• 1. Human Evolution

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 7.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Required as preparation for both bachelor's degrees. Evolutionary processes and evolutionary past of human species. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 2. Archaeology: Introduction

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 8.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; one field trip. Required as preparation for both bachelor's degrees. General survey of field and laboratory methods, theory, and major findings of anthropological archaeology, including case-study guest lectures presented by several campus archaeologists. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 3. Culture and Society

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 9.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; fieldwork. Required as preparation for both bachelor's degrees. Introduction to study of culture and society in comparative perspective. Examples from societies around world to illustrate basic principles of formation, structure, and distribution of human institutions. Of special concern is contribution and knowledge that cultural diversity makes toward understanding problems of modern world. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 4. Culture and Communication

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 33.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Required as preparation for both bachelor's degrees. Introduction to study of communication from anthropological perspective. Formal linguistic methods compared with ethnographically oriented methods focused on context-bound temporal unfolding of communicative activities. Topics include language in everyday life and ritual events, socialization, literacy, multilingualism, miscommunication, political discourse, and art-making as cultural activity. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • 100. History of Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 182.) Lecture, three hours. Brief survey of development of Western social science, particularly anthropology, from Greek and Roman thought to emergence of evolutionary theory and concept of culture in late 19th century. Root paradigm of Western social science and its influence on such notables as Durkheim, Freud, Hall, Lombroso, Marx, Piaget, Terman, and others. Consideration of how this influences ethnocentrism and Eurocentrism, sexism, racism, perception of deviance, and view of culture in general. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 110. Principles of Archaeology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 110P.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 2. Intended for students interested in conceptual structure of scientific archaeology. Archaeological method and theory with emphasis on what archaeologists do and how and why they do it. Consideration of field strategies, formation processes, chronological frameworks, and other crucial principles of archaeological analysis and interpretation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM110Q. Introduction to Archaeological Sciences

    Units: 4

    (Same as Ancient Near East CM169.) Lecture, three hours. Basic understanding of newly introduced methods and techniques throughout field of archaeology to implement them and to appreciate and evaluate results of their use by others who have embedded them in their scholarly publications or theoretical models. Systematic instruction in digital data management and mining, scientific analysis of materials (including geological and biochemical techniques), and visual presentation of data and research results (ranging from simple graphs to virtual reality). Concurrently scheduled with course CM210Q. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 111. Theory in Anthropological Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 2. Method and theory with emphasis on archaeology within context of anthropology. Themes include theoretical developments over last 50 years, structure of archaeological reasoning, and selective survey of work on problems of general anthropological interest. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 112P. Selected Topics in Historical Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Study of selected topics in historical archaeology. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 112Q. Archaeology of Chiefdoms

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 114L.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 2. Examination of chiefdom societies in anthropological record, with readings focused on theory and data from archaeological, historical, and ethnographic literature. Illustration of how people in ranked non-state societies created remarkably rich cultures over entire globe beginning several millennia ago in both Old World and Americas. P/NP or Letter grading.

  • 112R. Cities Past and Present

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 119P.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 2 or 3. Examination of ancient and modern cities to evaluate how urban form developed and continues to thrive as human social phenomenon. Contemporary observations compared with archaeological case studies, including South America, Asia, Africa, and ancient Near East. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 112S. Politics of Past

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 115Q.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 2. Examination of social and cultural context of modern archaeology. Topics include legal frameworks governing archaeological practice, relationships between archaeologists and descendant peoples, and role of archaeology in current politics. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 113P. Archaeology of North America

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Prehistory of North American Indians; evolution of Indian societies from earliest times to (and including) contemporary Indians; approaches and methods of American archaeology. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 113Q. California Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. From earliest Californians through 10,000 years of history, study of diversity in California's original peoples. Aspects of technology, ideology, ecology, and social/political organization. Historic impacts on California Indians by Euro-Americans. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 113R. Southwestern Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Examination of prehistory of American Southwest from 11,000 years ago to historic times. Emphasis on describing and explaining cultural variation and change, employing evolutionary perspective. Special attention to advent of farming and settled towns, large-scale interactive networks, abandonment of Four Corners area, and historic cultures. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 114P. Ancient Civilizations of Mesoamerica

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Archaeology of pre-Hispanic native cultures of Mesoamerica from late Pleistocene through Spanish conquest, with emphasis on formative sociopolitical developments, classic period civilizations, and Aztec society as revealed by archaeology and early Spanish writing. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 114Q. Ancient Civilizations of Andean South America

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 114R.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 2 or 3. Pre-Hispanic and Conquest period native cultures of Andean South America, as revealed by archaeology and early Spanish writing. Incas and their predecessors in Peru, with emphasis on sociopolitical systems, economic patterns, religion, and aesthetic and intellectual achievements. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M115. Archaeology of Egypt and Sudan

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M119E.) (Same as Ancient Near East M105.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Ancient Egypt is well known for iconic archaeological sites such as Giza Pyramids and Tomb of Tutankhamun. From these and thousands of less well-known sites, enormous variety of archaeological information can be gained. Through discussion of particular archaeological themes, regions, or sites, examination of methods of prehistoric and historic archaeology and how archaeological information contributes to understanding of social, political, and religious history. Background provided for development of group research projects--finding resources, data gathering, analysis, interpretation, presentation, and training on how to embark on research in this field. Computer laboratory component included in which student research is performed and presented in time map. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 116P. Archaeology of South Asia

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 116.) Lecture, three hours. Archaeology of Harappan, early historic, and medieval periods in Indian subcontinent. Investigation of large-scale social movements such as Buddhism, as well as consideration of how past is interpreted in present. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 116Q. Selected Topics in Archaeology of China

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 116N.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of current developments and key issues in archaeology of early Chinese civilizations. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or Letter grading.

  • M116R. Archaeological Landscapes of China

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 116S.) (Same as Chinese M183.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Declassified space images from Cold War era and open remote sensing data of 21st century provide new opportunities for studying landscape transformation in historical China. Combining lectures, library research, and hands-on analysis of archaeological sites on satellite images, investigation of changing historical and archaeological landscape in China during last 5,000 years. Social processes at various scales, from emergence of early cities to rise of metropolitan centers and formation of imperial landscapes. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 116S. Selected Topics in Archaeology of Southeast Asia

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Study of selected topics in archaeology and prehistory of Southeast Asia from Pleistocene to European colonization, including population movements, emergence of agriculture, and development of state level societies. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C117. Selected Laboratory Topics in Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Specialized analysis of particular classes of cultural remains. Topic may be one of following: zooarchaeology, paleoethnobotany, ceramics, lithic analysis, rock art. Laboratory experience with collections and data. May be repeated for credit with topic change. Concurrently scheduled with course CM217. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 117P. Selected Laboratory Topics in Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 8. How archaeological research is furthered by specialized analysis of particular classes of cultural remains. Topics may include animal bones, plants, ceramics, rock art. Hands-on experience working with collections and data. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 119. Selected Topics in Archaeology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 118.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Study of selected topics in archaeology. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120. Survey of Biological Anthropology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 1. Limited to juniors and seniors. In-depth survey of theory and research in biological anthropology, including evolutionary theory, genetics, primatology, human evolution, and human behavior. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124P. Human Behavioral Ecology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 124A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Recommended requisite: course 1 or Life Sciences 1 or 7B. Survey of research in human behavioral ecology. Review of natural and sexual selection, kin selection, and reciprocal altruism. Emphasis on current empirical studies of modern human behavior from evolutionary perspective, including social organization, sexual division of labor, parenting strategies, conflict, and cooperation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124Q. Evolutionary Psychology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 124B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Recommended requisite: course 1. Survey of research in evolutionary psychology. Review of relevant theory in evolution and genetics. Emphasis on empirical studies of modern human behavior from evolutionary perspective, including social behavior, decision making, language, culture, and child development. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124R. Evolution of Language

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: course 1 or 4 or Linguistics 1. Designed for juniors and seniors. How did human capacity for language evolve? Examination of origin of human language from biological, comparative, developmental, social and computational perspectives. Topics include evolutionary theory, linguistic structure, gesture and speech, animal communication, language learning, language disorders, and computational models of language emergence. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124S. Evolution of Human Sexual Behavior

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 124P.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 1. Examination of human sexual relations and social behavior from evolutionary perspective. Emphasis on theories and evidence for differences between men and women in their patterns of growth, maturation, fertility, mortality, parenting, and relations with members of opposite sex. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124T. Evolution of Personality

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 1 or Life Sciences 1 or 7B or Psychology 10. Evolutionary hypotheses for existence of stable differences among individuals in patterns of thought, emotion, and behavior. Descriptive accounts of personality structure (e.g. Big Five). Comparison of explanatory models including balancing selection, facultative calibration, and mutation-selection balance. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 126P. Paleopathology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 129Q.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Evidence of disease and trauma, as preserved in skeletal remains of ancient and modern human populations. Discussions of medical procedures (trepanation), health status, ethnic mutilation (cranial deformation, footbinding), cannibalism, and sacrifice and roles such activities have played in human societies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 126Q. Evolution of Genus Homo

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 121C.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 1. Origin and evolution of genus Homo, including archaic sapiens and Neanderthals. Morphology, ecology, and behavior of these groups. Course ends with appearance of modern humans. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 128P. Primate Behavior Nonhuman to Human

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 128A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Review of primate behavior as known from laboratory and field studies. Theoretical issues of animal behavior, with special reference to nonhuman primates. Discussion of human behavior as product of such evolutionary processes. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M128Q. Animal Communication

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M127.) (Same as Communication M127.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for Anthropology and Communication Studies majors. Evolution, functions, design, and diversity of animal communication systems such as bird song, dolphin calls, whale song, primate social signals, and human language. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M128R. Hormones and Behavior in Humans and Other Animals

    Units: 4

    (Same as Physiological Science M140 and Society and Genetics M140.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of hormones, and physiology and genetics involved in hormonal processes and function. Interactions among hormonal levels, environmental stimuli, and behavior. Sexual behavior, pregnancy, and lactation, parental behavior, development and emigration, stress, social behavior, dominance relationships, aggression, chemical communication, and reproductive suppression. Critique of primary literature on behavioral endocrinology about humans and other species. Consideration of spectrum of noninvasive to highly invasive endocrine sampling methods, and which types of questions can be answered in laboratory and field, as well as ethics of hormonal studies and their implications for humans and other animals. Letter grading.

  • M128S. Primate Genetics, Ecology, and Conservation

    Units: 4

    (Same as Society and Genetics M142.) Seminar, three hours. Focus on genetic research on wild primates at different geographic scales, using readings from primary literature on primate genetics, ecology, and behavior. Study of paternity and kinship, intrapopulational variation, population genetics, biogeography, systematics, phylogenetics/phylogenomics and comparative genomics. Utility and appropriateness of various markers considered for different research questions, e.g., mitochondrial DNA, microsatellites, nuclear genes, Y-chromosome, as well as GWAS and genomic/next generation sequencing platforms, and epigenetic markers. Discussion of methods in fieldwork and lab work, including sampling techniques, collection techniques, wet lab techniques, software analysis packages, and statistical analyses. Introductory-level understanding of genetics expected; study further illuminates areas in molecular biology relevant to case studies analyzed. Letter grading.

  • 129. Selected Topics in Biological Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 126.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Study of selected topics in biological anthropology. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 130. Study of Culture

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 3. Designed for juniors/seniors. 20th-century elaboration and development of concept of culture. Examination of five major paradigms: culture as human capacity, as patterns and products of behavior, as systems of meaning and cognition, as generative structure and semiotic system, as component in social action and reality construction. (Core course for cultural field.) P/NP or letter grading.

  • 131. Critical Social Theory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 181.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 3. Limited to juniors/seniors. In-depth introduction to work of classic social theorists, Karl Marx and Max Weber. Examination of their influence on anthropology. Exploration of recent attempts to synthesize both perspectives. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 133. Anthropology of Food

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 133F.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Production, consumption, and distribution of food, with particular emphasis on culture of food. Exploration of ecological history, class, poverty, hunger, ethnicity, nationalism, capitalism, gender, race, and sexuality. Food that shapes identities, desires, and needs in contemporary world. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C134. Mind, Medicine, and Culture

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Interdisciplinary discussion group hosting regular talks and discussions with scholars from UCLA and beyond. Group provides forum for exploring recent research and classical and contemporary theoretical perspectives that inform psychocultural studies and medical anthropology. Concurrently scheduled with course C234. P/NP grading.

  • 135. Visual Anthropology: Documentary Photography

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 133P.) Lecture, three hours. Photographs in anthropology serve many purposes: as primary data, illustrations of words in books, documentation for disappearing cultures, evidence of fieldwork, material objects for museum exhibitions, and even works of art. Topics include relationships between subject and treatment of image, between art photography and ethnographic documentation, role of museum photograph and caption, social practice of taking pictures, and case study on photographing Middle East and North Africa. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 136A. Introduction to Psychological Anthropology: Historical Development

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 135A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 3. Limited to juniors/seniors. Survey of field of psychological anthropology, with emphasis on early foundations and historical development of field. Topics include study of personality, pathology and deviance, altered states of consciousness, cognition, motivation, and emotion in different cultural settings. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 136B. Introduction to Psychological Anthropology: Current Topics and Research

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 135B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of field of psychological anthropology, with emphasis on current topics and research. Topics include study of personality, pathology and deviance, altered states of consciousness, cognition, motivation, and emotion in different cultural settings. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 137P. Anthropology of Deviance and Abnormality

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 135S.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 3. Relationship between culture and recognition of, responses toward, and forms of deviant and abnormal behavior. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 137Q. Psychoanalysis and Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 135T.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Exploration of mutual relations between anthropology and psychoanalysis, considering both theory and method. History of and current developments in psychoanalysis; anthropological critiques of psychoanalytic theory and method, toward cross-cultural psychoanalytic approach. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 138P. Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 139.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to skills and tools of data ascertainment through fieldwork in cultural anthropology. Emphasis on techniques, methods, and concepts of ethnographical research and how basic observational information is systematized for presentation, analysis, and cross-cultural comparison. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M138Q. Fieldwork in Asian American and Pacific Islander Communities

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M139P.) (Same as Asian American Studies M143A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to qualitative research methods and application of techniques in data collection, analysis, and reporting. Critical reflection of issues related to identity, migration, multiculturalism, tourism, and indigenous rights. Field excursions and guest lecturers from local community included. Given in Hawai'i. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 139. Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 137.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Study of selected topics in cultural anthropology. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 140. Study of Social Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 150.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 3. Introduction to more specialized social anthropology courses. Evaluation of variation in sociocultural systems, with special emphasis on forms of inequality. Basic frameworks of anthropological analysis; historical context and development of social anthropology discipline. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 142P. Anthropology of Religion

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 156.) Lecture, three hours. Survey of various methodologies in comparative study of religious ideologies and action systems, including understanding particular religions through descriptive and structural approaches, and identification of social and psychological factors that may account for variation in religious systems cross-culturally. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 142Q. Ethnic and Religious Minorities

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Analytical overview of ethnic and religious minorities in contemporary Middle East and North Africa structured around sociocultural experiences of ethnic and religious groups to understand their political and economic realities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 143. Economic Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 153P.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 3. Introduction to anthropological perspectives for interpretation of economic life and institutions. Economic facts to be placed in their larger social, political, and cultural contexts; examination of modes of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services in their relation to social networks, power structures, and institutions of family, kinship, and class. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M144P. Constructing Race

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M159P.) (Same as African American Studies M159P and Asian American Studies M169.) Lecture, three hours. Examination of race, socially constructed category, from anthropological perspective. Consideration of development of racial categories over time and in different regions, racial passing, multiracial identity in U.S., whiteness, race in popular culture, and race and identity. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M144Q. Afro-American Experience in U.S.

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M164.) (Same as African American Studies M164.) Lecture, three hours. Promotes understanding of contemporary sociocultural forms among Afro-Americans in U.S. by presenting comparative and diachronic perspective on Afro-American experience in New World. Emphasis on utilization of anthropological concepts and methods in understanding origins and maintenance of particular patterns of adaptation among black Americans. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 144R. Anthros and Indians: Racism, Colonialism, and Development of Anthropology in America

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 160A. Examination of long-standing contentious relationship between American Indians and discipline of anthropology and history of anthropological study of American Indians in United States. Consideration of way anthropology has contributed to repression and marginalization--even subjugation--of Indians in American society. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C144S. Repatriation of Native American Human Remains and Cultural Objects

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C169R.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Native Americans have recently been successful in obtaining passage of federal and state laws repatriating human remains and cultural objects to them. Examination of this phenomenon. Concurrently scheduled with course C244S. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C144S. Repatriation of Native American Human Remains and Cultural Objects (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C169R.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Native Americans have recently been successful in obtaining passage of federal and state laws repatriating human remains and cultural objects to them. Examination of this phenomenon. May be concurrently scheduled with course C244S. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M145P. Marriage, Family, and Kinship

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M151.) (Same as Gender Studies M154P.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 3. Examination of understandings of kinship in cross-cultural perspective and impact of kinship on interpersonal relationships, gender roles, and sociocultural systems. Readings from popular materials and formal ethnographic accounts. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M145Q. Selected Topics in Gender Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 154P.) (Same as Gender Studies M154Q.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: prior anthropology or gender studies courses. Designed for junior/senior social sciences majors. Comparative study of women's lives and gender systems and cultures from anthropological perspective. Critical review of relevant theoretical issues using ethnography, case study, and presentations. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M145R. Women and Social Movements

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M155Q.) (Same as Gender Studies M154R.) Lecture/discussion, three hours. Recommended preparation: prior gender studies or anthropology courses. Comparative studies of social movements (e.g., nationalist, socialist, liberal/reform), beginning with Russia and China and including Cuba, Algeria, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Nicaragua, and Iran. Analysis of women's participation in social transformations and centrality of gender interests. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 145S. Culture, Gender, Sexuality

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M134.) Lecture, three hours. Comparative analysis of role of environment, history, and culture in structuring of patterns of gender and sexuality. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M145T. Women's Voices: Their Critique of Anthropology of Japan

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M155.) (Same as Gender Studies M154T.) Lecture, three hours. Preparation: introductory sociocultural anthropology course. Anthropology of Japan has long viewed Japan as homogeneous whole. Restoration of diversity and contradiction in it by listening to voices of Japanese women in various historical contexts. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 146. Urban Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 167.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for junior/senior social sciences majors. Introduction to modern industrial cities and urban life. Examination of notion of urban space in context of social relations by drawing from historical and cross-cultural urban ethnographies. Urban space is created according to needs of capital and actions of urban subjects. Exploration of ways in which class, gender, race, and geography shape or contest perspectives and priorities on urban issues. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 147. Development Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 161.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 3. Designed for juniors/seniors. Comparative study of planned and unplanned development, in particular as it affects rural societies. Emphasis on impact of capital, technological change and gender differences, economic differentiation and class, urban/rural relations, and migration. Discussion of theoretical issues in light of case studies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M148. Past People and Their Lessons for Our Own Future

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered M158Q.) (Same as Geography M153 and Honors Collegium M152.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Examination of modern and past people that met varying fates, as background to examination of how other modern people are coping or failing to cope with similar issues. Letter grading.

  • 149. Selected Topics in Social Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 157.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Study of selected topics in social anthropology. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M150. Language in Culture

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered M140.) (Same as Linguistics M146.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; fieldwork, two hours. Requisite: course 4 or Linguistics 20. Study of language as aspect of culture; relation of habitual thought and behavior to language; and language and classification of experience. Holistic approach to study of language, with emphasis on relationship of linguistic anthropology to fields of biological, cultural, and social anthropology, as well as archaeology. (Core course for linguistics field.) P/NP or letter grading.

  • 151. Ethnography of Everyday Speech

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered 141.) Lecture, three hours; fieldwork. Requisite: course 4. Designed for juniors/seniors. Course has two interrelated objectives: (1) to introduce students to ethnography of communication--description and analysis of situated communicative behavior--and sociocultural knowledge that it reflects and (2) to train students to recognize, describe, and analyze relevant linguistic, proxemic, and kinesic aspects of face-to-face interaction. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 152P. Language Socialization

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 149E.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Exploration of process of socialization through language, and socialization to use language across lifespan, across communities of practice within single society, and across different ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Examination of ways in which verbal interaction between novices and experts is structured linguistically and culturally. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 152Q. Language and Social Organization through Life Cycle

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 149F.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 4. Examination of forms of participation and talk-in-interaction across various phases of life cycle from birth to old age, using videotaped interactions of naturally occurring activities. How language and interaction within specific contexts are used to constitute identity and how interaction order resulting from face-to-face interaction provides building blocks for larger formations that arise from such activities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 152R. Language, Culture, and Education

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 149D.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 4. Examination of various ways in which culture, and language in particular, influence not only educational processes and outcomes, but also very conceptions of what normal development processes and desirable educational outcomes are. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 153. Language and Identity

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 149A.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 4. Language as social phenomenon. Introduction to several angles from which language use can be critically examined as integral to interactions between individuals and between social groups. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 154P. Multilingualism: Communities and Histories in Contact

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 149C.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 4. Examination of communicative, political, and poetic aspects of use of two or more languages (multilingualism) by individuals and by groups. Broader themes in social theory, anthropological inquiry, sociolinguistics, and literary studies in lectures to contextualize class readings. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 154Q. Gender and Language in Society

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 149B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 4. Examination of role language plays in social construction of gender identities and ways in which gender impacts language use and ideologies. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 154SL. Gender and Language across Communities

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 149SL.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 4. Examination of how language practices contribute to expression of gendered identities in different social groups and situations. Completion of 20 hours of service learning in community service program coordinated through Center for Community Learning required. Active participation in organized service that is conducted in and meets needs of communities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C155. Native American Languages and Cultures

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C144.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 4 or American Indian Studies M10. Introduction and comparative analysis of sociocultural aspects of language use in Native North American Indian speech communities. Specific foci include both micro- and macro-sociolinguistic topics. Micro-sociolinguistic topics are comprised of such issues as multilingualism, cultural differences regarding appropriate communicative behavior and variation within speech communities (e.g., male and female speech, baby talk, ceremonial speech, etc.). Macro-sociolinguistic considerations include language contact and its relationship to language change and language in American Indian education. Concurrently scheduled with course C255. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M156. Language Endangerment and Linguistic Revitalization

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M162.) (Same as American Indian Studies M162.) Lecture, three hours; activity, one hour. Requisites: course 4, American Indian Studies M10. Examination of causes and consequences of current worldwide loss of linguistic diversity and revelation of kinds of efforts that members of threatened heritage language communities have produced in their attempt to revitalize these languages. Projected loss of as many as half of world's languages by end of 21st century can only be explained as outcome of such factors as nationalism, global economic forces, language ideological change, and language shift away from smaller indigenous and tribal languages. Since loss of such languages means both reduction of cultural as well as linguistic diversity, many affected communities have engaged in various language renewal practices. Examination of some diverse strategies that have been attempted, including immersion, language and culture classes, master-apprentice, interactive multimedia, mass media approaches, and language policy-reform approaches. Evaluation of effectiveness of these measures and of very imagery used to discuss language endangment. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M157W. Talk and Body

    Units: 5

    (Formerly numbered M148W.) (Same as Communication M123W.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Relationship between language and human body raises host of interesting topics. New approaches to phenomena such as embodiment become possible when body is analyzed, not as isolated entity, but as visible agent whose talk and action are lodged within both processes of human interaction and rich settings where people pursue courses of action that count in their lives. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

  • M158. Culture of Jazz Aesthetics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M142R.) (Same as Ethnomusicology M130.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 3 or 4 or Ethnomusicology 20A or 20B or 20C. Aesthetics of jazz from point of view of musicians who shaped jazz as art form in 20th century. Listening to and interacting with professional jazz musicians who answer questions and give musical demonstrations. Analytical resources and historical knowledge of musicians and ethnomusicologists combined with those interested in jazz as cultural tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 159. Selected Topics in Linguistic Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 147.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Study of selected topics in linguistic anthropology. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 160A. Native North Americans

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 172A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Consideration of diversity of Native American societies north of Mexico, including their origins, formation, and development. Particular attention to subsistence systems and their relationship to social institutions and cultural practices, especially religion. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 160B. Change and Continuity among Native North Americans

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 172B.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 160A. Consideration of tremendous change Native American societies and cultures have undergone since European contact. Emphasis on patterns of adaptation and continuity as Native Americans confronted colonization and its implications. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 161. Latin American Communities

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 173Q.) Lecture, three hours. Overview of social and cultural anthropology of small communities in Latin America. Similarities and contrasts in social organization and interpersonal relations described in context of economic, political, and cultural environments. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 162. Ethnography of South America

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 174P.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to ethnography of South American Indians, with special emphasis on Lowland South America. Survey of history and development of man and society in this world area and examination of exemplary cultures symptomatic of various levels of cultural achievement. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 163P. Ideology and Social Change in Contemporary China

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 175Q.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to sociocultural changes in China from 1949 to present. Topics include ideology and politics in everyday life, social stratification and mobility, cultural construction of socialist person, changes in courtship, marriage, and family, and political economy of reforms in post-Mao era. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 163P. Ideology and Social Change in Contemporary China (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 175Q.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Introduction to sociocultural changes in China from 1949 to present. Topics include ideology and politics in everyday life, social stratification and mobility, cultural construction of socialist person, changes in courtship, marriage, and family, and political economy of reforms in post-Mao era. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 163Q. Societies of Central Asia

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 175R.) Lecture, three hours. Overview of culture and society among diverse peoples of Inner Asia, including Mongolia, Tibet, and Soviet Central Asia. Topics include environment and economic adaptation, politics in traditional isolation and within framework of recent national integration, kinship, forms of marriage and status of women, religion and social order in Hindu/Buddhist culture contact zone, and current problems of modernization. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 163R. Japan

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 175S.) Lecture, three hours. Overview of contemporary Japanese society. General introduction, kinship, marriage and family life, social mobility and education, norms and values, religions, patterns of interpersonal relations, social deviance. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 166P. Sub-Saharan Africa

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 171.) Lecture, three hours. Issues of ecology and political economy; continuing impacts of colonialism, nationalism, and current challenges for development; changes in social relations. Examination of Africa's significance to development of anthropology. Cultural background for understanding events in contemporary Africa provided. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M166Q. Culture Area of Maghrib (North Africa)

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M171P.) (Same as Arabic M171 and History M108C.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to North Africa, especially Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya, also known as Maghrib or Tamazgha. Topics include changing notions of personal, tribal, ethnic, linguistic and religious identities; colonialism; gender and legal rights, changing representations of Islam, and religions in region's public spaces. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 167. Culture Area of Middle East

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 176.) Lecture, three hours. Study of Middle East has suggested many theories as to developmental history of humankind, evolution of human society, birth of monotheism, and origin of agriculture, trade, and cities. Presentation of anthropological material relevant to understanding Middle East as culture area, and Islam as basis of its shared tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 168P. Cultures of Pacific

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 177.) Lecture, three hours. Four major culture areas of Australia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and Micronesia. General geographical features, prehistory, and language distribution of whole region. Distinctive sociocultural features of each culture area presented in context of their adaptive significance. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M168Q. Ethnic Identity and Ethnic Relations in Hawai'i

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M177P.) (Same as Asian American Studies M143C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Continuing construction and expression of ethnic identity in various cultural forms and social contexts in Hawai'i. Overview of theoretical approaches to and basic concepts in study of ethnic identity and ethnic relations. Discussion of historical and contemporary aspects of ethnic identity and ethnic relations in Hawai'i. Given in Hawai'i. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 169. Selected Topics in Regional Cultures

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 179.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Study of selected topics in regional cultures. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 188SA. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to discuss selected USIE seminar topic, conduct preparatory research, and begin preparation of syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SB. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SA. Enforced corequisite: Honors Collegium 101E. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor to finalize course syllabus. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 188SC. Individual Studies for USIE Facilitators

    Units: 2

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Enforced requisite: course 188SB. Limited to junior/senior USIE facilitators. Individual study in regularly scheduled meetings with faculty mentor while facilitating USIE 88S course. Individual contract with faculty mentor required. May not be repeated. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 191. Variable Topics Research Seminars: Anthropology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Research seminar on selected topics in anthropology. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 191HA. Beginning Seminar

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to anthropology honors program students. Survey of major research strategies in anthropology to aid honors students in developing research proposals. Letter grading.

  • 191HB. Field Methods

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to anthropology honors program students. Survey of major field methods in anthropology to prepare students to conduct their own field research. Letter grading.

  • 191HC. Data Analysis

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to anthropology honors program students. Survey of major forms of data analysis in anthropology to aid honors students in analysis of their own research data. Letter grading.

  • 191HD. Writing for Anthropology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to anthropology honors program students. Teaching of writing skills, with focus on how to write honors theses. Letter grading.

  • 191HE. Writing for Publication and Conference Presentations

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to anthropology honors program students. Preparation of honors theses for publication and for conference presentations and posters. Letter grading.

  • 193. Journal Club Seminars: Anthropology

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Limited to undergraduate students. Discussion of current readings in discipline. May be linked with speaker series. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP grading.

  • 194. Research Group Seminars: Anthropology

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Limited to undergraduate students who are part of research group or internship. Discussion of research methods and current literature in discipline or of research of faculty members or students. May meet concurrently with graduate research seminar. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP grading.

  • 195CE. Community and Corporate Internships in Anthropology

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, to be arranged; fieldwork, eight to 10 hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship in corporate, governmental, or nonprofit setting coordinated through Center for Community Learning. Students complete weekly written assignments, attend biweekly meetings with graduate student coordinator, and write final research paper. Faculty sponsor and graduate student coordinator construct series of reading assignments that examine issues related to internship site. May be repeated for credit with consent of Center for Community Learning. No more than 4 units may be applied toward major; units applied must be taken for letter grade. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 197. Individual Studies in Anthropology

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned readings and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter (e.g., paper or other product) required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research in Anthropology

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 200. Conceptualizing Anthropological Research

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Introduction to process of conceptualizing research projects, including formulating and theorizing research questions and developing appropriate methodology to carry out research. Preparation of proposals and presentation to group for critique. S/U or letter grading.

  • M201A. Graduate Core Seminar: Archaeology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Archaeology M201A.) Seminar, three hours. Required of anthropology students in archaeology field. Seminar discussions based on carefully selected list of 25 major works related to development of archaeology in social sciences. Core seminars provide students with foundation in breadth of knowledge required of professional archaeologists. Archaeological historiography, survey of world archaeology, and archaeological techniques. Emphasis on appreciation of multidisciplinary background of modern archaeology and relevant interpretative strategies. May be repeated for credit with consent of adviser. S/U or letter grading.

  • M201B. Graduate Core Seminar: Archaeology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Archaeology M201B.) Seminar, three hours. Course M201A is required of anthropology students in archaeology field. Seminar discussions based on carefully selected list of 25 major works related to development of archaeology in humanities. Core seminars provide students with foundation in breadth of knowledge required of professional archaeologists. Archaeological historiography, survey of world archaeology, and archaeological techniques. Emphasis on appreciation of multidisciplinary background of modern archaeology and relevant interpretative strategies. May be repeated for credit with consent of adviser. S/U or letter grading.

  • 202. Biological Anthropology Colloquium

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Selected topics on status of current research in biological anthropology. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 203A. Core Seminar: Sociocultural Anthropology -- Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Anthropology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two courses from 130, 135A, 150. Examination of theoretical writings that shaped foundations of anthropology as scholarly discipline. Consideration of writings of Durkheim, Weber, Marx, and others. Letter grading.

  • 203B. Core Seminar: Sociocultural Anthropology -- Sociocultural Systems and Ethnography, Anthropology at Mid-Century

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 203A. Examination of development of major schools of sociocultural thought during middle decades of 20th century. Emphasis on formation of sociocultural theories, concepts, and methodologies found in contemporary anthropology. Letter grading.

  • 203C. Core Seminar: Sociocultural Anthropology -- Scientific and Interpretive Frameworks in Contemporary Anthropology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Recommended requisite: course 203B. Examination of selected contemporary works and issues in field of sociocultural anthropology. Letter grading.

  • 204. Core Seminar: Linguistic Anthropology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Theoretical and methodological foundations of study of language structure and language use from sociocultural perspective. Discussion of linguistic, philosophical, psychological, and anthropological contributions to understanding of verbal communication as social activity embedded in culture. S/U or letter grading.

  • 210. Analytical Methods in Archaeological Studies

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Preparation: one term of statistics. Data analysis procedures in archaeology. Emphasis on conceptual framework for analysis of archaeological data, beginning at level of attribute and ending at level of region. S/U or letter grading.

  • CM210Q. Introduction to Archaeological Sciences

    Units: 4

    (Same as Ancient Near East CM269.) Lecture, three hours. Basic understanding of newly introduced methods and techniques throughout field of archaeology to implement them and to appreciate and evaluate results of their use by others who have embedded them in their scholarly publications or theoretical models. Systematic instruction in digital data management and mining, scientific analysis of materials (including geological and biochemical techniques), and visual presentation of data and research results (ranging from simple graphs to virtual reality). Concurrently scheduled with course CM110Q. S/U or letter grading.

  • 211. Classification in Archaeology: Method and Theory

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate anthropology and archaeology students. Discussion of issues that have guided arguments about how archaeological classification of artifacts should be conducted, with focus on ceramic classification and discovery of cultural types. Methods for implementing discovery approach to classification illustrated with lithic and pottery examples. Review of relationship between classification, style, and function. S/U or letter grading.

  • 212P. Explanation of Societal Change

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 217.) Seminar, three hours. Examination of processes of societal evolution, emphasizing usefulness of variety of explanatory models from general systems theory, ecology, anthropology, and other sources. Specific research questions vary with each course offering. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 212Q. Archaeology of Urbanism

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 217A.) Seminar, three hours. Evaluation of cities as most complex form of human population center, using both archaeological and modern examples. Observations about material culture and space enable assessment of social dynamics as cities are constructed and lived in by variety of different ethnic, economic, ritual, and political groups. S/U or letter grading.

  • 214. Selected Topics in Prehistoric Civilizations of New World

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Mesoamerican and Andean civilizations normally constitute major focus of seminar. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • M216. Topics in Asian Archaeology

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art History M258B.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Topics may include identification of ethnic groups in archaeology, archaeology of religion, archaeological reflections of commerce and trade and their influence on social development, archaeology of language dispersal, cultural contact and nature of cultural influence. S/U or letter grading.

  • CM217. Selected Laboratory Topics in Archaeology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M212S.) (Same as Archaeology M205A.) Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours. Designed for graduate students in archaeology or in other departments. Specialized analysis of particular classes of cultural remains. Topic may be one of following: zooarchaeology, paleoethnobotany, ceramics, lithic analysis, rock art. Laboratory experience with collections and data. May be repeated for credit with topic change. Concurrently scheduled with course C117. S/U or letter grading.

  • 219. Selected Topics in Anthropological/Archaeological Theory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 285P.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Variable topics course on important theoretical subjects in anthropological archaeology. Topics include early village societies, specialization and cultural complexity, ethnography for archaeologists, power and hierarchy in intermediate societies, materialist/idealist debates, urbanism, and exchange systems. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 221. Behavior, Evolution, and Culture

    Units: 2

    Seminar, one and one half hours. Research seminar. Weekly speakers present recent findings and theories in behavior, evolution, and culture. Focus on biological approaches to human and non-human behavior, psychology, and culture. S/U grading.

  • 222. Graduate Core Seminar: Biological Anthropology in Review

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Graduate core course in biological anthropology. Topics include evolutionary theory, behavior of nonhuman primates, hominid evolutionary history, and contemporary human variation. Letter grading.

  • 223. Experimental Biological Anthropology

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Research seminar for graduate students conducting experimental research in biological anthropology to assist students in developing research ideas and methods and analyzing results. S/U grading.

  • 229. Current Problems in Biological Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 220.) Seminar, three hours. Detailed examination of current research in biological anthropology (specific topics to be announced). Emphasis on nature of hypotheses and their testing in ongoing student and faculty research. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 230. Practice Theory and Beyond

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 230P.) Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 203A, 203B, 203C. Background in classic social theory--Marx, Weber, Durkheim--assumed. Designed for graduate anthropology students. Basic texts in practice theory by Pierre Bourdieu and Anthony Giddents. Series of upgrades on basic practice theory framework, with greater attention to issues of power and need to historicize anthropological work, and new perspectives on concept of culture. S/U or letter grading.

  • 232P. Anthropology and Media Theory

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 233R.) Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Examination of theoretical assumptions and debates that animate visual anthropology very broadly defined, including issues of interpretation, production, and reception of visual media, which includes ethnographic, documentary, and feature films, as well as television programming. S/U or letter grading.

  • 232Q. Ethnographies of Information Technology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 233T.) Seminar, three hours. Emerging work on new information economy, with emphasis on ethnography. Reading of anthropological work and materials from range of disciplines, including sociology, geography, urban studies, and management studies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 233P. Advanced Seminar: Medical Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M263Q.) Seminar, three hours. Limited to 15 students. Examination of interrelationships between society, culture, ecology, health, and illness. Bases for written critical analysis and class discussion provided through key theoretical works. S/U or letter grading.

  • M233Q. Latin America: Traditional Medicine, Shamanism, and Folk Illness

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M264.) (Same as Community Health Sciences M264 and Latin American Studies M264.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: Community Health Sciences 132, bilingual English/Spanish skills. Examination of role of traditional medicine and shamanism in Latin America and exploration of how indigenous and mestizo groups diagnose and treat folk illness and Western-defined diseases with variety of health-seeking methods. Examination of art, music, and ritual and case examples of religion and healing practices via lecture, film, and audiotape. Letter grading.

  • M233R. Health and Culture in Americas

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M266.) (Same as Community Health Sciences M260 and Latin American Studies M260.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended requisite: Community Health Sciences 132. Health issues throughout Americas, especially indigenous/Mestizo Latin American populations. Holistic approach covering politics, economics, history, geography, human rights, maternal/child health, culture. Letter grading.

  • 233T. Narrative and Times of Trouble

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 266N.) Seminar, three hours. Recommended requisite: one course from 203A, 203B, 203C, 204, or 252A. Exploration of how linguistic and psychological/medical anthropology inform each other in relation to narrative and times of trouble. Topics include narrative sense-making in response to illness and misfortune; phenomenology of time; narrative, healing, and experience; remembering through narrative; narrative subjectivity; and narrative and selves in motion. S/U or letter grading.

  • C234. Mind, Medicine, and Culture

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Interdisciplinary discussion group hosting regular talks and discussions with scholars from UCLA and beyond. Group provides forum for exploring recent research and classical and contemporary theoretical perspectives that inform psychocultural studies and medical anthropology. Concurrently scheduled with course C134. S/U grading.

  • 235. Individual in Culture

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. S/U or letter grading.

  • 236. Seminar: Psychocultural Studies and Medical Anthropology

    Units: 4

  • M237. Psychological Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M234Q.) (Same as Psychiatry M272.) Seminar, three hours. Various psychological issues in anthropology, both theoretical and methodological. Areas of interest include such things as culture and theory, culture and personality, and culture psychiatry. Discussion of questions relating to symbolic and unconsciousness process as they relate to culture. Topics vary from term to term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • M238. Native American Revitalization Movements

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M260C.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of revitalization movements among native peoples of North America (north of Mexico). Specific revitalization includes Handsome Lake, 1870 and 1890 Ghost Dances, and Peyote Religion. Letter grading.

  • 239. Selected Topics in Field Ethnography

    Units: 4 to 8

    (Formerly numbered 239P.) Seminar, three hours. Discussion and practicum in various techniques for collecting and analyzing ethnographic field data. S/U or letter grading.

  • 241. Culture, Power, Social Change

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Cutting-edge research in sociocultural anthropology. Talks given by scholars from different universities around world and faculty and students from UCLA with discussion regularly attended by students and faculty from wide range of related departments in addition to anthropology. Additional discussions about recently published or unpublished manuscripts. Professionalization sessions for doctoral students. Topics of discussion vary from year to year. S/U grading.

  • 242. Urban Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 260.) Seminar, three hours. Intensive anthropological examination of urban setting as human environment. S/U or letter grading.

  • M243. Gender Systems

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M263P.) (Same as Gender Studies M263.) Seminar, three hours. Current theoretical developments in understanding gender systems cross-culturally, with emphasis on relationship between systems of gender, economy, ideational systems, and social inequality. Selection of ethnographic cases from recent literature. S/U or letter grading.

  • M244P. Contemporary Issues of American Indians

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M269.) (Same as American Indian Studies M200C and Sociology M275.) Seminar, three hours. Introduction to most important issues facing American Indians as individuals, communities, tribes, and organizations in contemporary world, building on historical background presented in American Indian Studies M200A and cultural and expressive experience of American Indians presented in American Indian Studies M200B. Letter grading.

  • C244S. Repatriation of Native American Human Remains and Cultural Objects

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C269R.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Native Americans have recently been successful in obtaining passage of federal and state laws repatriating human remains and cultural objects to them. Examination of this phenomenon. Concurrently scheduled with course C144S. S/U or letter grading.

  • C244S. Repatriation of Native American Human Remains and Cultural Objects (Effective Winter 2018 )

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C269R.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Native Americans have recently been successful in obtaining passage of federal and state laws repatriating human remains and cultural objects to them. Examination of this phenomenon. May be concurrently scheduled with course C144S. S/U or letter grading.

  • 246. Contemporary Problems in Africa

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 271.) Seminar, three hours. Problematic issues in Africa in light of classical anthropological literature and recent work by anthropologists and other fieldworkers in Africa, with cases from eastern and southern Africa. S/U or letter grading.

  • M247P. Japan in Age of Empire

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M276.) (Same as Asian M292 and History M286.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Since late 19th century, Japan expanded its empire into East and Southeast Asia. Coverage of that period and array of anthropological studies conducted in Japan's colonies and occupied areas in this hardly explored area of study of colonialism. S/U or letter grading.

  • M247Q. Central Asian Studies: Discipline, Methods, Debates

    Units: 2

    (Formerly numbered M287R.) (Same as History M287 and Near Eastern Languages M287.) Seminar, two hours. Introduction to study of central Asia as practiced in humanities and social sciences disciplines. S/U grading.

  • M248. Anthropology and History of Mediterranean

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M248 and Near Eastern Languages M248.) Seminar, three hours. Introduction to historical and anthropological writings about Mediterranean. Draws on variety of classic and contemporary theories, histories, and ethnographies about Mediterranean Sea. Topics include geographical and imaginary boundaries, Mediterranean honor/shame concepts, colonial and post-colonial Mediterranean, Levantinism, thalassology, Mediterraneanism, French Mediterraneans, Jewish Mediterranean, colonial and post-colonial sea and migrants and mobilities. Focus on critical history of anthropological study of Mediterranean and scholarly literature that emphasizes southern shores of Mediterranean. Letter grading.

  • 249. Selected Topics in Social Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 250.) Seminar, three hours. Intensive examination of current theoretical views and literature. S/U or letter grading.

  • 252A. Ethnography of Communication

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 242.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Seminar devoted to examining representative scholarship from fields of sociolinguistics and ethnography of communication. Particular attention to theoretical developments including relationship of ethnography of communication to such disciplines as anthropology, linguistics, and sociology. Topical foci include style and strategy, speech variation, varieties of noncasual speech genres, languages and ethnicity, and nonverbal communication behavior. S/U or letter grading.

  • 252B. Ethnographic Methods in Language, Interaction, and Culture

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 249A.) Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 252A or Sociology 244A. Ethnographic approaches to recording and analyzing communicative events and practices in their sociocultural context, involving student-initiated fieldwork in community setting. Emphasis on hands-on activities within theoretical frameworks that consider language as social and cultural practice. Devoted to skills related to collecting socially and culturally meaningful data. Letter grading.

  • 253. Language Ideologies: Political Economy of Language Beliefs and Practices

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 243A.) Lecture, three hours. Language ideological research problematizes fundamental assumptions about speakers' use of language and communicative practices: (1) speakers' awareness of these structures and processes and (2) relationship of this consciousness to speakers' political economic perspectives and to actual communicative conduct. S/U or letter grading.

  • 254. Discourse Laboratory

    Units: 2

    Seminar, two hours. Interdisciplinary discussion group around in-progress research projects, talks, published articles, and methodological and professional development in linguistic anthropology. S/U grading.

  • C255. Native American Languages and Cultures

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C243P.) Lecture, three hours. Preparation: prior coursework in either anthropology, linguistics, or American Indian studies. Introduction and comparative analysis of sociocultural aspects of language use in Native North American Indian speech communities. Specific foci include both micro- and macro-sociolinguistic topics. Micro-sociolinguistic topics are comprised of such issues as multilingualism, cultural differences regarding appropriate communicative behavior and variation within speech communities (e.g., male and female speech, baby talk, ceremonial speech, etc.). Macro-sociolinguistic considerations include language contact and its relationship to language change and language in American Indian education. Concurrently scheduled with course C155. S/U or letter grading.

  • 257. Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 247.) Seminar, four hours. Detailed examination of specialized topics in semantics and pragmatics. Topics vary from year to year and may include metaphor, theories of reference and denotation, honorific speech, evidentiality, reported speech, etc. May be repeated for credit with topic change.S/U or letter grading.

  • 258. Language Socialization

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 248.) Seminar, four hours. Exploration of process of socialization through language and socialization to use language across lifespan, across communities of practice within single society, and across different ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Ways in which verbal interaction between novices and experts is structured linguistically and culturally. S/U or letter grading.

  • 259. Selected Topics in Linguistic Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M241.) Seminar, three hours. Problems in relations of language, culture, and society. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 282. Research Design in Cultural Anthropology

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Primarily designed for graduate students preparing for fieldwork. Unique position of anthropology among sciences and resulting problems for scientific research design. Review of typical research problems and appropriate methods. Students prepare their own research designs and present them for class discussion. S/U or letter grading.

  • M284A. Qualitative Research Methodology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered M284.) (Same as Community Health Sciences M216.) Seminar, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Intensive seminar/field course in qualitative research methodology. Emphasis on using qualitative methods and techniques in research and evaluation related to healthcare. Letter grading.

  • 284B. Quantitative Research Methodology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 284P.) Seminar, three hours. Limited to graduate students. Recommended preparation: research design course. Hands-on approach to qualitative methods used in anthropological research and techniques for analysis of qualitative data. Particular methods depend on and are appropriate to research questions and designs students bring to class. S/U or letter grading.

  • 288. Relational Models Theory and Research Design

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Relational models theory (RMT) posits that people in all cultures use combinations of just four relational models (RMs) to organize most aspects of most social coordination: communal sharing, authority ranking, equality matching, and market pricing. Exploration of how people use these RMs to motivate, generate, constitute, coordinate, judge, and sanction social interaction. RMT aims to account for what is universal and what varies across cultures, positing necessity for cultural complements that specify how and with whom each relational model operates. Readings may include RMT research in social anthropology, archaeology, social theory, semiotics, linguistics, developmental, cognitive, social, political, moral, clinical, and cultural psychology, neuroscience, evolution, sociology, family studies, philosophy, management, marketing, and consumer psychology, economics, justice, public health, public policy, and international development. S/U or letter grading.

  • 294. Human Complex Systems Forum

    Units: 1

    Seminar, 90 minutes every other week. Interdisciplinary seminar series to provide students with exposure to current research in understanding nature of human societies from complexity and multiagent perspective. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 295. The Culture and Language of Intersubjectivity

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 203A, 203B, and 203C, or 204. Introduction to notion of intersubjectivity and its relevance for anthropological research. Exploration of problem of intersubjectivity in its existential, semiotic, and linguistic dimensions. Key topics include intentionality, consciousness, empathy, temporality, agency, experience, and embodiment. S/U or letter grading.

  • 299. Selected Topics in Anthropology

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered 297.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Study of selected topics of anthropological interest. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics and instructors. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 495. Teaching Anthropology

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar/workshop, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Required of all new teaching assistants. Workshop/seminar in teaching techniques, including evaluation of each student's own performance as teaching assistant. Four-day workshop precedes beginning of term, followed by 10-week seminar during term designed to deal with problems and techniques of teaching anthropology. Unit credit may be applied toward full-time equivalence but not toward nine-course requirement for M.A. S/U grading.

  • 501. Cooperative Program

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation: consent of UCLA adviser and graduate dean, and host campus instructor, department chair, and graduate dean. Used to record enrollment of UCLA students in courses taken under cooperative arrangements with USC. S/U grading.

  • 596. Individual Studies for Graduate Students

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Directed individual studies. S/U or letter grading.

  • 597. Preparation for Ph.D. Qualifying Examination

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. S/U grading.

  • 598. Research for and Preparation of M.A. Thesis

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation of research data and writing of M.A. thesis. S/U grading.

  • 599. Research for Ph.D. Dissertation

    Units: 2 to 12

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Ph.D. dissertation research or writing. Students must have completed qualifying examinations and ordinarily take no other coursework. S/U grading.