• M10. Introduction to American Indian Studies

    Units: 5

    (Same as World Arts and Cultures M23.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; activity, one hour. Survey of selected Native North American cultures from pre-Western contact to contemporary period, with particular emphasis on early cultural diversity and diverse patterns of political, linguistic, social, legal, and cultural change in postcontact period. P/NP or letter grading.

  • M18. Leadership and Student-Initiated Retention

    Units: 2

    (Same as African American Studies M18, Asian American Studies M18, and Chicana and Chicano Studies M18.) Seminar, two hours. Limited to freshmen/sophomores/first-year transfer students. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M118. Exploration of issues in retention at UCLA through lens of student-initiated and student-run programs, efforts, activities, and services. Focus on populations with historically low graduation rates targeted by Campus Retention Committee. May not be applied toward departmental major or minor elective requirements. May be repeated once for credit. Letter grading.

  • 19. Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

  • 89. Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 89HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 99. Student Research Program

    Units: 1 to 2

    Tutorial (supervised research or other scholarly work), three hours per week per unit. Entry-level research for lower division students under guidance of faculty mentor. Students must be in good academic standing and enrolled in minimum of 12 units (excluding this course). Individual contract required; consult Undergraduate Research Center. May be repeated. P/NP grading.

  • M118. Student-Initiated Retention and Outreach Issues in Higher Education

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M118, Asian American Studies M168, and Chicana and Chicano Studies M118.) Lecture, four hours. Exploration of issues in outreach and retention of students in higher education, especially through student-initiated programs, efforts, activities, and services, with focus on UCLA as case. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grading.

  • C120. Working in Tribal Communities: Introduction

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers, students learn to participate within Native American communities engaged in political, social, and cultural processes of change and preservation. Development of proposal for Native nation-building project. Concurrently scheduled with course C220. Letter grading.

  • C121. Working in Tribal Communities: Preparing for Fieldwork

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Through readings, discussion, Native guest lecturers, and project participation, introduction to rules of conduct and skills necessary to successfully work or carry out community service projects for Native American communities and organizations. Concurrently scheduled with course C221. Letter grading.

  • C122SL. Working in Tribal Communities: Service Learning

    Units: 4

    Seminar, one hour; fieldwork, four hours. Enforced requisite: course C121. Recommended: course C120. Participation in community service learning project within Native American communities and organizations where students are mentored and supported by faculty members, other students, and project directors toward completing assigned service learning tasks and contributing to project activities. May be repeated with consent of instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C222SL. Letter grading.

  • C130. California Indian Strategies for Contemporary Challenges

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers, introduction to contemporary issues and processes of self-directed social change and political, cultural, legal, and economic processes of nation building in contemporary California Native communities. Concurrently scheduled with course C230. Letter grading.

  • 140. Federal Indian Law and Policy

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers, introduction to fundamental concepts and history of federal Indian law and policy. Investigation of contemporary policies and legal issues and exploration of Native responses to policy and law. Letter grading.

  • C145. Contemporary Indigenous Nations

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Introduction to topics on contemporary indigenous nations, including social movements, social and cultural change and continuity, nation building, law and justice relations, economic development, education and socialization, international relations, comparative policy, colonialism, migration, national and social identities, and other issues and social cultural processes, seen as distinct from ethnicity, race, class, and nation, with focus on indigenous communities that have maintained self-government, territory, and culture. Investigation and search for analytic and policy patterns that give greater understanding and knowledge about current conditions and social and cultural processes of indigenous nations. Concurrently scheduled with course C245. Letter grading.

  • 158. Nation Building

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; fieldwork/research, nine hours. Limited to junior/senior American Indian Studies majors. Examination of historical interplay of federal policies with tribal cultures that has shaped political development of American Indian tribal nations. Current developments within Indian nations, including restructuring government, developing economies, and asserting cultural sovereignty to be subject of research, study, and required community-based projects. Letter grading.

  • M161. Comparative American Indian Societies

    Units: 4

    (Same as Sociology M161.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course M10 or Sociology 1. Comparative and historical study of political, economic, and cultural change in indigenous North American societies. Several theories of social change, applied to selected case studies. Letter grading.

  • M162. Language Endangerment and Linguistic Revitalization

    Units: 4

    (Same as Anthropology M156.) Lecture, three hours; activity, one hour. Requisites: course M10, Anthropology 4. Examination of causes and consequences of current worldwide loss of linguistic diversity and revelation of kinds of efforts that members of threatened heritage language communities have produced in their attempt to revitalize these languages. Projected loss of as many as half of world's languages by end of 21st century can only be explained as outcome of such factors as nationalism, global economic forces, language ideological change, and language shift away from smaller indigenous and tribal languages. Since loss of such languages means both reduction of cultural as well as linguistic diversity, many affected communities have engaged in various language renewal practices. Examination of some diverse strategies that have been attempted, including immersion, language and culture classes, master-apprentice, interactive multimedia, mass media approaches, and language policy-reform approaches. Evaluation of effectiveness of these measures and of very imagery used to discuss language endangerment. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CM168. Healthcare for American Indians

    Units: 4

    (Formerly numbered C168.) (Same as Health Policy M168.) Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Identification of traditional health beliefs, health practices, and healthcare systems of American Indian tribes to understand role of U.S. government in healthcare services for Indian people. Description of health problems that have affected American Indian people and definition of contemporary health issues and measures taken to raise health status of American Indian people. Concurrently scheduled with course C268. Letter grading.

  • C170. California Indian History

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Introduction to overview of California Indian history, specific tribal community histories, and/or contemporary California Indian history through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers. May be repeated for credit with topic change and consent of interdepartmental chair. Concurrently scheduled with course C270. Letter grading.

  • C175. Cultures of Native Southern California

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to Southern California indigenous societies through readings, discussion, guest lecturers, and direct community participation. May be repeated for credit with topic and/or instructor change and consent of interdepartmental chair. Concurrently scheduled with course C275. Letter grading.

  • C178. California Experiences in Native Cultural Resource Management

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Exploration of creation and implementation of laws that affect cultural resource management in California, such as California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), AB 978 (California NAGPRA), American Indian Religious Freedom Act, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), from applied standpoint. To understand goals and challenges of these laws, examination of series of cases from California sites. Concurrently scheduled with course C278. Letter grading.

  • 180. Introduction to and Practicum in Native American Languages

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours; laboratory, one hour. Development of ability to converse, read, and write at elementary level in Native American languages. Introduction to both phonological and grammatical structures, vocabulary, and cultural patterns of using language as symbolic guide to culture. May be repeated with language change and approval of interdepartmental chair. Letter grading.

  • M186. Indigenous Film

    Units: 5

    (Same as World Arts and Cultures M187.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to study of indigenous filmic images and representations, with focus on selected ethnographic, documentary, animated, and feature films ranging from 1920 to present. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 187. Special Topics in American Indian Studies

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Variable topics selected from following: Myth and Folklore of Indian Societies; Contemporary American Indian Literature; Social Science Perspectives of American Indian Life; Law and American Indian; History of American Indians (cultural area); Dance and Music of American Indians (cultural area); American Indian Policy. Consult "Schedule of Classes" for topics and instructors. May be repeated twice for credit. Letter grading.

  • 189. Advanced Honors Seminars

    Units: 1

    Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to undergraduate lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 189HC. Honors Contracts

    Units: 1

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to upper division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • 195. Community Internships in American Indian Studies

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, two hours; fieldwork, eight hours. Requisite: course M10. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship in supervised setting in community agency. Students meet on regular basis with instructor and provide periodic reports on their experience. Designed to integrate theory and practice through experiential learning to gain firsthand knowledge of diversity, complexity, and variety of needs of American Indian communities. May be repeated for maximum of 8 units. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP grading.

  • M195CE. Comparative Approaches to Community and Corporate Internships

    Units: 4

    (Same as African American Studies M195CE, Asian American Studies M195CE, Chicana and Chicano Studies M195CE, and Gender Studies M195CE.) Tutorial, one hour; fieldwork, eight to 10 hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Internship in corporate, governmental, or nonprofit setting coordinated through Center for Community Learning. Comparative study of race, gender, and indigeneity in relation to contemporary workplace dynamics. Students complete weekly written assignments, attend biweekly meetings with graduate student coordinator, and write final research paper. Faculty sponsor and graduate student coordinator construct series of reading assignments that examine issues related to internship site. Individual contract with supervising faculty member required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 197. Individual Studies in American Indian Studies

    Units: 2 to 4

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to juniors/seniors. Individual intensive study, with scheduled meetings to be arranged between faculty member and student. Assigned readings and tangible evidence of mastery of subject matter required. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 198A. Honors Research in American Indian Studies

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, one hour; activity, three hours. Course 198A is enforced requisite to 198B, which is enforced requisite to 198C. Limited to senior honors program students. Development of honors thesis or comprehensive research project under direct supervision of faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 198B. Honors Research in American Indian Studies

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, one hour; activity, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 198A. Limited to senior honors program students. Continued development of honors thesis or comprehensive research project under direct supervision of faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 198C. Honors Research in American Indian Studies

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, one hour; activity, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 198B. Limited to senior honors program students. Completion of honors thesis or comprehensive research project under direct supervision of faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • 199. Directed Research or Senior Project in American Indian Studies

    Units: 2 to 8

    Tutorial, one hour. Limited to juniors/seniors. Supervised individual research or investigation under guidance of faculty mentor. Culminating paper or project required. May be repeated for credit. Individual contract required. P/NP or letter grading.

  • 199C. Individual Studies: Capstone Synthesis

    Units: 4

    Tutorial, three hours. Preparation: successful completion of eight upper division major courses. Limited to senior American Indian Studies majors. Faculty members help students relate their course-derived academic experience to their original research/service efforts involving Native American communities. Completion of research paper and presentation of student work at year-end Research Symposium required. Must be taken in conjunction with American Indian Studies C122SL or an alternative upper division course approved by program chair and academic coordinator. Individual contract required. Letter grading.

  • M200A. Advanced Historiography: American Indian Peoples

    Units: 4

    (Same as History M200W.) Lecture, 90 minutes; seminar, 90 minutes. Introduction to culture-histories of North American Indians and review of Indian concepts of history. Stereotypical approach to content and methodologies related to Indian past that is interdisciplinary and multicultural in its scope. Letter grading.

  • M200B. Cultural World Views of Native America

    Units: 4

    (Same as English M266.) Seminar, three hours. Exploration of written literary texts from oral cultures and other expressive cultural forms -- dance, art, song, religious and medicinal ritual -- in selected Native American societies, as these traditional and tribal contexts have been translated into contemporary literary texts (fiction, poetry, essay, and drama). Survey, from secondary sources, of interdisciplinary methodological approaches taken from literary analysis, structural anthropology, folklore, linguistics, and ethnomusicology. May be repeated for credit with instructor and/or topic change. Letter grading.

  • M200C. Contemporary Issues of American Indians

    Units: 4

    (Same as Anthropology M244P and Sociology M275.) Seminar, three hours. Introduction to most important issues facing American Indians as individuals, communities, tribes, and organizations in contemporary world, building on historical background presented in course M200A and cultural and expressive experience of American Indians presented in course M200B. Letter grading.

  • M200D. Economic Principles and Economic Development in Indigenous Communities

    Units: 4

    (Same as Public Policy M270.) Seminar, two hours; discussion, one hour. Limited to graduate students. Introduction to basic economic concepts and their application to issues of economic development in indigenous communities. Coverage of microeconomic and macroeconomic aspects of economic development using current and existing research. Letter grading.

  • 201. Topics in American Indian Studies

    Units: 4

    Discussion, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

  • M202. Qualitative Research Design and Methodology for Indigenous Communities

    Units: 5

    (Same as Health Policy M202 and Nursing M221.) Seminar, three hours. Introduction to some key theoretical themes in American Indian studies and exploration of methods that can be used to incorporate them in research on American Indian cultures, societies, languages, and other issues. Quantitative methods (design, appropriate use), with emphasis on qualitative research methods, ethics, and special considerations in conducting research in American Indian country. Design of research and exploration of feasibility of researching topics. Letter grading.

  • C220. Working in Tribal Communities: Introduction

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers, students learn to participate within Native American communities engaged in political, social, and cultural processes of change and preservation. Development of proposal for Native nation-building project. Concurrently scheduled with course C120. S/U or letter grading.

  • C221. Working in Tribal Communities: Preparing for Fieldwork

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Through readings, discussion, Native guest lecturers, and project participation, introduction to rules of conduct and skills necessary to successfully work or carry out community service projects for Native American communities and organizations. Concurrently scheduled with course C121. S/U or letter grading.

  • C222SL. Working in Tribal Communities: Service Learning

    Units: 4

    Seminar, one hour; fieldwork, four hours. Enforced requisite: course C221. Recommended: course C220. Participation in community service learning project within Native American communities and organizations where students are mentored and supported by faculty members, other students, and project directors toward completing assigned service learning tasks and contributing to project activities. May be repeated with consent of instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C122SL. S/U or letter grading.

  • 228A. Tribal Legal Systems

    Units: 3 or 4

    (Formerly numbered M228A.) Seminar, two hours. Course 228A is enforced requisite to 228B. Study of traditional and contemporary legal systems of Native American tribal nations. Detailed examination of several different tribal systems, including Navajo, Cherokee, Iroquois, and Hopi, with emphasis on diversity of tribal legal regimes, comparisons with Anglo-American legal system, changes in tribal systems during period of contact with non-Indians, and relationship between tribes' legal systems and other aspects of their cultures, such as religion and social structure. Independent research paper with focus on contemporary or historic topic required. Concurrently scheduled with Law 528. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 228B).

  • 228B. Tribal Legal Systems

    Units: 1 or 2

    Seminar, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 228A. Continuation of course 228A. Study of traditional and contemporary legal systems of Native American tribal nations. Detailed examination of several different tribal systems, including Navajo, Cherokee, Iroquois, and Hopi, with emphasis on diversity of tribal legal regimes, comparisons with Anglo-American legal system, changes in tribal systems during period of contact with non-Indians, and relationship between tribes' legal systems and other aspects of their cultures, such as religion and social structure. Independent research paper with focus on contemporary or historic topic required. Concurrently scheduled with Law 528. S/U or letter grading.

  • C230. California Indian Strategies for Contemporary Challenges

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers, introduction to contemporary issues and processes of self-directed social change and political, cultural, legal, and economic processes of nation building in contemporary California Native communities. Concurrently scheduled with course C130. S/U or letter grading.

  • 238A. Tribal Legal Development Clinic

    Units: 3 or 4

    (Formerly numbered M238A.) Lecture, three hours. Course 238A is enforced requisite to 238B. Students provide nonlitigation legal assistance to Indian nations. Projects include development and modification of tribal legal codes and constitutional provisions, creation of tribal dispute resolution processes, and drafting of intergovernmental agreements. Legislative drafting and cross-cultural representation skills emphasized. Faculty members meet with tribal leaders to inform them of availability of clinic services and determine whether clinic could assist them with their legal development needs. Once students are assigned to particular projects, they meet with relevant tribal officials and community groups with travel funds supplied. Students learn about tribal governments and legal systems, including federal constraints on activities of tribal legal institutions, and culture of tribe they are representing to be able to craft legislation and other documents that meet tribal intentions and needs. Concurrently scheduled with Law 728. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 238B).

  • 238B. Tribal Legal Development Clinic

    Units: 1 or 2

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 238A. Continuation of course 238A. Students provide nonlitigation legal assistance to Indian nations. Projects include development and modification of tribal legal codes and constitutional provisions, creation of tribal dispute resolution processes, and drafting of intergovernmental agreements. Legislative drafting and cross-cultural representation skills emphasized. Faculty members meet with tribal leaders to inform them of availability of clinic services and determine whether clinic could assist them with their legal development needs. Once students are assigned to particular projects, they meet with relevant tribal officials and community groups with travel funds supplied. Students learn about tribal governments and legal systems, including federal constraints on activities of tribal legal institutions, and culture of tribe they are representing to be able to craft legislation and other documents that meet tribal intentions and needs. Concurrently scheduled with Law 728. S/U or letter grading.

  • C245. Contemporary Indigenous Nations

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Introduction to topics on contemporary indigenous nations, including social movements, social and cultural change and continuity, nation building, law and justice relations, economic development, education and socialization, international relations, comparative policy, colonialism, migration, national and social identities, and other issues and social cultural processes, seen as distinct from ethnicity, race, class, and nation, with focus on indigenous communities that have maintained self-government, territory, and culture. Investigation and search for analytic and policy patterns that give greater understanding and knowledge about current conditions and social and cultural processes of indigenous nations. Concurrently scheduled with course C145. S/U or letter grading.

  • 261. Comparative Indigenous Societies

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Designed for graduate students. Investigation of detailed historical and contemporary ethnographic analyses of social change and cultural continuity within indigenous nations, primarily of U.S., but elsewhere also. Discussion of theories of change, comparative methodologies, and case materials. Letter grading.

  • 265. Federal Indian Law I

    Units: 4 or 6

    Lecture, three to four hours. Overview of federal Indian law, including nature and history of tribal federal legal and political relationship; basic legal definitions within federal Indian law (such as what is Indian country); equal protection issues posed by federal Indian legislation; canons of construction unique to Indian law; tribal sovereignty and its protection; basic questions of federal and state authority within Indian country; and tribal, federal, and state jurisdiction in Indian country according to default rules as well as special statutory regimes. May be concurrently scheduled with Law 267. S/U or letter grading.

  • M265A. Federal Indian Law I

    Units: 1 to 8

    (Formerly numbered M267.) (Same as Law M267.) Lecture, three hours. Course M265A is enforced requisite to 265B. Overview of federal Indian law through study of cases and historical and contemporary materials. Basic conflicts among sovereign governments that dominate this area of law, especially conflicts over criminal, civil adjudicative, and regulatory jurisdiction. Special attention to status and sovereign powers of Indian nations as recognized under U.S. law, federal trust responsibility, and equal protection issues posed by federal and state legislation singling out Indian nations and tribal members. Federal statutory regimes regulating tribal gaming and child welfare included. Students gain critical understanding of basic tenets of Indian law, bases of tribal sovereignty, structure of federal-tribal relationship and its history, and sense of future directions courts, tribes, and Congress may take in addressing current legal issues in Indian country. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 265B).

  • 265B. Federal Indian Law I

    Units: 1 to 8

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M265A. Continuation of course M265A. Overview of federal Indian law through study of cases and historical and contemporary materials. Basic conflicts among sovereign governments that dominate this area of law, especially conflicts over criminal, civil adjudicative, and regulatory jurisdiction. Special attention to status and sovereign powers of Indian nations as recognized under U.S. law, federal trust responsibility, and equal protection issues posed by federal and state legislation singling out Indian nations and tribal members. Federal statutory regimes regulating tribal gaming and child welfare included. Students gain critical understanding of basic tenets of Indian law, bases of tribal sovereignty, structure of federal-tribal relationship and its history, and sense of future directions courts, tribes, and Congress may take in addressing current legal issues in Indian country. S/U or letter grading.

  • M267. Federal Indian Law II

    Units: 1 to 8

    (Same as Law M382.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 238A and 238B, or M265A and 265B. Examination in-depth of principles and doctrines of federal Indian law as applied to property rights in land, cultural resources, hunting and fishing rights, water rights, and economic development. Special jurisdictional regimes established by federal statutes, such as Indian Child Welfare Act and Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, addressed. S/U or letter grading.

  • M267A. Federal Indian Law II

    Units: 1 to 8

    (Same as Law M382.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: courses 238A and 238B, or M265A and 265B. Course M267A is enforced requisite to 267B. Examination in-depth of principles and doctrines of federal Indian law as applied to property rights in land, cultural resources, hunting and fishing rights, water rights, and economic development. Special jurisdictional regimes established by federal statutes, such as Indian Child Welfare Act and Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, addressed. In Progress grading (credit to be given only on completion of course 267B).

  • 267B. Federal Indian Law II

    Units: 1 to 8

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course M267A. Continuation of course M267A. Examination in-depth of principles and doctrines of federal Indian law as applied to property rights in land, cultural resources, hunting and fishing rights, water rights, and economic development. Special jurisdictional regimes established by federal statutes, such as Indian Child Welfare Act and Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, addressed. S/U or letter grading.

  • C268. Healthcare for American Indians

    Units: 4

    Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Identification of traditional health beliefs, health practices, and healthcare systems of American Indian tribes to understand role of U.S. government in healthcare services for Indian people. Survey of Federal Indian Health programs and development of Indian Healthcare System and Tribal/Urban Indian Health programs to understand health problems that have affected American Indian people and definition of contemporary health issues and measures taken to raise health status of American Indian people. Concurrently scheduled with course CM168. Letter grading.

  • C270. California Indian History

    Units: 4

    Lecture, four hours. Introduction to overview of California Indian history, specific tribal community histories, and/or contemporary California Indian history through readings, discussion, and Native guest lecturers. May be repeated for credit with topic change and consent of interdepartmental chair. Concurrently scheduled with course C170. S/U or letter grading.

  • M272. Seminar: Cultural Property Law

    Units: 3 or 4

    (Same as Law M514.) Seminar, three hours. Exploration of identity, ownership, appropriation, and repatriation of both tangible and intangible cultural property -- those items that are of great significance to cultural heritage and cultural survival of people. Consideration of importance of preservation of cultural property as means of maintaining group identity, self-determination, and collective rights. Examination of both international and domestic law governing these issues, addressing such questions as How should cultural property be defined? Can cultural property by protected under existing intellectual property and cultural property regimes? How can we balance protection of cultural property against need or desire for its use in creative expression or scientific advancement? Examination of cultural property of groups in general, with emphasis on cultural property of indigenous peoples, including folklore, traditional knowledge, burial grounds, sacred sites, and ancient ceremonies and traditions. S/U or letter grading.

  • 274. Good Native Governance

    Units: 4 or 6

    Seminar, three hours. Examination of legal issues integral to governance that Native American nations face in 21st century, including those that impact and shape political sovereignty, economic development, constitutional reform, membership criteria, cultural property protection, sacred sites, religious freedom, and safety and criminal law enforcement, among others. Emphasis on breadth of issues that lawyers working with and for Native nations must confront. Integration and highlighting of legal issues unique to Native nations within California. Materials from traditional law review articles, books, and case studies derived from field research to engage students in multidimensional settings that confront Native societies. May be concurrently scheduled with Law 637. S/U or letter grading.

  • C275. Cultures of Native Southern California

    Units: 4

    Lecture, three hours. Introduction to Southern California indigenous societies through readings, discussion, guest lecturers, and direct community participation. May be repeated for credit with topic and/or instructor change and consent of interdepartmental chair. Concurrently scheduled with course C175. S/U or letter grading.

  • C278. California Experiences in Native Cultural Resource Management

    Units: 4

    Seminar, three hours. Exploration of creation and implementation of laws that affect cultural resource management in California, such as California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), AB 978 (California NAGPRA), American Indian Religious Freedom Act, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), from applied standpoint. To understand goals and challenges of these laws, examination of series of cases from California sites. Concurrently scheduled with course C178. S/U or letter grading.

  • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum

    Units: 1 to 4

    Seminar, to be arranged. Preparation: apprentice personnel employment as teaching assistant, associate, or fellow. Teaching apprenticeship under active guidance and supervision of regular faculty member responsible for curriculum and instruction at UCLA. May be repeated for credit. S/U grading.

  • 596. Directed Individual Studies

    Units: 4 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. S/U or letter grading.

  • 598. Research for and Preparation of M.A. Thesis

    Units: 4 to 8

    Tutorial, to be arranged. Preparation of research data and writing of M.A. thesis. S/U grading.