systems of movement. Structure as serial component that relates to site, construction, topography, climatology, accessibility, and their mutual interaction. Letter grading.

  • M125B. Digital Cultural Mapping Core Course B: Google Earth, Geographic Information Systems, Hypercities, and Timelines

    Units: 4

    (Same as Ancient Near East M125B.) Laboratory, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: Ancient Near East 125A. Hands-on laboratory-based investigation of emerging digital mapping technologies, including instruction in Web-based mapping applications, virtual globes, and geographic information systems (GIS). Critique and creation of maps of cultural phenomena, applying skills students learned in Ancient Near East 125A to real-world data sets in humanities and social sciences. By mastering emerging technologies in field of digital cultural mapping, students take part in evaluation and production of sophisticated visual representations of complex data, becoming active participants in development of this new field. How to use suite of GIS and neogeography tools. Fostering of creative approaches to and engagement with mapping technologies: What new questions can be asked and answered using these technologies? How does one reason, argue, and solve real-world problems through digital cultural mapping? Design, development, and implementation of student mappi

  • M125C. Digital Cultural Mapping Core Course C: Summer Research

    Units: 4

    (Same as Ancient Near East M125C.) Laboratory, three hours; fieldwork, one hour. Enforced requisite: course M125B or Ancient Near East M125B. Participation in collaborative geographic information systems (GIS) research project in humanities or social sciences using skills learned in courses 125A and M125B. Gathering and input of datasets from real-world sources, creating visual representations of data through production of digital maps, and performing analysis of larger dataset to answer specific research questions. Final oral presentation required that details student work and provides critical analysis of source material and technological/methodological issues inherent to type of GIS used for investigation. Part of Digital Cultural Mapping Project supported by W.M. Keck Foundation. Offered in summer only. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM130. Space and Place

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M130.) (Same as World Arts and Cultures CM130.) Lecture, three hours. Survey of array of spaces and places from cross-cultural or comparative perspective and with performance emphasis, with focus on mutual interaction of human beings and their created environments. Emphasis on common, ordinary, anonymous, or vernacular nonbuilt and built environments, which are built and used by members of small-scale, traditional, and transitional communities around world. Concurrently scheduled with course CM230. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 131. Issues in Contemporary Design

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; outside study, 12 hours. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. How global design culture today operates as part of set of spatial, economic, political, and social discourses. From development of cities to new formal languages in architecture, consequences of fact that great percentage of our lives is spent in controlled designed environments, including role that research and interdisciplinarity play today in influencing design ideas and processes, as well as how design is influenced by technology and new urban conditions. Letter grading.

  • 132. Domestic Architecture: Critical History

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; outside study, 12 hours. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. Investigation of relationship between culture and design through medium of domestic architecture, from communal living arrangements of antiquity to functional and automated ideals of modern movement. Exploration of how design of domestic interior has evolved to express and accommodate corresponding developments in lifestyle and taste. Letter grading.

  • 133. Modernism and Metropolis

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; outside study, 12 hours. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. Introduction to emergence of contemporary metropolis through series of comparative urban explorations that begin in Los Angeles and extend to engage range of cities, including key examples from Asia to South America. Modern project can be seen in myriad forms across globe, so that city and suburb, taken together, exist in complex commingling of aesthetic, political, spatial, economic, technological, and social issues. Letter grading.

  • 141. Technology I: Projections

    Units: 5

    Laboratory, four hours; outside study, 11 hours. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. Introduction to techniques of spatial representation as they relate to architectural design. How to communicate using two- and three-dimensional drawing and modeling. Analog and digital techniques and opportunity afforded by moving between both. Analog techniques include orthographic and axonometric projection. Digital techniques focus on computer graphics fundamentals, including bit map and vector graphic imaging using Adobe suite and modeling using Rhinoceros. Letter grading.

  • 142. Technology II: Building Materials and Methods

    Units: 5

    Laboratory, four hours; outside study, 11 hours. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. Introduction to construction systems and materials in relation to design, such as framed, bearing wall, or hybrid systems. Graphic conventions and organization of construction documents. Letter grading.

  • 143. Technology III: Digital Technology

    Units: 5

    Laboratory, four hours; outside study, 11 hours. Limited to Architectural Studies majors. Overview of three-dimensional computer-aided visualization concepts, teaching applications of AutoCAD and Maya and their use relative to process of design and visual communication. Basic representation methods and tools and introduction to additional concepts required to dynamically interact with computer and to explore and understand communicative capacities of different methods of representation. Explanation of bitmap versus vector graphics, typography basics, and color output and integration for print and Web, and introduction to three-dimensional digital modeling and fabrication. Letter grading.

  • CM153. Introduction to Sustainable Architecture and Community Planning

    Units: 4

    (Same as Environment M153.) Lecture, three hours. Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land. Concurrently scheduled with course CM247A. Letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 191. Interventions: Urban Humanities in Action (Capstone Studio)

    Units: 4

    Seminar, four hours; studio, two hours. Requisites: Digital Humanities 30, 151. Using Los Angeles as laboratory, students address issues of spatial justice through scholarly and practical urban interventions. Projects deploy spatial technologies introduced in Digital Humanities 30 and theoretical knowledge learned in Digital Humanities 151 to create urban humanist action-projects. Letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Architecture and Urban Design

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M201. Theories of Architecture

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M201.) Lecture, three hours. Exploration of conceptual and historical structures that shape current issues in architectural theory. Readings in primary texts serve as framework for understanding nature of speculative inquiry in architectural context. Letter grading.

  • 220. Introduction to Computers

    Units: 2

    Lecture, 90 minutes; laboratory, 90 minutes; outside study, three hours. Introduction to basic concepts, skills, and theoretical aspects of computer-aided architecture design microcomputer skills. Applications selected are commonly found in professional offices. Two- and three-dimensional representation (i.e., painting, drafting, multimedia, hypermedia, and modeling). Letter grading.

  • 226C. Computer Visualization

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Concept and techniques of computer visualization of artifacts, including realistic rendering and animation. Letter grading.

  • 227D. Design and Building Models

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Review of range of information and knowledge potentially used in design. Knowledge representation, abstractions, and constructs. Logical structure of design information. Development of knowledge used in areas of design, how it can be identified, analyzed, and structured. Letter grading.

  • CM230. Space and Place

    Units: 4

    (Same as World Arts and Cultures CM230.) Lecture, three hours. Survey of array of spaces and places from cross-cultural or comparative perspective and with performance emphasis, with focus on mutual interaction of human beings and their created environments. Emphasis on common, ordinary, anonymous, or vernacular nonbuilt and built environments, which are built and used by members of small-scale, traditional, and transitional communities around world. Concurrently scheduled with course CM130. S/U or letter grading.

  • CM247A. Introduction to Sustainable Architecture and Community Planning

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M291.) Lecture, three hours. Relationship of built environment to natural environment through whole systems approach, with focus on sustainable design of buildings and planning of communities. Emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, and appropriate use of resources, including materials, water, and land. Concurrently scheduled with course CM153. Letter grading.

  • M271. Elements of Urban Design

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M292.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction of basic knowledge of elements and methods of urban design. Multidisciplinary approach leading to understanding of political, socioeconomic, and technological framework of urban systems and its dynamic interrelations. S/U or letter grading.

  • M272. Real Estate Development and Finance

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M272.) Lecture, two hours; workshop, two hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisites: Urban Planning 220A, 220B. Introduction to real estate development process specifically geared to students in planning, architecture, and urban design. Financial decision model, market studies, designs, loan packages, development plan, and feasibility studies. Lectures and projects integrate development process with proposed design solutions that are interactively modified to meet economic feasibility tests. S/U or letter grading.

  • 286. Roman Architecture and Urbanism

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of architectural and urban developments during Roman period, from archaic age to late Empire. Built environments of ancient world investigated from various perspectives, with consideration to programming, symbolism, and viewing, as well as to technological, aesthetic, and political factors. S/U or letter grading.

  • 288. Renaissance Architecture and Urbanism

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of architectural developments from 15th to 17th century. Primary focus on Italian peninsula, and extending to entire Mediterranean basin. Analysis of individual structures, cities, and landscape designs to reveal changing cultural and theoretical values, as well as specific aesthetic and iconographic content. S/U or letter grading.

  • 289. Special Topics in Architecture and Urban Design

    Units: 2 to 4

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Selected academic topics initiated by students, student teams, or faculty and directed by faculty member. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 290. Special Topics in Critical Studies in Architectural Culture

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Designed for graduate students. Exploration of how architecture operates in relation to wider cultural, historical, and theoretical issues. May be repeated for maximum of 30 units. Letter grading.

  • 291. Theory of Architectural Programming

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Exploration of concepts and methods of architectural programming and its interrelation to design process; planning of design process; various techniques for determination of program contents, basic conditions, resources, and constraints; identification of solution types for given situations. S/U or letter grading.

  • M293. Politics, Ideology, and Design

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M293.) Lecture, three hours. Exploration of cultural and political context of architecture and planning work. Examination of theory and practice from variety of perspectives applied to set of varied physical environments and to set of current spatialized concepts. Consideration of theoretical propositions that are shaping present urban and architectural debate and concrete case studies where politics and ideology shape design process. Letter grading.

  • 294A. Environmental Psychology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to models, concepts, and theories concerning impact of environment on human behavior, perception, and thought. Review of research results concerning space perception, cognitive mapping, preferences and attitudes toward environment, effects of crowding and stress, personal space and territoriality. S/U or letter grading.

  • 294B. Environmental Psychology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to models, concepts, and theories concerning impact of environment on human behavior, perception, and thought. Review of research results concerning space perception, cognitive mapping, preferences and attitudes toward environment, effects of crowding and stress, personal space and territoriality. S/U or letter grading.

  • M295. Introduction to Urban Humanities

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M295.) Seminar, six hours; studio, six hours. Core introduction to urban humanities. Analytical and descriptive methods of humanities paired with speculative and projective methods of architectural and urban design to better understand contemporary state of human environment. Focus on Los Angeles, with concepts seminar, methods laboratory, projects studio, and site visit components. Offered in summer only. S/U or letter grading.

  • 296. Proseminar: Critical Studies in Architectural Culture

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Orientation for Ph.D. students to tradition of architectural theory, scholarship, and research and to current research directions and questions, through intensive reading and critical discussion. Letter grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 401. Advanced Topics Studio

    Units: 6

    Studio, 12 hours; outside study, six hours. Preparation: satisfactory completion of intermediate-level studios (courses 412, 413, 414) or M.Arch. II student. Students may choose (through lottery) from several different projects focusing on special topics in architectural and urban design to be offered by faculty members. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

  • 402. Final Advanced Topics Studio

    Units: 6

    Studio, 12 hours; outside study, six hours. Preparation: satisfactory completion of intermediate- and advanced-level studios for M.Arch. I students; satisfactory completion of advanced-level studios and fourth-term standing for M.Arch. II students. Students may choose (through lottery) from several different advanced studio projects focusing on special topics in architectural and urban design to be offered by faculty members. Exit document (analytic paper with graphic component that critically examines final student design work) required at completion of course. Letter grading.

  • 403A. Research Studio

    Units: 2

    Seminar, three hours; outside study, three hours. Preparation: satisfactory completion of intermediate-level studios (courses 412, 413, 414, 415) or M.Arch. II student. Course 403A is requisite to 403B, which is requisite to 403C. In-depth research phase, with focus on number of different special topics in architecture and urban design. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of courses 403B and 403C).

  • 403B. Research Studio

    Units: 2

    Seminar, three hours; outside study, three hours. Preparation: satisfactory completion of intermediate-level studios (courses 412, 413, 414, 415) or M.Arch. II student. Requisite: course 403A. In-depth research phase, with focus on number of different special topics in architecture and urban design. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 403C).

  • 403C. Research Studio

    Units: 6

    Studio, 12 hours; outside study, six hours. Preparation: satisfactory completion of intermediate-level studios (courses 412, 413, 414, 415) or M.Arch. II student. Requisite: course 403B. Advanced studio project, with focus on number of different special topics in architecture and urban design. Letter grading.

  • M404. Joint Planning/Architecture Studio

    Units: 4

    (Same as Urban Planning M404.) Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour; studio, four hours. Opportunity to work on joint planning/architecture project for client. Outside speakers; field trips. Examples of past projects include Third Street Housing, Santa Monica; New American House for nontraditional households; Pico-Aliso Housing, Boyle Heights; working with resident leaders at Los Angeles City public housing developments. S/U or letter grading.

  • 411. Introductory Design Studio

    Units: 6

    Studio, 12 hours; outside study, six hours. Introduction to sketching, drawing, perspectives, CAD. Architectural composition is initially studied in terms of its separate elements. After each is studied by means of manipulative exercise that allows for experimentation of its intrinsic possibilities, students undertake series of closely controlled exercises dealing with combining elements and then design small buildings. Letter grading.

  • 412. Building Design Studio

    Units: 6

    Studio, 12 hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 411. Concentration on basic skills, leading to projects exploring architectural program in relation to design process and, particularly, implications of program on architectural forms and concepts. In second phase, introduction of structural elements to fulfill program requirements and to support and further develop intended forms and concepts. Letter grading.

  • 413. Building Design with Landscape Studio

    Units: 6

    Studio, 12 hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 412. Introduction to theoretical and technical issues such as site planning, urban design, landscape design, building typology. Building design and site planning in relation to water, landforms, and plants in natural light, heat, and ventilation. Letter grading.

  • 414. Major Building Design Studio

    Units: 6

    Studio, 12 hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 413. Designed for second-year graduate students. Introduction to issues such as programming and program manipulation, site planning, urban design, and integration of technical systems and architectural expression. Emphasis either on treatment in breadth of large-scale projects or exploration in depth and detail of smaller-scale projects. Students learn to integrate structure and environmental control and to present their ideas in graphic or model form. Letter grading.

  • 415. Comprehensive Studio

    Units: 6

    Studio, 12 hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 414. Culmination of core sequence (courses 411 through 414), with focus on development phase of project. Technical concerns such as lighting, material innovation, sustainability, construction documents, and building envelopes to be considered critical to generation of architectural form, integrated in design of single building project. Letter grading.

  • 431. Structures I

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Preparation: basic algebra, geometry, trigonometry. Introduction to structural behavior and structural statics. Operations with forces and factors, both algebraically and graphically. Equilibrium of force systems; polygon of forces and funicular polygon. Internal actions; axial force and bending moment. Reactions, stability, and statical determinacy. Determinate frames. Plane trusses; analysis and design. S/U or letter grading.

  • 432. Structures II

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 431. Mechanics of structures and structural elements. Elastic materials: stress, strain, and stress-strain relations. Theory of bending: curvature, stress and strain distributions, centroid, moments of inertia, resisting and plastic moments. Design of beams for bending, shear, and deflections. Torsion members. Instability and design of columns. Design for combined bending and compression. Tensile structures; cables, pneumatic structures. Slabs and plates; shells and folded plates. S/U or letter grading.

  • 433. Structures III

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 432. Introduction to statically indeterminate analysis. Structural materials and loads. Wind loads: distribution with height, design for comfort, structure behavior under lateral loads. Steel construction and concepts for high-rise structures. Structural case studies in timber and steel. Introduction to earthquakes: seismology, magnitude, intensity, history. Seismic instrumentation. Case studies of recent earthquakes and damage. Earthquake design concepts and seismic code requirements. S/U or letter grading.

  • 436. Introduction to Building Construction

    Units: 2

    Laboratory, two hours; outside study, four hours. Introduction to construction techniques. Study of physical principles and materials for making architecture through series of exercises and field trips. Letter grading.

  • 437. Building Construction

    Units: 4

    Laboratory, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Principles of structure and enclosure, with focus on production and materials research. Exploration of building elements for formal and functional properties; in addition, design development of project in previous studio may be developed in detail with integration of range of technical systems. Letter grading.

  • 441. Environmental Control Systems

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Design of mechanical systems necessary for functioning of large buildings: air handling, fire and life safety, plumbing, vertical and horizontal circulation, communication and electrical power distribution, analysis of interaction of these systems and their integrated effects on architectural form of building. S/U or letter grading.

  • 442. Building Climatology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Preparation: basic physics. Design of buildings that specifically respond to local climate; utilization of natural energies, human thermal comfort; sun motion and sun control devices; use of plant materials and landform to modify microclimate. S/U or letter grading.

  • 461. Architectural Practice

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Historical development of profession; role of architect in contemporary society, current forms of practice and emerging trends. Contractual relationships, ethical responsibility, office management and promotion. Case studies of practical process. S/U or letter grading.

  • 496. Special Projects in Architecture

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Projects initiated either by individual students or student teams and directed by faculty member. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 497. Special Projects in Urban Design

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Projects initiated either by individual students or student teams and directed by faculty member. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 498. Comprehensive Examination Seminar

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours; outside study, nine hours. Seminar intended to begin process of developing independent proposal with related research and documentation that moves toward production of final document or book for each project. S/U grading.

  • 501. Cooperative Program

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: consent of UCLA graduate adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual Research and Study in Architecture and Urban Design

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 597. Preparation for Comprehensive Examination or Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 598. Preparation in Architecture/Urban Design for Master's Thesis

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research in Architecture

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to doctoral students. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.