• 10W. Jerusalem: Holy City

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

  • 12W. Jerusalem: Holy City

    Units: 5

    Seminar, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 10W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

  • 14W. Medicine, Magic, and Science in Ancient Times

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: English Composition 3. Overview of history of medicine and sciences, focusing especially on Ancient Near East, China, and Meso-America. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

  • 15. Women and Power in Ancient World

    Units: 5

    Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of how feminine power confronts masculine dominance within complex social systems in ancient world. To gain political power, some female rulers used their sexuality to gain access to important men. Other women gained their position as regents and helpers of masculine kings who were too young to rule. Others denied their femininity in dress and manner, effectively androgynizing themselves or pretending to be men so that their femininity would not be obstacle to political rule. Many women only gained throne at end of dynasties after male line had run out entirely, or in midst of civil war when patrilineal successions were in disarray. Women were sometimes only effective leaders left in drawn-out battles against imperial aggression. No women were able to gain reigns of power through their bloodlines alone. Women's power was compromised from outset. Examination of root causes and results of this political inequality. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 20. Egyptian Hieroglyphs

    Units: 5

    Lecture, five hours. Basic introduction to language and hieroglyphic script of ancient Egypt. Devoted to learning principles of hieroglyphic writing and Egyptian grammar, deciphering standard inscriptions, and using hieroglyphic text editing software to type hieroglyphs on computer. Students acquire ability to recognize and translate hieroglyphic inscriptions on common museum objects. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M50A. First Civilizations

    Units: 5

    (Same as Middle Eastern Studies M50A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of great civilizations of ancient Near East -- Egypt, Israel, and Mesopotamia -- with attention to emergence of writing, monotheism, and urban societies. Letter grading.

  • M50B. Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

    Units: 5

    (Same as Middle Eastern Studies M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures -- Judaism, Christianity, and Islam -- historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 98T. Death, Afterlife, and Underworld in Cross-Cultural Perspectives

    Units: 5

    Seminar, three hours. Requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Freshmen/sophomores preferred. Analysis of how underworld is depicted in cultures throughout premodern world--from ancient Egypt to Judeo-Christian traditions--focusing on physical media, context of depictions, commissioning of depictions, and ownership of physical materiality. Letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • CM101A. Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, Predynastic Period to New Kingdom

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art History M110A.) Lecture, three hours. Study of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts during Predynastic period and Old Kingdom. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C267A. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM101B. Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, New Kingdom to Greco-Roman Period

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art History M110B.) Lecture, three hours. Study of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts from New Kingdom to Greco-Roman period. Concurrently scheduled with course C267B. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M101C. Ancient Egyptian Temple and City of Thebes

    Units: 4

    (Same as Art History M110C.) Lecture, four hours; fieldwork, one hour. Focus on ancient temples of city of Thebes (modern day Luxor). Theban temples are some of best-preserved cult buildings in all of Egypt, and their study illuminates traditions of artistic representation, architectural development, and social and political transformations echoed throughout all of ancient Egypt. Investigation of ritual linking of temples on Nile's eastern and western banks through festival processions, chronological changes in function and form of Theban temples through time, and statuary program of individual temples. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M103A. History of Ancient Egypt

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M103A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Course M103A is not requisite to M103B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Political and cultural institutions of ancient Egypt and ideas on which they were based. Chronological discussion of Prehistory, Old and Middle Kingdom. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M103B. History of Ancient Egypt

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M103B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Course M103A is not requisite to M103B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Political and cultural institutions of ancient Egypt and ideas on which they were based. New Kingdom and Late period until 332 B.C. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M104A. History of Ancient Mesopotamia and Syria

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M104A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political and cultural development of Fertile Crescent, including Palestine, from Late Uruk to neo-Babylonian period. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M104B. Sumerians

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M104B.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Overview of Sumer and related cultures of Greater Mesopotamia in 4th and 3rd millennia B.C.E., with focus on rich cultural history of region and integration of archaeological, art historical, and written records. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M104C. Babylonians

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M104C.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Overview of Babylonia and cultural history of region from late 3rd millennium B.C.E. to invasion of Cyrus in 539 B.C.E., with focus on history and archaeology of region, urban structure, literature, and legal practices. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M104D. Assyrians

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M104D.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Overview of Assyrian cultural history from its origins to end of Neo-Assyrian period (circa 612 B.C.E.), with focus on rise, mechanics, and decline of Neo-Assyrian Empire, which at its peak ruled ancient Near East from Zagros to Egypt. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M105. Archaeology of Egypt and Sudan

    Units: 4

    (Same as Anthropology M115.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours. Ancient Egypt is well known for iconic archaeological sites such as Giza Pyramids and Tomb of Tutankhamun. From these and thousands of less well-known sites, enormous variety of archaeological information can be gained. Through discussion of particular archaeological themes, regions, or sites, examination of methods of prehistoric and historic archaeology and how archaeological information contributes to understanding of social, political, and religious history. Background provided for development of group research projects--finding resources, data gathering, analysis, interpretation, presentation, and training on how to embark on research in this field. Computer laboratory component included in which student research is performed and presented in time map. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M110A. Iranian Civilization: History of Achaemenid Empire

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M110A and Iranian M110A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). From end of Elam and rise of Medes to Macedonian conquest of Achaemenid Persia. Emphasis on political history, state structure, empire's religions, and Greco-Persian interactions. Further accents on Cyrus' empire and Darius' world order, age of Persian Wars, Cyrus the Younger, Achaemenid Egypt, Alexander's conquest. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M110B. Iranian Civilization: History of Arsacid (Parthian) Empire

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M110B and Iranian M110B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). From Hellenistic rule in Persia to Sasanian conquest. Emphasis on political history, state structure, empire's religions, interactions with Hellenistic and Roman worlds. Further accent on Parthian conquest of Iran and Mesopotamia, Seleucid demise and Arsacid hegemony in East, Arsacid-Roman wars, rise of Sasanians. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M110C. Iranian Civilization: History of Early Sasanian Empire -- From Ardashir I to Rise of Peroz (circa 224-459 C.E.)

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M110C and Iranian M110C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). From fall of Arsacids to Muslim conquest of Iran. Emphasis on political and economic history, evolution of state structure, empire's religious landscape (Mazdism, Manicheism, Exilarchate, Church of Persia, Mazdakism), Persian and Roman/Byzantine interactions, Persia and East. Further accent on Persian-Roman conflicts and cooperation, Persia and Huns. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120A. Elementary Ancient Egyptian

    Units: 5

    Lecture, five hours. Course 120A is requisite to 120B, which is requisite to 120C. Introduction to hieroglyphic script and phonology and morphology of Middle Egyptian. Basic rules of Middle Egyptian syntax, with focus on nominal, adjectival, and adverbial sentences. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120B. Elementary Ancient Egyptian

    Units: 5

    Lecture, five hours. Requisite: course 120A. Verbal system and syntax of verbal sentences of Middle Egyptian. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 120C. Elementary Ancient Egyptian

    Units: 5

    Lecture, five hours. Requisite: course 120B. Reading of authentic Egyptian texts to deepen knowledge of Egyptian grammar and to acquire familiarity with aims and methods of philology, study of ancient texts. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 121A. Intermediate Ancient Egyptian Readings

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 120C. Course 121A is requisite to 121B, which is requisite to 121C. Thematic readings in ancient Egyptian historical, religious, and literary texts. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 121B. Intermediate Ancient Egyptian Readings

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 121A. Thematic readings in ancient Egyptian historical, religious, and literary texts. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 121C. Intermediate Ancient Egyptian Readings

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 121B. Thematic readings in ancient Egyptian historical, religious, and literary texts. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 122. Elementary Ancient Egyptian: Intensive

    Units: 12

    (Formerly numbered 8.) Lecture, 10 hours; discussion, 10 hours. Not open to students who have learned, from whatever source, enough Egyptian to qualify for more advanced courses. Intensive course equivalent to courses 120A, 120B, and 120C. Introduction to hieroglyphic script and phonology and morphology of Middle Egyptian, with emphasis on verbal systems, pronunciation, reading, and grammar. Offered in summer only. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C123A. Coptic

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to Coptic, final phase of Egyptian language, which is attested in writing from circa 300 to 1400 CE. Devoted to learning Coptic alphabet, grammar, and vocabulary (Sahidic dialect), with particular emphasis on historical linguistics. Concurrently scheduled with course C223A. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C123B. Coptic

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course C123A. Introduction to Coptic, final phase of Egyptian language, which is attested in writing from circa 300 to 1400 CE. Introduction to variety of Coptic textual genres, from hagiographies to homilies, magical spells, private letters, legal contracts, and Gnostic Gospels found in Nag Hammadi. Readings in texts in dialects other than Sahidic (Bohairic, Fayumic, Akhmimic). Concurrently scheduled with course C223B. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 124. Middle Egyptian Technical Literature

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 121C. Reading of Middle Egyptian technical literature in hieroglyphic transcription. Medical, veterinary, mathematical, and astronomical texts included. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 125A. Digital Cultural Mapping Core Course A: Place, Time, and Digital World

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to how emerging digital mapping technologies like geographic information systems (GIS), virtual globes, and three-dimensional modeling are being utilized as new means of inquiry in the humanities and social sciences. Provides students with critical apparatus needed to effectively, responsibly, and heuristically use technology in digital cultural mapping projects. Analysis of different forms of visual presentation, with focus on data representation through mapping, reasoning, and argumentation to learn to critically assess map-based presentations. Tracing of history of mapping and spatial representation of place to learn how mapping has always been connected with societal structures, politics, economics, and culture because maps do not merely represent reality, but also produce reality by structuring world and organizing knowledge about it. Part of Digital Cultural Mapping Project supported by W.M. Keck Foundation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M125B. Digital Cultural Mapping Core Course B: Google Earth, Geographic Information Systems, Hypercities, and Timelines

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design M125B.) Laboratory, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 125A. Hands-on laboratory-based investigation of emerging digital mapping technologies, including instruction in Web-based mapping applications, virtual globes, and geographic information systems (GIS). Critique and creation of maps of cultural phenomena, applying skills students learned in course 125A to real-world data sets in humanities and social sciences. By mastering emerging technologies in field of digital cultural mapping, students take part in evaluation and production of sophisticated visual representations of complex data, becoming active participants in development of this new field. How to use suite of GIS and neogeography tools. Fostering of creative approaches to and engagement with mapping technologies: What new questions can be asked and answered using these technologies? How does one reason, argue, and solve real-world problems through digital cultural mapping? Design, development, and implementation of student mapping-based research projects. Part of Digital Cultural Mapping Project supported by W.M. Keck Foundation. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M125C. Digital Cultural Mapping Core Course C: Summer Research

    Units: 4

    (Same as Architecture and Urban Design M125C.) Laboratory, three hours; fieldwork, one hour. Enforced requisite: course M125B or Architecture and Urban Design M125B. Participation in collaborative geographic information systems (GIS) research project in humanities or social sciences using skills learned in courses 125A and M125B. Gathering and input of datasets from real-world sources, creating visual representations of data through production of digital maps, and performing analysis of larger dataset to answer specific research questions. Final oral presentation required that details student work and provides critical analysis of source material and technological/methodological issues inherent to type of GIS used for investigation. Part of Digital Cultural Mapping Project supported by W.M. Keck Foundation. Offered in summer only. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M130. Ancient Egyptian Religion

    Units: 5

    (Same as Religion M132.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to religious beliefs, practices, and sentiments of ancient Egypt to study Egyptian religion as coherent system of thought and sphere of action that once served as meaningful and relevant framework for understanding physical reality and human life for inhabitants of Nile Valley. General principles as well as developments through time (circa 3000 B.C. to 300 C.E.). Topics include mythology, temple and cult, magic, and personal piety. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M135. Religion in Ancient Israel

    Units: 4

    (Same as Religion M135.) Lecture, three hours. Introductory survey of various ancient Israelite religious beliefs and practices, their origin, and development, with special attention to diversity of religious practice in ancient Israel and Canaan during 1st millennium B.C.E. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 140A. Elementary Sumerian

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: Semitics 140A, 140B. Elementary grammar and reading of royal inscriptions, letters, and administrative texts from Ur III period. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 140B. Elementary Sumerian

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: Semitics 140A, 140B. Elementary grammar and reading of royal inscriptions, letters, and administrative texts from Ur III period. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 140C. Elementary Sumerian

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: Semitics 140A, 140B. Elementary grammar and reading of royal inscriptions, letters, and administrative texts from Ur III period. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 150A. Survey of Ancient Near Eastern Literatures in English: Mesopotamia

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 150B. Survey of Ancient Near Eastern Literatures in English: Egypt

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Preparation: familiarity with Egyptian history. Enforced requisites: courses M103A, M103B. Survey of 3,000 years of ancient Egyptian literature. Reading of Egyptian texts in translation to study Egypt's intellectual history and trace transformations in its construction of cultural identity. Topics include invention of writing, autobiography, wisdom texts, narratives, royal inscriptions, and hymns. Discussion of text analysis such as narratology. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 160. Origins of Agriculture

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: Anthropology 8. Overview of prehistory of ancient Near East, with focus on human origins, origins of agriculture, and first cities. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 161. Archaeology of Prehistoric Mesopotamia

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Survey of prehistoric archaeological periods in Mesopotamia. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 162. Archaeology, Identity, and Bible

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Archaeological record of southern Levant (ancient Israel) from Bronze Age through Achaemenid Period (ca. 2500-332 B.C.). Development of ancient Israelite identities traced through combination of archaeological and textual sources. Cultural customs of ancient Israel and Judah, including social, religious, and political traditions, traced out of and compared with earlier Bronze Age traditions and Israel's Iron Age neighbors. Archaeological and textual data for identities, such as Amorites, Canaanites, Phoenicians, Egyptians, Assyrians, and Babylonians, form basis for evaluating construction and maintenance of Israelite and Judean identities. Introduction to theoretical and methodological issues involving historical archaeology of ancient Israel and Levant, and investigation of identity in archaeological record. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM163. Archaeology of Iran

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C163.) (Same as Iranian CM163.) Lecture, three hours. Designed to introduce students to Iranian archaeology from prehistoric through Achaemenid times. Concurrently scheduled with course CM259. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C165. Egyptian Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Opportunity to research aspects of topics in ancient Egyptian archaeology. Topics vary each year. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C266. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 166. Art and Death in Ancient Egypt

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Ways of death, burial, funerary ritual, and afterlife beliefs in ancient Egypt, as well as in ancient Near East and Nubia, with focus on ancient visual materials -- both objects and architecture -- from Predynastic to Roman periods. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M167. Magic in Ancient World

    Units: 4

    (Same as Classics M167.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: Classics 10 or 20. Exploration of art of influencing natural course of events by occult means as practiced in ancient world at large. Coverage of beliefs in supernatural forces, rites aimed at controlling these forces effectively, and character and social roles of ritual experts in various cultures of ancient world. Source material includes types of magical spells, literary texts about magic and magicians, and artifacts such as amulets and ritual implements. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M168. Introductory Hittite

    Units: 4

    (Same as Indo-European Studies M168.) Lecture, two hours; recitation, one hour. Recommended preparation: knowledge of language with case system. Introduction to Hittite grammar by series of graded lessons covering morphology and syntax, followed by readings of selected texts from variety of genres in transliteration. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM169. Introduction to Archaeological Sciences

    Units: 4

    (Same as Anthropology CM110Q.) Lecture, three hours. Basic understanding of newly introduced methods and techniques throughout field of archaeology to implement them and to appreciate and evaluate results of their use by others who have embedded them in their scholarly publications or theoretical models. Systematic instruction in digital data management and mining, scientific analysis of materials (including geological and biochemical techniques), and visual presentation of data and research results (ranging from simple graphs to virtual reality). Concurrently scheduled with course CM269. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M170. Introduction to Biblical Studies

    Units: 4

    (Same as Religion M172.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of original languages not required. Bible (Old and New Testaments) as book. Canon, text, and versions. Linguistic, literary, historical, and religious approaches to Bible study. Survey of history of interpretation from antiquity to present. P/NP or letter grading.

  • C177. Variable Topics in Ancient Near East

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Variable topics; consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. Concurrently scheduled with course C277. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M185D. Religions of Ancient Near East

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M185D and Religion M185D.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Main polytheistic systems of ancient Near East, with emphasis on Mesopotamia and Syria and with reference to religion of ancient Israel: varying concepts of divinity, hierarchies of gods, prayer and cult, magics, wisdom, and moral conduct. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 197. Individual Studies in Ancient Near East

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, one hour. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned reading and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research or Senior Project in Ancient Near East

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, one hour. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M201. Archaeological Research Design

    Units: 4

    (Same as Archaeology M201C.) Seminar, three hours. Requisites: Archaeology M201A, M201B. How to design archaeological projects in preparation for M.A. thesis or Ph.D. phase. Students do exploratory research to select subject, then write research design that could form basis for extensive paper, grant application, or oral examination. Students work closely with faculty members and report weekly on their progress. Preparation of at least two oral progress-report presentations, one on theoretical framework and one on practical aspects of project. Final written research design that incorporates theoretical and practical aspects of research and formulates bridging arguments required. S/U or letter grading.

  • M208. Topics in Ancient Iranian History

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M210 and Iranian M210.) Seminar, three hours. Varying topics on Elamite, Achaemenid, Arsacid, and Sasanian history. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 210. Late Egyptian

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 121A, 121B, 121C. Late Egyptian grammar and reading of both hieroglyphic and hieratic texts. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 211A. Egyptian Texts of Greco-Roman Period

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to grammar and orthography of hieroglyphic texts from Greco-Roman temples. Text readings and translation of various textual types. Letter grading.

  • 211B. Egyptian Texts of Greco-Roman Period

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to grammar and orthography of hieroglyphic texts from Greco-Roman temples. Text readings and translation of various textual types. Letter grading.

  • 215. Readings in Middle Kingdom Literature

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 120A, 120B, 120C. Survey of Middle Kingdom literature through close readings of texts in original language and evaluation of current scholarship on these texts. Students hone their knowledge of Middle Egyptian grammar and become familiar with philological methods in study of Egyptian literature. S/U or letter grading.

  • 220. Seminar: Ancient Egypt

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 221A. Demotic

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 121C. Course 221A is requisite to 221B. Introduction to Demotic grammar and orthography. Reading of texts from various genres. S/U or letter grading.

  • 221B. Demotic

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 221A. Introduction to Demotic grammar and orthography. Reading of texts from various genres. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.

  • C223A. Coptic

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to Coptic, final phase of Egyptian language, which is attested in writing from circa 300 to 1400 CE. Devoted to learning Coptic alphabet, grammar, and vocabulary (Sahidic dialect), with particular emphasis on historical linguistics. Concurrently scheduled with course C123A. S/U or letter grading.

  • C223B. Coptic

    Units: 5

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course C223A. Introduction to Coptic, final phase of Egyptian language, which is attested in writing from circa 300 to 1400 CE. Introduction to variety of Coptic textual genres, from hagiographies to homilies, magical spells, private letters, legal contracts, and Gnostic Gospels found in Nag Hammadi. Readings in texts in dialects other than Sahidic (Bohairic, Fayumic, Akhmimic). Concurrently scheduled with course C123B. S/U or letter grading.

  • 230. Seminar: Ancient Syria/Palestine

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Examination of selected topics on political, social, and intellectual history of ancient Israel. Exploration of how historical, social, and political contexts shaped and influenced interpretation and use of biblical texts. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240A. Seminar: Sumerian Language and Literature

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours. Readings of texts from various Sumerian periods and literary genres; selected problems in linguistic or stylistic analysis and literary history. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240B. Seminar: Sumerian Language and Literature

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours. Readings of texts from various Sumerian periods and literary genres; selected problems in linguistic or stylistic analysis and literary history. S/U or letter grading.

  • 240C. Seminar: Sumerian Language and Literature

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours. Readings of texts from various Sumerian periods and literary genres; selected problems in linguistic or stylistic analysis and literary history. S/U or letter grading.

  • CM259. Archaeology of Iran

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C259.) (Same as Iranian CM259.) Lecture, three hours. Designed to introduce students to Iranian archaeology from prehistoric through Achaemenid times. Concurrently scheduled with course CM163. S/U or letter grading.

  • 260. Seminar: Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology

    Units: 2 to 4

    Seminar, two hours. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 261. Practical Field Archaeology

    Units: 2 to 8

    Fieldwork, two hours. Participation in archaeological excavations or other archaeological research in Near East under staff supervision. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 262. Seminar: Object Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours; laboratory, one hour. Selected topics in analysis and interpretation of Near Eastern archaeological finds in museum collections. Students work with objects in Heeramanek Collection of Los Angeles County Museum of Art. S/U or letter grading.

  • 263. Seminar: Egyptian Monuments

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours. Selected monuments and sites in Egypt, including Delta, Nile Valley, desert sites, wadis, oases, and border regions. Architecture and decoration of temples and tombs, statuary and monuments, settlement and use history, text translation of appropriate documents, including stelae, monumental inscriptions, or pertinent socioeconomic texts. May be repeated. S/U or letter grading.

  • 264. Egyptian Museum Collections

    Units: 4

    Seminar, two hours; research group meeting, one hour. Ancient Egyptian museum collections around world, data sets, provenance and dating studies, collection history and agenda, museology, and exhibition history. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.

  • M265. Depositional History and Stratigraphic Analysis

    Units: 4

    (Same as Archaeology M265.) Lecture, two hours. Theoretical understanding of depositional processes ("laws") which lead to site formation and of stratigraphic procedures to be used in recovery of embedded cultural materials. Study of issues covered in literature, with specific test cases from actual excavations and site reports. Coverage of theoretical implications of such disciplines as surveying and pedology with help of specialists. S/U or letter grading.

  • C266. Egyptian Archaeology

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Opportunity to research aspects of topics in ancient Egyptian archaeology. Topics vary each year. May be repeated for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C165. S/U or letter grading.

  • C267A. Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, Predynastic Period to New Kingdom

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Study of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts during Predynastic period and Old Kingdom. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course CM101A. S/U or letter grading.

  • C267B. Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, New Kingdom to Greco-Roman Period

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Study of architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts from New Kingdom to Greco-Roman period. Concurrently scheduled with course CM101B. S/U or letter grading.

  • CM269. Introduction to Archaeological Sciences

    Units: 4

    (Same as Anthropology CM210Q.) Lecture, three hours. Basic understanding of newly introduced methods and techniques throughout field of archaeology to implement them and to appreciate and evaluate results of their use by others who have embedded them in their scholarly publications or theoretical models. Systematic instruction in digital data management and mining, scientific analysis of materials (including geological and biochemical techniques), and visual presentation of data and research results (ranging from simple graphs to virtual reality). Concurrently scheduled with course CM169. S/U or letter grading.

  • 270. Old Egyptian

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 120A, 120B, 120C, or one year of introductory Middle Egyptian. Advanced reading class in Old Egyptian, earliest of five Egyptian language phases, to prepare students for independent research on Egyptian texts dating to Old Kingdom (circa 2800 to 2100 B.C.E.). Through close reading of texts in original language and original format, students learn grammar, orthography, and phraseology of Old Kingdom texts as well as tools and methods of epigraphy. Focus on tomb biographies, royal edicts, and Pyramid Texts. Letter grading.

  • C277. Variable Topics in Ancient Near East

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Variable topics; consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics to be offered in specific term. Concurrently scheduled with course CM177. S/U or letter grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual Study

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

  • 597. Examination Preparation

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. S/U grading.

  • 599. Ph.D. Dissertation Research and Preparation

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. S/U grading.